Pavement Based Big Tires?

stillapa12drvr

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Looking to get insight from anyone that flies a Cub, -12, or similar from the pavement (i.e. Merrill) and back with big tires: Time has come to replace my 29" Airstreaks. The crowd at the dedicated -18 forum pushes bushwheels pretty hard...but I just can't quite get comfortable with the choice of either landing on asphalt / short asphalt taxi or landing on gravel / long asphalt taxi and Bushwheels. Any thoughts from the recreational pilots on here? Choice is probably 29" Bushwheels or Air Hawks.
 

Putzpilot

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Can’t say anything in regards a -12 but I’ve got the BW 29’s on my skywagon. I land on gravel at international and elect the straightest taxi route possible to park. They seem to be holding up good. I believe the landing on pavement is what eats them up. Really like the way they absorb shock and soften the stress on the gear. Huge difference compared to 8:50’s
i also do not notice any sidewall mush. Possibly on a crossslope, ie beach landing, but if needed one could up the tire pressure. For typical flights I round 12-13 psi. And sometimes carry some pretty heavy loads. 3350#.
 

stillapa12drvr

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Can’t say anything in regards a -12 but I’ve got the BW 29’s on my skywagon. I land on gravel at international and elect the straightest taxi route possible to park. They seem to be holding up good. I believe the landing on pavement is what eats them up. Really like the way they absorb shock and soften the stress on the gear. Huge difference compared to 8:50’s
i also do not notice any sidewall mush. Possibly on a crossslope, ie beach landing, but if needed one could up the tire pressure. For typical flights I round 12-13 psi. And sometimes carry some pretty heavy loads. 3350#.

Thank you sir. Appreciate the real world feedback. Even though I operate at gross most of the time, sounds like the 29's won't be stressed on the -12. Thanks for the input.
 

boneguy

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If you do get bushwheels get the extra rubber added!! 1/3 thicker rubber on the contact surface for 200 dollars per tire. last time I checked. Adds about 5 lbs per tire, well worth it. Tire choice depends on mission. DENNY
 

pipercub

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Well as far as saving money on tires that run on pavement, it is hard to beat the shaved 4ply 29” air hawks. Last pair I bought was quite a few years back @ $400 a tire. You of course need 10”wheels with those.
 

Putzpilot

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Well as far as saving money on tires that run on pavement, it is hard to beat the shaved 4ply 29” air hawks. Last pair I bought was quite a few years back @ $400 a tire. You of course need 10”wheels with those.

That sounds very reasonable compare to ABW 29,s. How are they for absorbing rough terrain? Can’t say enough for the ABW in that sense. Love how they handle rocky and bumpy terrain.
 

pipercub

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The bushwheels are obviously softer and can be run at a lower pressure with no tube. They also cost 3-4X as much... the shaved 4ply is relatively soft and handles off airport just fine. If you are operating somewhere that is tearing up tires, they make more sense...Save the bushwheels for hunting.
 

Float Pilot

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The old tried and true Goodyear 26 inch tires will last years and years on pavement and gravel. They cost a LOT less than bushwheels.
 

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