oar saddles or row saddles for a pro pioneer?

bbags

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I searched through some old threads discussing the differences between row saddles and oar saddles. But, I'm looking to find out, now that folks have had a few years to "field test them", which set up they prefer for their pro pioneers.

Thanks,

bbags
 

mrgsholly

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I have several pro pioneers in my rental fleet that have the saddles with them. Im sure we can work something out if you wanted to try the saddles for a day without actually purchasing them. honestly in my experience the boat handles best with paddlers one in the front and one in the back.
 

kk alaska

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Would like to try a pair on my new Saturn Kaboat 50 " wide.
 

mrgsholly

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Would like to try a pair on my new Saturn Kaboat 50 " wide.
yup let me know when you want to do so and we will work something out..... I have a kaboat I am urathaning the bottom on now and am noticing that there might be a lack of d-rings(none) to strap them down. so you will have to figure a way to strap them down. the pro pioneer has 8 d-rings....two inside and two outside on each tube to make a total of eight just for the saddles to strap to.
 

kk alaska

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What motor are you going to run on your Kaboat ? I need to come up with a little taller seat and floor to knee bend is low and tends to cramp your knees on long runs. 8 to 10 Hp is about ideal based on about 20 hrs run time with both last year. Brian sold 30 of them this year so will be interesting to get feedback and mods that are done. I want to come up with a motor lift this spring to run the shallow water.
 

mrgsholly

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its not my boat Im just working on it...I always thought theses style boats(kaboats) would be best in shallow water with a mudd buddy style motor or a surface drive but yet to see someone put it together. The customer that dropped this kaboat off is putting a 20hp jet on it and is a little concerned about getting clean water to the jet foot. This seems to be the biggest issue with inflatable jet boats. Most folks I run into with these boats end up with a short shaft prop and under 20 hp.
 

kk alaska

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The Kaboat if you keep the floor inflated to 9 # plus does not have the normal inflatable bottom issues with cavitation, bottom seems
like a hard bottom boat. Running prop trim had to be at lowest position or it would slightly cavitate on turns.

I would install a couple d rings and straps to keep stress off transom with a jet and tryh and keep motor weight not over 125#. Also think you need a clean intake to prevent cavitation. Would like to see the Jet Ranger inflatable with a drop stitch floor for improved performance.
 

Michael Strahan

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The Kaboat if you keep the floor inflated to 9 # plus does not have the normal inflatable bottom issues with cavitation, bottom seems
like a hard bottom boat. Running prop trim had to be at lowest position or it would slightly cavitate on turns.

I would install a couple d rings and straps to keep stress off transom with a jet and tryh and keep motor weight not over 125#. Also think you need a clean intake to prevent cavitation. Would like to see the Jet Ranger inflatable with a drop stitch floor for improved performance.

My biggest issue with drop-stitch floors is the possibility of popped threads, which create a bulge on both the top and the bottom of the floor that is very difficult to repair. Popped threads occur when you run over a hard object (usually a rock), and the bottom layer of the floor stops while the top keeps moving slightly. The strain is too much and threads break. Here is photo of a drop-stitch floor that I saw on the showroom floor of a local boat company some years ago. You can see that even when new, some threads had already broken. No, it's not super common, but when it does happen, this is what you get:

View attachment 69842

-Mike
 

kk alaska

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Mike, the drop stich hi pressure floor is around $200 if it breaks I will replace it. Air pressure holds it in place thinking
if you hit something hard enough it would come out position before stitching broke. Added performance more than makes up
for any potential problems in my opinion. But time will tell. Kurt
 

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