Tides and dipnetting

Chez

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I was talking to someone and they mentioned the best time to dip net for reds is around the high tides, is there any truth to that or what? If anything I would think the fish are more likely to come in on the incoming tide since it will require less effort on their part

Flossing is done successfully 24/7 regardless of the tides, wouldn't the same hold true for dipping?
 

kwackkillncrew

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I think the out going tide is better because the fish feel the pull of the current and makes them push harder. That being said every tide is different. Incoming tide is eaiser to dip off the shore because you can just stand there and not have to do the conga line goat rodeo

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Gr is for Greg

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Netted the mouth of the Kenai this weekend, and the outgoing tides seemed to be the most productive. I agree, it's counter-intuitive, but keep in mind that the entirety of Cook Inlet is tidal, so it's hard to say what stretch of that journey is influenced most by the tides. I doubt the fish enter Cook Inlet and begin moving only with the high tides. Or perhaps they intuitively know to enter the mouth of the river on the outgoing tide so that they are in a good position to ride the incoming tide up into the river as far as possible, getting the most bang for their buck, so to speak.
 

Bushwhack Jack

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I've heard two main competing theories on the subject. And I think both make sense and have their merits. One suggests that the outgoing tide is better because the smell of the river is more intense with the outgoing tide and so the salmon make a mad dash upriver with the outgoing tide. The other theory I've heard is the incoming tide is better because it's easier for the fish to fight the current of the river with the incoming tide. In hindsight, I've caught fish at high tide, low tide, on the incoming, on the outgoing and every time in between. I can't definitively say which is better but I know I prefer the high tide over the low tide because the low tide you are restricted to where you can go and it seems like I probably catch 3 flounder for every 1 salmon when fishing during the low tide. I also hate fighting the strong current on the outgoing tide, it can be quite brutal and makes it challenging for the people dipnetting to hold the handle, but I'm usually driving the boat anyhow.
 

AKBC

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The tide you don’t have to work is the best. Just go fishing and see what you can catch; don’t overthink the tides or commercial fishing openers.
 

boneguy

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It is a tide thing, but dip both sides. Start before the high tide and stay until you stop getting fish on the back side. Flossing on a low tide is only good if you are in a hole of fish waiting for the tide to come in to move or at a point in a stream that is not affected by tide.
DENNY
 

snow chicken

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Two hours after high tide is the magic hour for dipnetting. I rolled my eyes when I first heard this, but in six years of dipping, it has proved true. More generally, the first half of the outgoing tide is definitely the best, followed by the last half of the incoming tide. I limit every year with the net on the Kenai, but am terrible with a rod, so I don't know how this would apply to sportfishing.
 

snow chicken

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Anyone know how to move this thread over to the dip netting forum? It would fit in better and be more useful over there.
 

Chez

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Anyone know how to move this thread over to the dip netting forum? It would fit in better and be more useful over there.

I didnt see a dipnetting forumor I woud have started it there, sorry about that

Thanks for all the great info. I get 8 so far from the north beach. As much as I hate to admit it, size does matter and from everything I've seen the longer poles are puilling in more fish
 

Furudak

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I didnt see a dipnetting forumor I woud have started it there, sorry about that

Thanks for all the great info. I get 8 so far from the north beach. As much as I hate to admit it, size does matter and from everything I've seen the longer poles are puilling in more fish

The fish must be talking!!!!

Edit: Further out is generally good, but location can be an important factor.
 
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kwackkillncrew

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Te only reason that is a thing is because people stand that far out. Those fish cruise shallow. People push them deeper because they are jockying for the best dipping line. I have put my net on people heels before and caught fish.

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lrhowl11

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Just went dipnetting and it seemed the high tide was better but the worst was in between tides. So high is best then low tide, in my opinion.
 

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