Is the 375 H&H?

SmokeRoss

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It's so very nice to open up a moose with no damage to the body.
Yes. Yes it is. Other than where the arrow went clean through. It's also nice to get one to the road whole. Bring it back to the shop. Hose it off inside and out with a fire hose while it hangs from the loader forks. Then hang it in the shop and skin it and have it looking like a beef hanging, all clean and such. I think we have only packed 2 moose in the past 20 or so years. We bring along the gear to drag them out if at all possible. Recently bought some rope used for haywire by loggers in the PNW with a 20,000 pound break strength. It will take the place of the halibut ground line we have been using. Back in the day in the PNW we used 3/8's haywire/strawline cable on elk. 250' sections. Lay out 3-4 of those sections. Hang a block in a tree next to the road. Hook to the pickup bumper and take off.
 

4merguide

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Yes. Yes it is. Other than where the arrow went clean through. It's also nice to get one to the road whole. Bring it back to the shop. Hose it off inside and out with a fire hose while it hangs from the loader forks. Then hang it in the shop and skin it and have it looking like a beef hanging, all clean and such. I think we have only packed 2 moose in the past 20 or so years. We bring along the gear to drag them out if at all possible. Recently bought some rope used for haywire by loggers in the PNW with a 20,000 pound break strength. It will take the place of the halibut ground line we have been using. Back in the day in the PNW we used 3/8's haywire/strawline cable on elk. 250' sections. Lay out 3-4 of those sections. Hang a block in a tree next to the road. Hook to the pickup bumper and take off.
A few years back a friend of mine arrowed a spike not far off the road. I winched it into the back of my f250 whole. Have only done it that one time but it sure was nice.
 

SmokeRoss

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A few years back a friend of mine arrowed a spike not far off the road. I winched it into the back of my f250 whole. Have only done it that one time but it sure was nice.
We have yarded them out from hundreds of yards. Like 3-400 yards. Just need the proper gear.
 

SmokeRoss

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A few years back a friend of mine arrowed a spike not far off the road. I winched it into the back of my f250 whole. Have only done it that one time but it sure was nice.
15 or so years ago my son called me and told me of a bull they had whacked and wanted me to bring the pack boards and meat sacks. I brought a skate of halibut line. (1800 feet) Strung it out and the end disappeared into the brush. I was able to get my truck far enough into the brush to hook up. Yarded to the road. Backed up and got another grab. Went again. After a few of these we had it out. Other hunters were driving by. No one had a clue what we were doing. Probably thought we were cutting firewood. LOL.
 

SmokeRoss

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Choke them around the neck. Half hitch on the nose. Away we go. Hang a block on a tree or on the bumper of another truck. Did that on the North Road with a bow killed bull near Bishop Creek. On the highway. Only held up traffic for a bit.
 

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Politely listened and nodded respectfully when many, many experinced hunters tried to talk me into a using a 375.
"less recoil than that nasty 338WM" they said
"great stopping power" they said
" less meat damage" they said
"almost guaranteed a good blood trail, although you won't need it" they said

Well, after owning three 338WM rifles, that all shot quite good, and two of them DID kick pretty hard, I stumbled into a deal on a good 375.
I currently own 2, an older CZ that is a dream to shoot, has a 4 round magazine and a long stock that really fits me and my 6ft6'' tall son very nicely.
The other is not a true H&H; a Win. model 70 that was rebarreled to 375-06 Ackley improved. Not a magnum, but does use the excellent bullets that will do a very good job.

Then sold my sweet shooting 338 WM. My last, I will never go back!
 

shulse01

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I have a lineup of calibers, but the 375 H&H is the heavyweight. Used on brown bears with a 300 gr bonded bear claw, and loaded with 270 gr barnes bullet on elk. It drops them, DRT, first time. It is an amazing caliber, and you can break rocks at 500 yards for fun. It is no sheep caliber, but I sure like it for everything else.
 

7mmstalker

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That rifle is new to me, just a few months ago. When the weather warms up a little more, I will be making some handloads and will chronograph them. The little bit I have shot it was using ammo that came with the rifle, which was consumed getting a scope "on paper" at 100 yds.

I have some kind-of outdated books, P.O. Ackley's handbooks, that suggest some pretty hot loads, not sure I will go that far!
Most 21st century references for that cartridge, or the very similar 375 Scovill, lead me to believe 25-2600 fps with 225-250gr. slugs will be safe; the excellent 300 gr Nosler partition will probably be much slower, maybe 2300fps., likely less. That's also a pretty "tough" bullet for that velocity, so I doubt the partition will be my first choice. .375 bore has a lot of bullet options!
Hornady interlock, and Speer hot-core slugs in 225-235 gr. will be first in line for loading, accuracy will decide the favorite before the chronograph comes into play.

