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Thread: DIY Stand question

  1. #1
    Member TintedSnow's Avatar
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    Default DIY Stand question

    New baiter here. This may be a dumb question, but are you allowed to build you own stand? I'm not too big a fan of ladder or climbing stands or anything and I enjoy making things like this. Are you allowed to bring in lumber or use felled timber and make a stand of your own? If so, do you have to take it down at the end of the season? I know you have to remove equipment, but would this count? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    The answer will depend on where your stand is.
    As in who manages the land.
    In your on a wildlife refuge then no you cannot build one.
    But on private land it's perfectly fine.
    Others may have different rules( forest service, blm,etc.).

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  3. #3

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    Wonder why anyone would build one........when there a hundreds prebuilt......most come with one or two bear baiting barrels, still chained to trees. I know of roughly twenty between mile 3 and mile 11.5 of the Hope Road. And that is just on one side of the Hope Road. One even comes with a 20 foot extension ladder. Some have chairs, some have a roof to keep you dry, one had curtains. Some still have trail cameras.

    And yes, this is Chugach National Forest land. They do not care. Their priority is employing administrative city personal, and reducing Federal Law Enforcement Officers.
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  4. #4
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Wonder why anyone would build one........when there a hundreds prebuilt......most come with one or two bear baiting barrels, still chained to trees. I know of roughly twenty between mile 3 and mile 11.5 of the Hope Road. And that is just on one side of the Hope Road. One even comes with a 20 foot extension ladder.
    Good point!
    I was taught to "leave no trace".
    So I certainly wouldn't leave any part of it behind.
    They make a lot of good portable stands now days. I just can't see why you would want to damage some trees and leave your junk behind.
    Sorry to hear of all the slob hunters in the Hope area.

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  5. #5
    Supporting Member greyinggrayling's Avatar
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    My understanding is you can have any stand, but nothing permanent, and must be completely removed at last day of baiting season. If he brings in a hand made stand, or assembles one on-site, then as long as it is over a registered bait station and removed by the deadline, it’s not illegal. Of course nothing that would damage trees, that is understood. Where’s the regs stating no homemade stands?

  6. #6
    Member Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I own probably 20+ stands and one permeant stand. Your best bet is a portable ladder stand. A little heavier to haul in, but more comfortable. You can also then hang a strap-on while in the ladder off to the side for another hunter. We always take an extra ratchet strap for extra safety. Most tree stand accidents happen getting into/out of the stand. This is probably the safest and some have a fold up seat that helps if your a bow hunter. Still use a safety belt.

    Next is a climbing stick or ladder with a strap on stand. It helps to have a safety harness with a lineman's belt that goes around the tree. That way, if you won't fall. It is best to practice a 3-point contact. One hand, two feet. Two hands, one foot getting into any stand. You will need to use the lineman's belt and two hands to attach the stand. PRACTICE from ground level attaching the stand. When you get to the woods and are 16' up, you know what to expect. Again an extra ratchet strap offers more security. Always attach the stand so that you are stepping down onto the stand from the ladder stick. NEVER attach the stand so you have to stretch up or over to get into the stand. Often we attach a screw-in treestep off to the side for an extra hand grab.

    Some people use screw-in tree steps and the above. We have quit using them because of the labor and the safety. Think: You are 16' up and fall. All of those steps are sticking out and what would happen to you if you hit one on the way down. Many people have hung themselves on the steps and the results are not good. If you do fall, push yourself away from the tree and do a parachute roll when you hit the ground. I hate to admit it, but if it saves a live, this is from experience. 12' onto the moss out on PWS. I missed all the steps but my guts still hurt for a week afterwards from the impact.

    Climbing stands are for the younger guys with abs. The noise made with climbing, has even drawn in bucks looking for a fight. I don't use these any more either. Sometimes the base stand slips off your feet and then you have to shimmy down the tree. If not adjusted correctly as you climb the narrowing tree you end with a slanted down base. Not good, level to 5 degrees tilted up is the best grip on the tree with these.

