Older Tundra's

12bhntn

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
46
Reaction score
0
I have no snow machine experience but I have a chance to buy package deal of 2 late 90's Tundras with a 2 place trailer. One has just been overhauled and is in new condition and the other is his wifes machine and has 300 and some miles on it (basically new). Both are one owners and look excellent. I have no idea what these go for but the owners are our neighbors and take very good care of everything. They are asking 4000 - 4200 for everything I believe. If anyone has a good idea of what these sell for please let me know and also if I can get an idea of how hard it would be to sell one or both if I decide they are not what we need. Thanks for the help....
 

Dirtofak

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
2,267
Reaction score
165
Location
Beaver Creek
What do you intend to do with your machines? The Tundras are great if you use them for what they are made for. If you like long trips on fairly level ground, trapping, hauling freight, ice fishing or some basic light duty riding they are great. The older ones seem heavy to me. If they have reverse and are long track they should go for $1500-2500 each in 90% condition. Short tracks go for a lot less.

I have seen 300 Tundras pull significant amounts of freight. They are not fast, but are really a blast to ride.

The problem with the older Tundras (as I see it) is that they don't have the ergonomics of the new sleds. If you have a bad back etc..... they are not that comfortable.

The BEST part about Tundras is their simplicity. If you are new to snow machining, they are a GREAT learning tool! They are simple and will lead you to where you want to be.

The WORST thing to do when starting to snowmachine is to get the WRONG machine the first time out. With the reliability, ease of maintenence and general ridability of the Tundra, it is a fine machine for the first timer!

The price is what the market will bear. Condition of the trailer is important. Tundras sell fast if priced correctly. Use the search function, there are numerous threads about them.

PM me if you have any questions.

Mike
 

mit

New member
Joined
Nov 25, 2007
Messages
732
Reaction score
27
Location
Fairbanks
I bought Two Tundras and a trailer package from Compeaus in 1992. One was a long track one short track. I still have the short track at a remote cabin and every time I ride it I cuss it! It is under powered, doesn't break trail worth a dang, Last winter the drive clutch went out. couple years ago I lost the whole under carriage and track. Parts are getting real hard to find; I couldn't even buy cowling hold downs form the dealer. Both fuel tanks cracked in the tread area of the caps, the first couple of years. The replacement tanks have been OK since. I have had the oh they are great trapping machine conversation with a bunch of folks. My first question is have you ever ridden any other machine?
 

Dirtofak

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
2,267
Reaction score
165
Location
Beaver Creek
What is the track length on the Tundras that you are looking at. MIT brought up a VERY important tidbit of info. If they are short tracks, they are worth considerably less and are not for boondocking and are probably most at home on a groomed trail or lake.

If you are getting older or have back/shoulder/knee issues, look at the newer machines that are more ergonomically friendly. They don't have as much windshield, but are much easier to ride (IMO). Right now my desired machine is my sons 2008 550F Tundra. It rides great!

Mike
 

12bhntn

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
46
Reaction score
0
Tundra's

Tundra's

Thanks for the replies, the machines are Tundra Long Tracks and they look practically new. I have been kicking around the newer models for the reasons listed but these sure look clean for a fraction of the price. I thank you for your responses...
 

swapdonkey

New member
Joined
Feb 10, 2007
Messages
483
Reaction score
21
Location
Los Anchorage
I think that the tundras are the best machine ever. The first thing I would do is take off the oiler and mix the gas. It is the weaks link in the whole snow machine. It is just a plastic gear and is located on the side of the rewind. Then you can cut the oil tank in half and make a warm storage tank. I put extra socks and thin gloves in mine. Check and make sure that the clets on the track are not rubbing the wheels and the track is in good shape. Give the undercarage a few squirts of grease at the zinks. They are the most reliable machine out there, if you take care of them. I also think that they are the easiest machine to work on. They get about 10 MPG even towing a heavy load. If you get it stuck you can pick it up. Carry a rop-a-long with you and there is no place that you can't you. You might want to avoid overflow, dont ask how I know. I cut the foam in half for the seat and made a storage compartment for my rope along and what not. I have three snow machines and it is my go to machine. Now I do use mine for trapping, ice fishing, and hunting. I'm not out boondocking and it doesnt go fast, but I have always made it there and back and mine is a 1993. I have had it ten years and I bet there is 7000 miles on it and it runs just as strong as it did new. I also think that they keep there value better then any other snow machine out there. At least in Alaska they do.
 

