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Thread: Sea Otter problem

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default Sea Otter problem

    No surprise here ~ we are soon to hit the tipping point with these furry little bastids. If I were allowed to sell my pelts as is, or even better yet, export them overseas to global fur markets ~ I can guarantee you that me and my 3 sons could solve the Kachemak and cook inlet problem in a year. Obviously we run the risk of over harvesting in that scenario. There is a better solution than what we have now, that's for certain.

    https://www.adn.com/business-economy...of-sea-otters/
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    Nothing will change until things become drastic. Seal numbers need to go down also. Would sure be nice to be able to harvest Dungenous crabs again someday.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Time for some corrections to the MMA, a draw system with a set number of tags would pay for itself in more ways than one and should be open to any and all.
    “I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned.” Physicist ― Richard Feynman


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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    Nothing will change until things become drastic.
    Isn't that the norm these days?, ie,...let's not have a general season brown bear hunt UNTIL they start coming into downtown Soldotna in the middle of the day to feed! That finally got their attention.
    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    Seal numbers need to go down also. Would sure be nice to be able to harvest Dungenous crabs again someday.
    That's funny you say that as just the other day I asked on one of the threads if anybody thought we would ever be able to bring home dungies again from the inlet?" Years ago that was a wonderful thing while fishing for halibut!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I think all 77,000 of the little MF’ers are in Icy Strait right now. Not sure what they are counting. Our Tlingit neighbors in Hoonah keep Port Fredrick pretty well cleaned up. There isn’t a Dungeness Crab to be found outside of there.

    This topic really gets me riled. Sorry. I replied to that stakeholder group meeting on Facebook. How in the H-E double hockey sticks are folks from villages, up north, and outlying communities gonna afford to that Juneau meeting? They ain’t gonna be riding the ferry!

    My neighbor worked for ADFG when they transplanted in the 60’s. He was instrumental in it. He’s a good guy. He hangs his head when it comes up. There was a plan to keep them in check with hunting. Then the feds took over in ‘72 with the Marine Mammal Act. That was the end of that.

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Nothing will change. Look at the screaming and hollering going on over the wolves. Now imagine how riled up the antis would get if they allowed hunting of the cute cuddly otters. Something needs to change but sadly the way government works the only thing that'll change is when those ****ed otters eat everything and then die off, but by then there will be nothing left of anything for anyone.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    I take quite a few each year. I would take more but to be honest I hold back as I hate skinning those greasy pigs. A real pain to flesh and they stink to the high heavens.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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    I remember a time long ago in a far away place where a guy could set up on the beach at the mouth of an NDN river and lay waste on some stuff with the old Two Hundred and Seventy. All with the blessing of the brown brothers. Like I said, a different time and place.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I think it's a losing battle, the Marine Mammal Protection Act. does not care about economic impacts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbflyer View Post
    …..Then the feds took over in ‘72.....
    That's all you had to say....we know how the rest would end up!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    20 years ago there would be a few rafts of them over the shallows here and there. Not uncommon at all now to see big groups of them out in 30-40 fathoms beating on something or another. Lots of mammas carrying pups. Of course the Park Service bought out all the commercial crabbers that fished in Glacier Bay, and the otters own that place so no reason to put out a sport pot in there.

    Always fascinates me how the survival/flourishing of one critter is so much more important than another.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbflyer View Post
    Always fascinates me how the survival/flourishing of one critter is so much more important than another.
    I understand the premise, but it really isn't too hard to figure out. When a critter has value, it becomes important. The more value it can create, the more it will be protected and nurtured by man. Hunting conservation efforts prove this point ~ just look at Africa.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    I understand the premise, but it really isn't too hard to figure out. When a critter has value, it becomes important. The more value it can create, the more it will be protected and nurtured by man. Hunting conservation efforts prove this point ~ just look at Africa.
    I agree. However in this case, the value (if we’re talking cash) lies in the commerce created by shellfish. I’m ready to be nurturing me some crab

    Come on back to SE. I’ve got a nice landing craft and lots of ammo. If I’m allowed to skin ‘em I’d help with that when you get a load.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I remember a time long ago in a far away place where a guy could set up on the beach at the mouth of an NDN river and lay waste on some stuff with the old Two Hundred and Seventy. All with the blessing of the brown brothers. Like I said, a different time and place.
    I loved and miss that "different time and place". I wouldn't live anywhere else but Alaska, but it sure ain't the same as it was in the 60s and 70s... even 80s.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    My Dad's neighbor is a retired commercial fisherman.
    Many years ago he helped with crab studies in Kachemak Bay using his seine boat.
    He said they would often find a juvenile crab stacked up in piles on the bottom of the Bay.
    He also said the otters would find those piles and hang out until they had decimated them.
    I used to find it hard to believe that the Dungeness crab, shrimp, and the king crab have not come back to Kachemak Bay in numbers that allow us to have a small sport fishery for them.
    But when you see the sheer number of otters out there and you talk to people who have homes on the bay it's obvious they're having a pretty drastic impact.


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    KBay otters must number well in the 1000's? And that 'fleet' is out there 24/7 365. Too bad, I guess, they don't eat Irish lords which eat plenty of baby crabs too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    My Dad's neighbor is a retired commercial fisherman.
    Many years ago he helped with crab studies in Kachemak Bay using his seine boat.
    He said they would often find a juvenile crab stacked up in piles on the bottom of the Bay.
    He also said the otters would find those piles and hang out until they had decimated them.
    I used to find it hard to believe that the Dungeness crab, shrimp, and the king crab have not come back to Kachemak Bay in numbers that allow us to have a small sport fishery for them.
    But when you see the sheer number of otters out there and you talk to people who have homes on the bay it's obvious they're having a pretty drastic impact.


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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Even more reason to hate these furry bastids

    https://www.vox.com/2014/4/24/564089...s-monsters-bad
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    Even more reason to hate these furry bastids

    https://www.vox.com/2014/4/24/564089...s-monsters-bad
    Wow.....now that's pretty crazy!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Yeah, and I won't forget the bleeding heart sea otter exhibit I saw at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago after the Exxon Valdez spill. Pure propaganda! The oil spill didn't kill enough of them IMO.

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