Yukon Charlie Wolf Pack Killed

iofthetaiga

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11 wolves is a drop in the bucket. More wolves will fill in where these were taken before you guys get done talking about it. The wolf shooting is to give people more opportunities to see, photograph and harvest more of the other species (caribou for one).
OK, so this pack was exterminated 9 years ago. What has happened with the wolf and caribou numbers in that area since then?

Please don't worry about them, no one wants to eliminate them all.
Lots of people driving around with bumper stickers advocating exactly that.
 

mark knapp

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OK, so this pack was exterminated 9 years ago. What has happened with the wolf and caribou numbers in that area since then?

Lots of people driving around with bumper stickers advocating exactly that.

You say they were exterminated yet, they were there again, you can't exterminate a pack as long as Alaska has so many wolves. Every year there is a redistribution of animals. That area was not devoid of wolves for nine years. There have always been wolves there and there will always be wolves there. That area has not been left alone by wolves or humans for nine years.

"What happened in those years?" The wolf population was kept just a little bit at bay and the ungulate population did better.

"Bumper stickers" You can always site a few idiots. I can also show you bumper stickers where idiots want to save all the wolves. Neither is possible for a healthy environment. I meant the middle 80% of people and the managers, the people in charge. Not the people on the fringes.

Wolves have legs, there is no such thing as a "Yukon Charlie pack" many times they are the same wolves and lot of the time there is dispersal where offspring of one group split off and join another group or join with those that split off a different group and find a new area to forge out a living. It's like watching a bear become a grizzly and back into a brown bear the same day or a caribou becoming a reindeer and then a caribou again later in the year.

Wolves reproduce at such an alarming rate that there virtually isn't an area in the state that can support wolves yet doesn't have them. As a matter of fact, we see them in marginal areas eating dogs off of chains in dog yards.

I know trappers that have caught every wolf in a pack one year and guess what? They had wolves to trap the next year. A friend caught all twelves wolves in a pack in Minto flats one year, and still caught more wolves the next year. One friend caught 75 wolves in one year on the Taylor Highway and continued to catch lots of wolves for years after that. When a guy like that retires or dies there is a real spurt in the wolf population.

How do I know these things? I have been here for 38 years, I trapped remotely for most of my adult life. We have trapped, hunted and controlled predators that whole time and we still have a whole lot of wolves and a whole lot of bears. This is nothing new, it's a continuation.

I have been on float trips, and with very few exceptions, I've always seen wolves. I was hunting caribou for 10 days one time and on that river, at that time, the wolves out numbered the caribou by 25 to 3.

It's like in the garden, you have to do some weeding if you want to eat some vegetables. You never wipe out all the weeds, (if you don't use poison) the weeds will be there again next year and you will have to weed again.

I love wolves, and I love bears but to keep them in abundance we have to kill some so they don't overtake the prey species. If they do that, we won't have anything.
 
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iofthetaiga

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Neither is possible for a healthy environment.
Reminds me of the day I sat on a highline landing with a logger while we both ate our lunches. He remarked that "trees is like corn; ya gots to manage it or it won't grow right." Such is utter nonsense....but some folks truly believe nature isn't capable of taking care of itself without our meddling.
 

mark knapp

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Reminds me of the day I sat on a highline landing with a logger while we both ate our lunches. He remarked that "trees is like corn; ya gots to manage it or it won't grow right." Such is utter nonsense....but some folks truly believe nature isn't capable of taking care of itself without our meddling.

I understand, you don't understand. For some, it takes four years of college and a degree to understand that there is really no balance of nature without man. It's a "boom and bust" situation without management. Civilized man has long since decided that we could do better for our wild game.

Wild trees are not really like wild animals, we are mandated by the constitution to manage our wild game for optimum yield. If we were farming trees for maximum yield, forest management would be different.

Don't take my word for it, look up "Modern Wildlife Management". It's a whole thing.
 
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