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  • #16
    Canon 30, 40 and 50D's. Favorite lens in the IS 70-200 with Canons converters followed by the 500 F4 IS. Photographers are there own worse critic. People buying a photo rarely buy it on the images technical aspects.

    There are great photographs that sell, and there are photographs that sell well. Photographs that sell well do not have to be great photographs.

    Since my photography is my primary source of income I have the luxury of being able to buy equipment often but I just don't see any reason to constantly upgrade. When asked which equipment to purchase my standard answer is either Canon or Nikon because these are the two companies that will have what you need later down the road. I was told to purchase Canon when I started so I did. I would of been just as well off if I had started with Nikon.

    Another tip, if you are looking for a small camera to carry while in hunting, fishing, etc. Make sure it is small enough to fit easily inside a pocket otherwise it will stay in the pack and you will miss a lot of potenital shots. Been there and done that.

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    • #17
      Canon 40D, but plan to buy a 5DII plus the EF 17-40mm f/4L in the near future. Will use the 5DII for things like portraits, pets, people in general, Auroras, and for landscapes. Will continue using the 40D for wildlife.

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      • #18
        I have a sony A200. Not as nice as some, but it works for me, can't see dropping more money! I am drooling over some nicer lenses, but whenever I see the pricetag I cry a bit!

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        • #19
          So, I'd like some opinions from you guys, tho you are mostly in a league above where I am at,

          I'm curious, what you would advise, if upgrading to a DSLR from my little Canon Powershot 1200is with 10.0 Megapixels,

          to an SLR to use some nice lens I have from an old EOS system,
          I look at a T2i (18 megapixels) body only for $799 which is enough to have me waiting for a while to accumulate more extra cash,

          then see also a Rebel XTi (with 10.1 megapixels) for only $299 (body only) which I could swing much sooner,

          Do you guys see the advance in Megapixels worth it, for a non-pro photographer, not blowing stuff up for printing beyond internet posting etc.

          Is it WAY worth it to go for the higher resolution stuff, or just extra that pros only really need to take advantage of ???

          I am fine with the photos coming out of my little 10mp machine, but can hardly stand the lens I have sitting around not being used.
          Gotta go DSLR soon, but the advancing technology has me a bit frozen.....

          Opinions please ??
          Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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          • #20
            Originally posted by kodiakrain View Post
            So, I'd like some opinions from you guys, tho you are mostly in a league above where I am at,

            I'm curious, what you would advise, if upgrading to a DSLR from my little Canon Powershot 1200is with 10.0 Megapixels,

            to an SLR to use some nice lens I have from an old EOS system,
            I look at a T2i (18 megapixels) body only for $799 which is enough to have me waiting for a while to accumulate more extra cash,

            then see also a Rebel XTi (with 10.1 megapixels) for only $299 (body only) which I could swing much sooner,

            Do you guys see the advance in Megapixels worth it, for a non-pro photographer, not blowing stuff up for printing beyond internet posting etc.

            Is it WAY worth it to go for the higher resolution stuff, or just extra that pros only really need to take advantage of ???

            I am fine with the photos coming out of my little 10mp machine, but can hardly stand the lens I have sitting around not being used.
            Gotta go DSLR soon, but the advancing technology has me a bit frozen.....

            Opinions please ??
            Any of the two cameras above, plus a good lens or two (the best you can afford). Also, don't limit yourself to EF-S lenses for cropped sensors, since you can use EF lenses on both cropped sensors and FF sensors. The T2i has the advantage of video, and although this is not needed by a lot of people, it can be quite handy at a family wedding, or just if you have kids, pets, and so forth. With the added pixels, you have to consider buying larger external hard drives. However a 2TB WD hard drive at Sam's Club costs around $150.00 (less than that sometimes).

            That said, there is a fellow in this forum who has and continue taking amazing photos with a relatively old Canon 30D. Just think about this: Canon 10D, then 20D, then 30D, 40D, 50D, and now 60D Look at the webpages of Tull777, found right here in this forum. Just look at his photos.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by kodiakrain View Post
              So, I'd like some opinions from you guys, tho you are mostly in a league above where I am at,

              I'm curious, what you would advise, if upgrading to a DSLR from my little Canon Powershot 1200is with 10.0 Megapixels,

              to an SLR to use some nice lens I have from an old EOS system,
              I look at a T2i (18 megapixels) body only for $799 which is enough to have me waiting for a while to accumulate more extra cash,

              then see also a Rebel XTi (with 10.1 megapixels) for only $299 (body only) which I could swing much sooner,

              Do you guys see the advance in Megapixels worth it, for a non-pro photographer, not blowing stuff up for printing beyond internet posting etc.

              Is it WAY worth it to go for the higher resolution stuff, or just extra that pros only really need to take advantage of ???

