2 Mile shoot

Chez

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From what I understand he used some sort of super scope with built in laser and built in computer to do the calculations.
 

rjburk

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IF he used the S&B scope he needed a 30 MIL canted rail to get there......shot required at least 52 MIL holdover or about 550 feet....S&B scope only has 26 MIL of total elevation which you will lose some just to zero rifle....very lucky shot.....
 

BrownBear

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Yeah. Memorable but lucky. I'll always celebrate luck, but recognize it for what it is.

Reminds me of a youthful shot I made, back when "wheels" for me were pedaled with no engine noises.

Buds and I had finished a day of pretty poor jackrabbit hunting and come back to our bikes next to a fence. Waaaaaaay out there I could just make out a flop ear sitting upright. I laid my old Sears and Robucky single shot, open sighted 22 across a handy fence post to the jeering of my buds. Held 30' or 40' high and popped off a round. Dunno the flight time, but it was long enough for a bud to finally say "You missed."

Then that amazing jackrabbit flopped over and lay there kicking up dust. It took us something like 5 minutes just to walk over to it. Perfect head shot just behind the right eye. I'm not even sure that little lead pill exited. But the shot made me a young legend!:whistle:
 

elmerkeithclone

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I think we have all thrown a hail mary that actually landed on what we threw it at. Extreme Kentucky windage may be claimed by some but I used the swag method on my far out shots that landed. 2.2 miles....you'd have to figure in how fast the earth was turning in that shot. Or be very very lucky and I'm going with that if the whole thing isn't just a hoax to put the Canadian snipers on the top of the pile.
 

JOAT

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The topic that is all the rage this week is the Coriolis Effect. Everyone is suddenly concerned about how the Earth's rotation is affecting their long range shooting. I'm gonna have to toss down the chest-thumping BS card and say it doesn't matter nearly as much as you might think. If this guy was shooting toward one of the cardinal points of the compass, the claim is that the bullet will be deflected up to something like 10-12 inches (laterally north or south, vertically east or west). That might be true, if you are doing the math by starting the bullet from a fixed point in space with it moving toward a target that is moving along the surface of a sphere. However, the bullet isn't starting at a fixed point in space. The bullet is moving at the same speed and in the same direction as the target. If the target is north of the gun and moving at 750mph to the west, don't forget that the gun is also moving at 750mph to the west. The mass of air that the bullet is moving through is also tracking with the Earth's rotation, plus/minus all the local wind effects. The wind, gravity, and air resistance are going to have the greatest influence on the bullet travel. By comparison, the rotation of the Earth just ain't going to do enough to worry about in the calculations. The pulse bounce from your radial artery is going to cause more error in your hold and trigger press when you're trying to pull off shots over 3,450 meters.

I believe there is a slight correction based on Coriolis that the computer uses when firing artillery. This correction is used because you're firing a bullet on a rather significant upward arc that is going to be traveling on the order of 20 miles or more. There's actually time and distance for some rotational forces to make a difference.
 

elmerkeithclone

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In the same way that say, Ukrainians are Russians.

Ya just made coffee come out my nose.😂 Warped sense of humor I guess.

A rich farmer just north of here was unable to have any children so he adopted two teenage boys one from 🇷🇺 and one from 🇺🇦 thinking he was getting the sons that he had always wanted......or a couple of farm hands. All those boys did for the next 4 years is try to kill each other. At least one of them is in the slammer because he came real close to offing the other.

I always wondered how you Ak folk felt about Canadians. You have me grinning from ear to ear.😁
 

BrownBear

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Bud of mine puts it this way: Canada is between us and the Lower 48. Thanks Canada! :proud:
 

.338 mag.

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I like about every Canadian conservative I have met and I also appreciate the buffer zone...............
 

astroturf3040

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[

I believe there is a slight correction based on Coriolis that the computer uses when firing artillery. This correction is used because you're firing a bullet on a rather significant upward arc that is going to be traveling on the order of 20 miles or more. There's actually time and distance for some rotational forces to make a difference.[/QUOTE]

Interesting stuff. I spent some time around the M1A Fire Control Computer. A analog machine from the 30's. sent Line of Fire Line of sight corrections to the shipboard gun mounts. Crew entered in calculated muzzle velocities of the projectiles, the gunfire director fed data from fire control radar or optical to the M1A, which continuously kept mount on target. 5"38 CAL mounts shot about 8 miles, plus AA capable to a point. 16" 50 CAL mount had effective range of 27 miles with AP rounds. Fuze setter in the 5" mount set the fuze data for the projectiles as directed. VT Frag for AA, HE rounds on naval gunfire support rounds. Bigger targets, which where moving, often firing while moving at high speeds. Shooting at shore was a leisurely 4 knots during practice rounds.

I understand all the calculations were hand computed in the 30's for the new guns systems by a large bank of female computers, solving the gunfire solutions by hand. These solutions were built into the gearing and settings on the Mk1 and later Mk1A computer. The machine was huge, about 5 ft tall and shiny brass gear knobs and dials all over the front for data input by the FireControlmen.
Never saw much about Coriolis effect of Ballistic Coefficients in the Rate Training Manuals. temperature was a big thing, rounds fired out of the barrels, parallex on the multiple controlled mounts. All that stuff is on your phone now.

Overall, Great shot, Shows value of the rifleman.
 

gunbugs

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As I've heard said at some point in the past,"Aimed rifle fire can be a real Bi**h."
 

HEMLOCK

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As I've heard said at some point in the past,"Aimed rifle fire can be a real Bi**h."
Went to a long range shoot a couple of weeks ago, the
shooter who won hit a 36" plate 3 out of 5 shots at 3800 yards. More than two miles, most guys in the competition shot 375 Cheytacs.
 

AK Bearcat

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Went to a long range shoot a couple of weeks ago, the
shooter who won hit a 36" plate 3 out of 5 shots at 3800 yards. More than two miles, most guys in the competition shot 375 Cheytacs.

More details!!!! Where was this shoot? I can not even see a 36" plate at that range!!!!!!
 

elmerkeithclone

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I was trying to think where a person would go in this state to shoot 2 miles without shooting over another person's head...... I don't think it could happen.

I remember Keith Rose telling me that he sold three Sharps rifles courtesy of Quigley Down Under. I also know a school teachers that thinks Bigfoot is real because they caught one on the History Channel........but he got away! 2 miles.....a hope and a poke!
 

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