New Haven CRF extraction issue

secondbarrel

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Bought my first CRF gun that WAS NOT a surplus mauser or a commercial FN variant, or a pre-64. In other words my first "newish" Model 70 - a New Haven reintroduced CRF (six digit G- prefix with blued steel extractor). The grip of the case is looser than in any of the previously mentioned guns; so much so that the claw will let go if I extract too slowly, leaving the case sitting on top of the subsequent rounds. When I extract smartly it does its job perfectly but my experience with all of the other CRF guns is very different. With an FN or pre-64 I can literally pull the bolt completely out of the action and it will still have a firm grip on the round which will be hanging on to the bolt. The price you pay of course is a stiffer motion when closing the bolt because of the tighter clearances between boltface, claw, and case. Nothing's for free and it is a small price for such positive control.

Is this pretty common now with any of the post-1991 (Don't hold me to that exact year you model 70 guys) guns from New Haven? Is there a fix? If so, I hope it is just an extractor swap and we're not talking welding up and recutting the boltface. As I say, now that I know the rifle's habits, I can live with it. I'm not chasing man-eaters. I'm looking for experienced responses from gunsmiths; not guesses. Thanks guys
 
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Alaska Bush Hunter

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Control Round feed CRF works a little different than push Fed win 70. I have had both over the years. Still have my 1979 push feed works great over the years no problem Win 70 XTR 30-06. If yours is a Pre 64 type CRF it will hold the round.
 

iofthetaiga

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Bought my first CRF gun that WAS NOT a surplus mauser or a commercial FN variant, or a pre-64. In other words my first "newish" Model 70 - a New Haven reintroduced CRF (six digit G- prefix with blued steel extractor). The grip of the case is looser than in any of the previously mentioned guns; so much so that the claw will let go if I extract too slowly, leaving the case sitting on top of the subsequent rounds. When I extract smartly it does its job perfectly but my experience with all of the other CRF guns is very different. With an FN or pre-64 I can literally pull the bolt completely out of the action and it will still have a firm grip on the round which will be hanging on to the bolt. The price you pay of course is a stiffer motion when closing the bolt because of the tighter clearances between boltface, claw, and case. Nothing's for free and it is a small price for such positive control.

Is this pretty common now with any of the post-1991 (Don't hold me to that exact year you model 70 guys) guns from New Haven? Is there a fix? If so, I hope it is just an extractor swap and we're not talking welding up and recutting the boltface. As I say, now that I know the rifle's habits, I can live with it. I'm not chasing man-eaters. I'm looking for experienced responses from gunsmiths; not guesses. Thanks guys
I have several of these, with G2, G3, and G6 s/n's, and find that they will sometimes do exactly as you describe...if I retract the bolt extremely slowly. Mine are 100% reliable at any speed above dead slow. Not an issue for me, and I can't speak to a potential "fix".
 
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moose338

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My model 70's can replicate "flaw" this as well. However you have to pull to bolt back so slowly to do it, I can't see it ever being an issue in actual use. You pretty much can't do it unless you try.
 

secondbarrel

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Same here. I only bring it up because a 9,3 x 57 Husqvarna is fitted so perfectly, slow or fast the cartridge, loaded or fired, is "glued" to the bolt as you extract, fast or crawling, which I guess is a testament to the workmanship of these old, commercial Mausers.
 

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