26' Hewes Alaskan

TriIron

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TriIron
Nice set up! I have a 24' pacific cruiser with that new Yamaha 300 and love it. While breaking it in on a local lake this summer, I hit 55mph GPS speed! I went with the T-25 kicker and couldn't be happier.
Storman-After sseing your post and what you are running for a kicker, a lot of thinking and reading on this I decided to go with the Yami T25 instead of the T9.9. While neighter of these kickers will get the boat up on plane and my maximum hull speed (about 7knts calculated so say 6knts actual) won't change I am sure that if we are beating against a head wind I'd much rather have the extra ponies (inwhich case the extra HP of the 25 would keep the boat at least near the hull speed-whereas the 9.9 might not be able to). And if we do have to limp home I'd much rather be doing so at 4K rather than at WOT. At any rate the price difference isn't enough to make it a deal killer and the extra weight is more than made up for in the big single vs the twins. Now I just need to wait to get my new boat wet.....
 
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Just purchased a 2007 Dodge 2500 turbo diesel...
Off topic but with the 2006 and newer diesels with the Bosch injectors, invest in a ultra-fine after market filter. The Bosche injectors will gouge with the OEM fuel filter. At $550 each, the aftermarket cost is peanuts.
 

archertom

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The dealers push twins for one reason, profits. A single with kicker is way more economical all the way around, granted the kicker represents a slow return to port but a return under power is way better then a tow. My kicker ties into my main with a snap on rod, it also charges the batteries and I can use the autopilot. So yes the trip home will be slow but relatively painless. I think of the kicker as a $2000 insurance policy hanging on the transom, way less expensive then having two large outboards that could both be disabled under certain conditions, than what do you do?

Answer: Twins with a kicker :topjob:
 

archertom

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Nope, got 2634 hrs on my Hewes (original motors) and I would never hesitate to buy another.
Aluminum is king here for what we do. With trim tabs my boat will handle weather that keeps the charter fleet in the bay. Is that fun? No it isn't but I have complete faith in its low center of gravity and capability.
They are often under appreciated but I put on 1000 hrs per season and I think I'm fairly qualified to say although they lack flair they are great at what they do. I just need a bit bigger boat with a head but need to get the economy I do now (6-7.7 gph total).
If I was chartering longer offshore fishing trips yeah I'd love a Parker. They are awesome and have seen them handle heavy weather.

As for the twins vs single, I just like the twins. Torque is nice for heavy loads, sounds great when synced, and it's not common to whack something that takes out both motors although you would think that being they are mounted close together, just doesn't happen often at all considering all the tidal places and multiple beach landings 7 days a week thru the summer. As stated, go with twins that will plane the boat on one. No one has mentioned prop pitch and that's crucial to getting the boat on step even with not high hp motors. Everyone should carry spare props and not a bad idea to carry em with higher pitched props.
I have 4 different set of props and each has its place.

Except for the possibility of the new 200 yamaha 2.8 there isn't a 200 hp motor I know of that will touch the economy I get at 22-24 kts.
The boat just plain defies logic when it comes to the economy I get with 19" pitch props. As the season lightens up on heavy loads, will scotch to 21" props. Better cruise mph at same rpm's.

I agree, especially with the statement highlighted in red. I've seen first hand what happens out around Crafton Is. in the sound when an inattentive skipper clips a rock, it hit the port lower unit and banged up the skeg and prop, completely missed the starboard lower unit. Had it been much more, I can see how one engine would've been completely out of commission while the other is good to go. And, as far as twins, they just look and sound [email protected]$$ too !
 
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roybekks

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Trim tabs

Trim tabs

Nope, got 2634 hrs on my Hewes (original motors) and I would never hesitate to buy another.
Aluminum is king here for what we do. With trim tabs my boat will handle weather that keeps the charter fleet in the bay. Is that fun? No it isn't but I have complete faith in its low center of gravity and capability.
They are often under appreciated but I put on 1000 hrs per season and I think I'm fairly qualified to say although they lack flair they are great at what they do. I just need a bit bigger boat with a head but need to get the economy I do now (6-7.7 gph total).
If I was chartering longer offshore fishing trips yeah I'd love a Parker. They are awesome and have seen them handle heavy weather........


big jim, or others:

Is the trim adjustment on the twin motors not enough, that is why you have trim tabs as well? I am having an aluminum boat built (roughly 27') with twin outboards. I had a 19' almar that would trim bow-down more than I ever needed with the motor (no tabs on it). I am curious if I should be thinking about trim tabs as well or just add them later if I need them... Thanks !
 

bkmail

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Have a 27' boat with twins, no need for trim tabs. If she's running with a slight list it's eaily corrected with with trimming one motor slightly but that is not very often!
Bk
 

Big Jim

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All due respect to bk, I'll never have another boat without tabs. I'd put them on now although it's not usually too difficult to install later.
Hold the phone; it all depends on how the transom and outboard bracket (if equipped) is set up. You wanna make sure there is enough lateral room to install them as far outboard of the centerline as possible, hope that makes sense.
I put a pair on a 28' Koffler I had and was limited to a 10" wide tab (12" better) because of the existing extended transom setup.
I'm now at 3100 hrs on this boat and I've come to love the trim tabs more & more; not just to correct a list although that's important to me running the boat as a water taxi; you try to load it just right but sometimes it's piled with so much gear or people running back and forth to look at whales, otters, etc I can correct effectively all the time.
Also here's where they really shine: running in rough water and big boat wakes.
At cruising speed I rarely slow down when crossing big steep wakes (a lot here) just by listing the boat one way or the other with the tabs; you end up not slapping the waves and beating up your clients and yet still stay on step.
Same for the day breezes which can beat you up, I often will run for miles listing on purpose to port or starboard and same results; no slapping the hull with waves just by changing the angle of attack so to speak.
Come on down anytime to Homer and I'll take you out for a spin to clarify all this. Also I can stay on step at like 13kts using the tabs in rough water, smooths out the ride big time.
 

Rob B

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That is some interesting info Big Jim. I love my trim tabs. I use them more to raise or lower my bow depending on the water. I'll be sure to try listing in tough water and see how that goes.


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bkmail

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Big Jim,
Completely understand what you are saying, no offense taken. My previous boat was a bayliner explorer, it had tabs and we not only used them but neeed them to run efficiently as well as for many of the same reasons you mentioned above. The tabs allowed us to bury the bow and run chop, or balance it out when we moved around (very sensitive port to stern with weight), as well as list to keep chop from slapping the hull.
However, the Wooldridge super sport pilot house I have now rarely, if ever requires any adjustment while running to keep her level. I have installed reverse chines in the bow for the 1st 5' so I can run chop or cross a moderate wake at speed and keep the window clean, these chines are completely out of the water. Their only purpose is to deflect spray off the bow (dig through threads and you'll find pics of them about a year ago, installed by greatland welding). She is the steadiest boat I have been in its class, meaning we can walk around while sitting or cruising and it does not list or require adjustment. Must be how they build them with the deadrise and reverse chine only on the back 1/2 of the boat. If the chines on the bottom run all the way to the front, then you will have that loud slapping sound while running chop or crossing waves. When we bought her, I was planning to install a set of tabs soon enough. I have been pleasantly suprised and am very glad I don't need them.
Again, on the rare event I need to correct a list, I can trim one of the motors slightly and get the desired effect. I enjoy not having them as its one less mechanical thing I need to maintain or service, be aware of when loading or unloading, or break if I decide to put her on dry ground for tide.

So, I think its simply a matter of how the boat is constructed, its use to the operator, as to whether or not they are needed. Some boats need 'em, others don't!

Bk
 
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