Velocity was the prime goal for much of my hunting and shooting years. Bullets are so good, and off the shelf rifles and barrels so well made, that lately I have been leaning toward accuracy first. I've been getting good results with cartridges like a 6.5 Grendel 120gr load, around 2500fps, that split the spine of a caribou and created enough blast to wreck both lungs pretty good too!
 

bottom_dweller

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That rifle is new to me, just a few months ago. When the weather warms up a little more, I will be making some handloads and will chronograph them. The little bit I have shot it was using ammo that came with the rifle, which was consumed getting a scope "on paper" at 100 yds.

I have some kind-of outdated books, P.O. Ackley's handbooks, that suggest some pretty hot loads, not sure I will go that far!
Most 21st century references for that cartridge, or the very similar 375 Scovill, lead me to believe 25-2600 fps with 225-250gr. slugs will be safe; the excellent 300 gr Nosler partition will probably be much slower, maybe 2300fps., likely less. That's also a pretty "tough" bullet for that velocity, so I doubt the partition will be my first choice. .375 bore has a lot of bullet options!
Hornady interlock, and Speer hot-core slugs in 225-235 gr. will be first in line for loading, accuracy will decide the favorite before the chronograph comes into play.

Velocity was the prime goal for much of my hunting and shooting years. Bullets are so good, and off the shelf rifles and barrels so well made, that lately I have been leaning toward accuracy first. I've been getting good results with cartridges like a 6.5 Grendel 120gr load, around 2500fps, that split the spine of a caribou and created enough blast to wreck both lungs pretty good too!
I love the grendel! I throated mine about a caliber deep. It lets me stick those 120, 125, and 115 barnes out so that the base of the bullet is just in the neck only. Using 33.3 grains of leverevolution gives me 2650 fps. I have custom bottom metal that excepts AICS short action mags that I had to modify for the grendel and I also had to rework the feed ramp. 125 partitions I have to file the lead tip and polymer tips needs pulled on others. It was a lot of work but during the Covid shutdown all I had was time. It has been everything I wanted in blacktail rifle. Responsible for a dozen so far.
 

SmokeRoss

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My son and I have taken a pile of moose with our .375's and some other large bore rifles. Use the wrong bullet and you will ruin a wheel barrow full of meat. We use Barnes X bullets in all our big guns. You can eat right up to the hole and they drop with one shot.
 

Vance in AK

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Now you guys have me wanting to get my 375 Ruger back in the game. Ive never killed anything with it but think I need to!
Ive got the Mod 77 Guide Gun. It shoots like a dream, but ammo sure dried up for it the last couple years.
For those of you that reload the 375 Ruger whats your go to powder/bullet combo for an all around 300yd moose/bou/bear round?
 

Doug in Alaska

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Now you guys have me wanting to get my 375 Ruger back in the game. Ive never killed anything with it but think I need to!
Ive got the Mod 77 Guide Gun. It shoots like a dream, but ammo sure dried up for it the last couple years.
For those of you that reload the 375 Ruger whats your go to powder/bullet combo for an all around 300yd moose/bou/bear round?
Barnes 270 gr TSX FB
73.5 gr RL15
Federal GM215M
This load has worked very well for me in 375 Ruger
 

LeonardC

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I'm going to be working up a load of Hornady CX 250 grain for up to about 300 yards and a secondary load of Hornady 270 grain Interlock for 300 yards and beyond (IF I can get them to print where I want them). Powder to be determined. Primers...I've got some CCI Mags. stashed away, hope I can find some more!
 

Redlander

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Redlander: Nice bear and great performance out of your bullet. The CX replaces the GMX. Looking at your results, I'm on the right track.
That bullet penetrated from the right hip to the “elbow” of the left front leg, where it stopped, breaking that leg. All at a lasered 125 yards.
 

4merguide

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Not that your 250 grn GMX isn’t a good slug, but personally if it were me and I had that caliber to hunt Kodiak brown bears with, I’d go for a heavier slug that the caliber is capable of. The shoulder mass to get through and into the vitals on a 9-10’ brown bear boar is beyond impressive. I wouldn’t expect the 250 to penetrate a big brownie like it did that griz, but I’m sure you know that. There’s a lot to be said about the killing power of a heavy slug inside a hundred yards on a big bear. JMHO. Good luck on your hunt!
 

SmokeRoss

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Not that your 250 grn GMX isn’t a good slug, but personally if it were me and I had that caliber to hunt Kodiak brown bears with, I’d go for a heavier slug that the caliber is capable of. The shoulder mass to get through and into the vitals on a 9-10’ brown bear boar is beyond impressive. I wouldn’t expect the 250 to penetrate a big brownie like it did that griz, but I’m sure you know that. There’s a lot to be said about the killing power of a heavy slug inside a hundred yards on a big bear. JMHO. Good luck on your hunt!
I shot a 9 1/2 foot brownie with an old Winchester model 71 in .348. They aren't made of steel. (the brownies that is)
 

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