    Don't go cheap on a safety strap. Buy a good quality harness with a lineman's belt. You don't need the lineman's unless attaching or removing stands but they are great for safety. Also buy a good bow/gun hanger. Gun hangers are shorter and test the weight of the gun on the hanger before you let it go the first time to test it. The longer foldable bow hangers, may not hold a heavier gun. You and fold them over, shorter for a firearm. Shorter U shaped hooks are great for binos and rangefinders. We hang an old screw-in tree steps for hanging packs on or coats. You also need a pull up rope for your firearm or bow. On our ladder stands we have two. We often walk in, in a light shirt and carry our coats so as to not overheat coming to the stand. One company makes a pull up rope with some reflective fibers woven in. Really helps at a hour before sunrise sometimes.

    Have fun out there but safety first!

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  7. #7
    Member TintedSnow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I own probably 20+ stands and one permeant stand. Your best bet is a portable ladder stand. A little heavier to haul in, but more comfortable. You can also then hang a strap-on while in the ladder off to the side for another hunter. We always take an extra ratchet strap for extra safety. Most tree stand accidents happen getting into/out of the stand. This is probably the safest and some have a fold up seat that helps if your a bow hunter. Still use a safety belt.

    Next is a climbing stick or ladder with a strap on stand. It helps to have a safety harness with a lineman's belt that goes around the tree. That way, if you won't fall. It is best to practice a 3-point contact. One hand, two feet. Two hands, one foot getting into any stand. You will need to use the lineman's belt and two hands to attach the stand. PRACTICE from ground level attaching the stand. When you get to the woods and are 16' up, you know what to expect. Again an extra ratchet strap offers more security. Always attach the stand so that you are stepping down onto the stand from the ladder stick. NEVER attach the stand so you have to stretch up or over to get into the stand. Often we attach a screw-in treestep off to the side for an extra hand grab.

    Some people use screw-in tree steps and the above. We have quit using them because of the labor and the safety. Think: You are 16' up and fall. All of those steps are sticking out and what would happen to you if you hit one on the way down. Many people have hung themselves on the steps and the results are not good. If you do fall, push yourself away from the tree and do a parachute roll when you hit the ground. I hate to admit it, but if it saves a live, this is from experience. 12' onto the moss out on PWS. I missed all the steps but my guts still hurt for a week afterwards from the impact.

    Climbing stands are for the younger guys with abs. The noise made with climbing, has even drawn in bucks looking for a fight. I don't use these any more either. Sometimes the base stand slips off your feet and then you have to shimmy down the tree. If not adjusted correctly as you climb the narrowing tree you end with a slanted down base. Not good, level to 5 degrees tilted up is the best grip on the tree with these.

    Don't go cheap on a safety strap. Buy a good quality harness with a lineman's belt. You don't need the lineman's unless attaching or removing stands but they are great for safety. Also buy a good bow/gun hanger. Gun hangers are shorter and test the weight of the gun on the hanger before you let it go the first time to test it. The longer foldable bow hangers, may not hold a heavier gun. You and fold them over, shorter for a firearm. Shorter U shaped hooks are great for binos and rangefinders. We hang an old screw-in tree steps for hanging packs on or coats. You also need a pull up rope for your firearm or bow. On our ladder stands we have two. We often walk in, in a light shirt and carry our coats so as to not overheat coming to the stand. One company makes a pull up rope with some reflective fibers woven in. Really helps at a hour before sunrise sometimes.

    Have fun out there but safety first!

    Thank you for all the info! I looked around today at a ladder stand. I think I may go that route now from all your info. Much appreciated.

  8. #8
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    On some federal land such as USFWS land (which, BTW is really YOUR land), you can build your own stand from lumber or other material, but you may not use nails or screws into a tree, nor are you to alter trees. I have built several tree stands which were wired/zip-tied/ratcheted to trees and had no issue. I now use ladder stands that ratchet to trees. Funny though: the bears tear up trees pretty good around barrels, but people aren't allowed to clear any brush themselves. LOL.
    I find old tree stands all over the baiting area of KNWR, but I make sure I leave them alone and only use my own equipment. On refuge land you must clean up everything, including any bait. If you don't, you may be cited.

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