              I am fine with the photos coming out of my little 10mp machine, but can hardly stand the lens I have sitting around not being used.
              Gotta go DSLR soon, but the advancing technology has me a bit frozen.....

              Opinions please ??
              My opinion is to bascially ignore the megapixel ratings as a reason to purchase another camera, especially if you are just posting photos on the web. Pretty much even the smallest cameras now have enough megapixels to give you what you want.

              Any reasonably good quality body and lens with a 10 megapixel rating will give you up to a nice 20x30 print. And once it is framed and under glass and viewed from 3 feet away I doubt anyone in the world could tell you:
              a. If it was shot with a Nikon or Canon
              b. If it was shot with a 10, 20, or 30 megapixel rated body.

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              • #22
                Here is one of two Tull777's webpage:
                http://www.pbase.com/tull777

                Comment


                • #23
                  The number of pixels make little difference in the image quality for most of us. Once you get past 8 or 10 MP, it isn't much help. I have an old 3 MP camera that continues to make very acceptable 8X10" prints. To some extent more pixels do allow for some additional cropping, but you are still limited my the quality of your lens. To make good use of 15-18mm takes some mighty fine glass.

                  Newer camera bodies do have some nicer features though. Some have better viewfinders, larger LCDs on the back, faster autofocus, less low light noise, and now excellent video capabilities.

                  KodiakRain, I don't know what lenses you have, but the camera bodies you are talking about have digital sensors that are smaller than 35mm film, so all your lenses will have a field of view that is narrower than they were on your old EOS camera. In this way a 50mm lens acts like an 80mm lens. This is great if you have a 300mm tele lens as it's going to work like a 480mm super-tele lens. But the bad side is a 28mm wide angle is going to act like a normal length 45mm lens, and you will no longer have a wide lens. So unless you have some old superwide lenses in your bag, you will probably still want one of the "new normal" zoom lenses that start out around 17-18mm.

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                  • #24
                    Im not worried about mega pixels. I usually never go over 10 anyway. I really just want to get the best camera for my budget and not have to buy another for along time. Im really leaning toward a D90 and spending the extra money on better glass. I have checked out the Canon line because of all the input on here though. Im the type that will research it to death before I buy so please keep the inputs coming. Thanks

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                    • #25
                      I'm shooting a couple of Canon 7Ds, but it's more about the quaility of your lenses than the camera. Buy good glass!

                      Jim

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Jim Strutz View Post

                        KodiakRain, I don't know what lenses you have, but the camera bodies you are talking about have digital sensors that are smaller than 35mm film, so all your lenses will have a field of view that is narrower than they were on your old EOS camera. In this way a 50mm lens acts like an 80mm lens. This is great if you have a 300mm tele lens as it's going to work like a 480mm super-tele lens. But the bad side is a 28mm wide angle is going to act like a normal length 45mm lens, and you will no longer have a wide lens. So unless you have some old superwide lenses in your bag, you will probably still want one of the "new normal" zoom lenses that start out around 17-18mm.
                        That's good info, thanks Jim,
                        So, not having had them out for a long while, I believe the lens I have, for an EOS SLR system,
                        are a 28-70 zoom, as well as an 80-210,

                        So are these still considered "Good Glass" will be fine with the DSLR's right?

                        and considering what Jim is mentioning on the sensors, I should go ahead
                        and instead of look for a "Body Only" deal, try to find one with a good wide angle to complete a good setup right?

                        Thanks for all the responses on the Megapixel factor
                        Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by RCBOWHUNTER View Post
                          Anybody shooting the Canon T2i? I am thinking about getting that camera as I break into the dslr world. I have a buddy who shoots a lot of video with it and loves it. Any thoughts/opinions?
                          I just got the T2i a while ago and it is great. Took a couple of short videos just to see how it did and I was really impressed. Now I just need to get my knowledge up to par with what this camera can do.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by barrowdave View Post
                            I just got the T2i a while ago and it is great. Took a couple of short videos just to see how it did and I was really impressed. Now I just need to get my knowledge up to par with what this camera can do.
                            Buy a book written by David D. Bush that's specifically written for the T2i. It will save you a lot of time learning how to use your camera.

                            This one at Amazon (should also be found locally):
                            http://www.amazon.com/David-Buschs-C.../dp/1435457668

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                            • #29
                              Thanks Ray, appreciate the help! Just got Understanding Exposure and that is shedding some light on the ISO-Av-Tv triangle for me. Busch's book will be next.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by barrowdave View Post
                                Thanks Ray, appreciate the help! Just got Understanding Exposure and that is shedding some light on the ISO-Av-Tv triangle for me. Busch's book will be next.
                                Glad to help. Bush's book will teach you how to use your camera. It's like having the camera's manual in front of you, but with explanations of what happens when you change the settings, how to change them, and so forth. The manual is more like a condensed version that's hard to understand and puts you to sleep.

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