Tried and true game cart or sled???

Hatfield

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Anyone have or use a game cart or sled that actually worked out in the tundra hauling out moose or caribou ?
 

hoose35

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I havent been moose hunting in any places where I thought a cart or sled would work very good. Jet sled might work ok in some places with light loads, but haven't had too many light loads while packing out a moose.
 

kodiakrain

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This worked good for muskeg flats....

This worked good for muskeg flats....

This is a Walmart special, tho heavily made and proven hauling heavy loads of firewood out of the thick down to my truck. Something like $40 and I've had it working for years.

I used it to haul some pretty heavy loads of Elk on Raspberry island this year with good success. The tendency was to overload it tho as it has high sides. If too heavy, it got real tough on the uphills,
As for the downhills, "Amazing," it was, to watch all that weight just riding ahead of you with no effort.

IMG_6527.jpg


On the flat, or gently rolling tundra, similar to what you are asking, it worked Really Well,
across a boggy, muskeggy valley floor, it almost floated across that stuff, dry, no snow.

If it was over loaded, the uphills killed ya. Tho, If you just kept it at 100lbs or so in there it would be not bad even uphill.

Nice to not sweat so much from the pack frame method.
 

Jerod

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I've used the Caldwell Dead Sled on a couple different trips over the tundra and it works pretty well. They pack up small and you can easily toss them in a pack or tie them onto the outside. Nice and lightweight too. I have a tear in mine from pulling it over some stumps, but it still works fine. They will be more prone to getting torn up than a heavier duty sled, but you'll have to yank on it pretty good over a sharp stick to get it to penetrate... trust me. :D
 
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The absolute "best" sled out on the Tundra for dragging meat is a thick plastic tarp, and a bit of rope.
I have drug hundreds of whole Caribou carcass's with Tarp/Rope, alone, and even better as a team, skidding to where ever were (or I) are loading up, usually a boat. Plastic tarps are light and easy to fold and tie up and extremely light to carry and multi use anyway.

Cheap too.
 

sayak

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I've used the Caldwell Dead Sled on a couple different trips over the tundra and it works pretty well. They pack up small and you can easily toss them in a pack or tie them onto the outside. Nice and lightweight too. I have a tear in mine from pulling it over some stumps, but it still works fine. They will be more prone to getting torn up than a heavier duty sled, but you'll have to yank on it pretty good over a sharp stick to get it to penetrate... trust me. :D

I agree these type of sleds work great for pulling caribou, especially if there is even a little crust of snow, but even over bare tundra or grass they work great. The type I used out near Illiamna could roll up so you could take them in a plane w/o occupying much space.
 

Jerod

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Skrat, they come with three smaller straps for sinching the load. They work well for tying the sled onto the pack as well (it rolls up). It also comes with a long orange strap for pulling. It has hoops on both ends, and the sled has 8 notches in it, 6 on the sides for the sinch straps and 2 on the front for the tow rope. Here's one of my favorite hunting pictures.

l_c30a0fce3f83412491ae5070090046fe.jpg
 

Skrat

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Skrat, they come with three smaller straps for sinching the load. They work well for tying the sled onto the pack as well (it rolls up). It also comes with a long orange strap for pulling. It has hoops on both ends, and the sled has 8 notches in it, 6 on the sides for the sinch straps and 2 on the front for the tow rope. Here's one of my favorite hunting pictures.

l_c30a0fce3f83412491ae5070090046fe.jpg

Thanks, Jerod! That is an awesome photo. I appreciate the info and the awesome supporting photo!
I have used tarps in the past, over snow. I would be hesitant to use tarps, I guess, maybe, lol, over bare tundra, etc., thinking the hard plastic sled would offer more protection from bruising the meat?
 

Jerod

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Cabela's. I got it several years before, but never used it. I always had it rolled up and walked by it for 3+ years before finally trying it out. I went on a winter hunt and after a fresh ~2' snowfall, I shot a bull at the base of slope mountain. The sled worked pretty well in the fresh powder, but it was a chore since the sled would tilt sideways due to my narrow tracks cutting the path.

l_2dcb7e9b5e9d4c38a33ce89b89bc5f79.jpg
 

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