byrd_hntr

New member
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
658
Reaction score
33
Location
Squarebanks
I think that the tundras are the best machine ever. The first thing I would do is take off the oiler and mix the gas. It is the weaks link in the whole snow machine. It is just a plastic gear and is located on the side of the rewind. Then you can cut the oil tank in half and make a warm storage tank. I put extra socks and thin gloves in mine. Check and make sure that the clets on the track are not rubbing the wheels and the track is in good shape. Give the undercarage a few squirts of grease at the zinks. They are the most reliable machine out there, if you take care of them. I also think that they are the easiest machine to work on. They get about 10 MPG even towing a heavy load. If you get it stuck you can pick it up. Carry a rop-a-long with you and there is no place that you can't you. You might want to avoid overflow, dont ask how I know. I cut the foam in half for the seat and made a storage compartment for my rope along and what not. I have three snow machines and it is my go to machine. Now I do use mine for trapping, ice fishing, and hunting. I'm not out boondocking and it doesnt go fast, but I have always made it there and back and mine is a 1993. I have had it ten years and I bet there is 7000 miles on it and it runs just as strong as it did new. I also think that they keep there value better then any other snow machine out there. At least in Alaska they do.

ditto....

Simple reliable machine. They just don't make a machine like this anymore.
 

mit

New member
Joined
Nov 25, 2007
Messages
732
Reaction score
27
Location
Fairbanks
Yea they do, you can still buy a Bravo same way it was 20 years ago. I lied about mine they are 93's and I have a 96 440 Bearcat that makes the Tundra's look like a toys. When there is work to do it beats the begeesus out of the tundra. And it is just as easy to work on.
 

Dirtofak

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
2,267
Reaction score
165
Location
Beaver Creek
Yea they do, you can still buy a Bravo same way it was 20 years ago. I lied about mine they are 93's and I have a 96 440 Bearcat that makes the Tundra's look like a toys. When there is work to do it beats the begeesus out of the tundra. And it is just as easy to work on.

The old Beatcats have a great rep. I don't think that would boondock as well as the newer style Tundra 300F/550F though.

Mike
 

Mr. Pid

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
3,294
Reaction score
113
Location
Anchorage
I still miss my old Tundra II. I can't think of a better sled for general short distance utility work. You ride Tundras on your knees. When you get too cold you can hide from the wind by sitting but pretty soon your back will hurt and you'll be back on your knees. They're tough, they go through the snow when nothing else will, and they're light enough for one guy to get one unstuck. If I was cruising the rivers from the parking lot to a cabin I'd much rather have something bigger, more stable, and more comfortable. If I was going through the woods to cut firewood or check traps? Nothing beats a Tundra. Especially if you're going alone. Try to get a wide track unstuck by yourself! :eek:
 

Dirtofak

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
2,267
Reaction score
165
Location
Beaver Creek
I was thinking that a 550F Summit with a 144 or more geared down would be pretty awesome. Lightweight, fan cooled, ergo styling and light. Basically my 300F with more power, better front suspension and longer track. Either that or put a 380 motor in mine.....
 

Alaskan22

New member
Joined
Apr 7, 2009
Messages
787
Reaction score
65
Location
Gnome, Ak
Skandic 440LT. Best machine out there! Big, long, track. Wide skis, narrow stance (agility). Single carb = great gas mileage. Light weight = easy to unstick when stuck (if you ever get stuck). Has reverse. And the 440 is a POWERFUL engine that can haul anything you attach to it (unlike the Tundras).
 

rimfirematt

New member
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
2,334
Reaction score
142
Location
Eagle River
I still miss my old Tundra II. I can't think of a better sled for general short distance utility work. You ride Tundras on your knees. When you get too cold you can hide from the wind by sitting but pretty soon your back will hurt and you'll be back on your knees. They're tough, they go through the snow when nothing else will, and they're light enough for one guy to get one unstuck. If I was cruising the rivers from the parking lot to a cabin I'd much rather have something bigger, more stable, and more comfortable. If I was going through the woods to cut firewood or check traps? Nothing beats a Tundra. Especially if you're going alone. Try to get a wide track unstuck by yourself! :eek:

This is my thoughts as well. I have logged a ton of hours on a 1990 tundra 250. They are pretty different to ride than most new machines. You use your knees and lean more than actually turn the skiis. They lack hill climbing power. Other than that super dependable, go on any snow conditions and sip the gas.
 

byrd_hntr

New member
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
658
Reaction score
33
Location
Squarebanks
Skandic 440LT. Best machine out there! Big, long, track. Wide skis, narrow stance (agility). Single carb = great gas mileage. Light weight = easy to unstick when stuck (if you ever get stuck). Has reverse. And the 440 is a POWERFUL engine that can haul anything you attach to it (unlike the Tundras).

I agree but try to find one! At least once in a while you see a Tundra come up for sale, I very rarely see a 440 LT for sale. Maybe it because the owners never get ride of them.
 

Latest posts

Top