Advice on using Chrony

shimano 33

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I decided to take on the reloading hobby almost a year ago due to the expansive ammo shortage and have had great success (thanks to multiple forum members on advice and even sparring supplies during the darkest days). The knowledge found here is what keeps me coming back and is the case now!

The chronograph I ordered just arrived at the doorstep and is begging me to zing some rounds though it. But before I race off to Birchwood and look like a fool with the thing, I figured I would receive some sound advice here.

Questions:

-I did some background research and it looks like the apparatus needs sun to operate correctly. Tomorrow is supposed to be partly sunny, but is that good enough on a winter day?
-Should I wait to shoot when the sun is at its highest point?
-Does anyone recommend putting something under the chrono to prevent glare? If so, what?
-Sounds like 10 foot may be the best distance to start with?

Any input would be greatly appreciated!


Mark
 

Hoyt-Hunter

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My chronograph works when it's cloudy out and it is a twenty year old Beta.

I have never place anything under it to reduce glare. It should come with diffusers though, to use for very sunny/bright days. Rarely use them though.

I place my chrono about 6-8 feet out on a tripod. Just make sure of you alignment for bullet travel, keeping the path between the diffuser sticks and about half way up the stick. I have a single piece cleaning rod that I stick partially in the end of my automatics to help to see the alignment, otherwise take the bolt out of bolt action rifle and look down the barrel, making sure to line up everything with the target.

Hope it helps to get you started.


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Smokey

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I blew the diffusers up 20 plus years ago by shooting a 300 wmag to close and used it all these years without any. However I did have days with no readings issues, usually bright sun middle of the day - so I built a very simply 4 sided 2 x 12 box and painted the inside top with enamel white paint and have had perfect success ever since no matter what kind of day.
Play with it some and you will find a sweet spot - about 10 - 12 feet is what I try to set up... Remember the scope will be well above the bbl so if you have a bolt gun doesn't hurt to pull the bolt and look down the bore if you think you might shoot your equipment... If you do you won't be the first or last! :) Have fun!
 

Float Pilot

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I own two chronographs. There have been times when I had to lay a brown tarp on the snow because it was so sunny that the bullet could not make a shadow when traveling over the sensors.
There have also been days when the sun was at an angle that caused me to either not obtain any readings or I observed obviously false readings.

I usually have mine about 8 to 10 feet ahead of the muzzle. Sometimes high powered rifle loads will blast powder particles acirss the senors and give you super high readings.

Watch out for shooting your chrony.... Been there and have down that....
 

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shimano 33

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Thanks guys!

Just returned from Birchwood and avoided capping the chrony. Had readings on all shots exept the first (not sure what happened) so must have done somethin right.

The main reason I purchased it was for my 325wsm, I have not been able to find brass so I converted some 300wsm and had no clue what the change would do on velocity, pressure, ect... The chrony revealed that I was up to projected velocity a lot earlier than I would have expected. In fact I was only able to shoot my first group of handloads Due to light extraction marks on brass and already pushing 3000 fps with 200gr. Bullets. Now that I have a bench mark I'm excited for more testing.
 

.338 mag.

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Don't loan it out to friends that shoot it. Use it to work up to a safe and consistent load that results in good accuracy for it's intended purpose and not to get the last possible 40 fps mv. Verify it's alleged trajectory by shooting at extended ranges. They are a neat tool for the hand loader. Have fun!
 

Hoyt-Hunter

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One of the most important features of your chrono for hand loading is the standard deviation data you get. This data is measure of your batch uniformity performance. If you are a stickler about accuracy you're goal is a standard deviation as small as possible, zero being perfect but nearly impossible. If you are pushing near max velocity, you will have difficulty trying to achieve a reliable standard deviation. After all, the key to accuracy is consistency.


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Smitty of the North

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One of the most important features of your chrono for hand loading is the standard deviation data you get. This data is measure of your batch uniformity performance. If you are a stickler about accuracy you're goal is a standard deviation as small as possible, zero being perfect but nearly impossible. If you are pushing near max velocity, you will have difficulty trying to achieve a reliable standard deviation. After all, the key to accuracy is consistency.


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I have it on good authority, not my own because I don't bother with it, that the most accurate loads are not always the ones with the smallest SD.

SOTN
 

rbuck351

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I have found that coloring the bullets black with a black permanent marker helps the sensors get a reading on those days when the sun isn't just right.
 
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