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Scope cross hair larger when zoomed

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  • Scope cross hair larger when zoomed

    I was comparing my new Docter Optics 2.5 to 10 power scope to several other high quality scopes. I noticed that when the magnification was increased on the Docter the cross hairs got larger (mainly in the heavy duplex area away from the center). None of the other scopes did it. A friend says that it is a sign of a cheap scope. Anyone know anything about why this happens?

  • #2
    Most European scopes are designed that way. I've never used one as they're out of my price range. So much for being a CHEAP scope!

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    • #3
      normal operation

      Your friend is wrong! It is a sign of a good scope for low-light conditions. The Europeans (esp Germans) like scopes that work well in low light more than ones that work better for extremely long shots.

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      • #4
        YEP! That's the main reason I went with the Hvy Plex in my VX III 1.75-6x32.

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        • #5
          Magnified Reticle

          The reticle in your new scope is in the first optical plane, which causes the reticle to grow proportionately with the image. This design makes the reticle larger so it will be more visible in dim light. The reticle design that has the reticle in the second plane does not grow with greater image magnification. This design makes high precision target/reticle visibility possible at higher magnifications (the reticle covers less and less of the target as the magnification is turned up).

          The two designs have no bearing on the quality of the scope whatsoever. They are simply different--first plane design is more useful in pure hunting conditions, with less target shooting application. Virtually all competition target scopes have the reticles in the second plane, because this design allows the shooter to see more of the target relative to the part covered (subtended) by the reticle.

          Your scope is a very high quality hunting scope, and I am sure you will enjoy using it.

          Best Regards,
          Jim

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          • #6
            One other characteristic of the magnified reticle

            One more characteristic of the reticle in the first plane is that the distance between the heavy part of the crosshair and the intersection of the crosshairs always remains the same, relative to the target. So, if the shooter is using that distance as a holdover reference (or as a range estimating reference), it doesn't matter what magnification power the scope is set at. For example, if the distance from the heavy part of a duplex reticle to the intersection of the crosshairs is 18" at 100 yards, it will still be 18" at 500 yards, regardless of power setting.

            Hope that hasn't muddied the water for you. It is well worth doing some studying on optics for shooting, in general.

            Jim

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rifleshooter View Post
              I was comparing my new Docter Optics 2.5 to 10 power scope to several other high quality scopes. I noticed that when the magnification was increased on the Docter the cross hairs got larger (mainly in the heavy duplex area away from the center). None of the other scopes did it. A friend says that it is a sign of a cheap scope. Anyone know anything about why this happens?
              your doctor isn't a "cheap scope", and the optics compare favorably with other quality european models. scope reticles made for the european market do increase in size because they are designed that way.

              american scopes on the other hand, have a constant size reticle. it is just a matter of choice.

              if this is a distraction, you will have to trade (or return) your scope as it can't be changed.

              happy trails.
              jh
              happy trails.
              jh

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              • #8
                Originally posted by midnightsunfun View Post
                For example, if the distance from the heavy part of a duplex reticle to the intersection of the crosshairs is 18" at 100 yards, it will still be 18" at 500 yards, regardless of power setting.
                Jim, you might want to edit this. You have the right idea, but the wording may be wrong ?

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                • #9
                  OOPS! Correction to my earlier post.

                  Originally posted by midnightsunfun View Post
                  One more characteristic of the reticle in the first plane is that the distance between the heavy part of the crosshair and the intersection of the crosshairs always remains the same, relative to the target. So, if the shooter is using that distance as a holdover reference (or as a range estimating reference), it doesn't matter what magnification power the scope is set at. For example, if the distance from the heavy part of a duplex reticle to the intersection of the crosshairs is 18" at 100 yards, it will still be 18" at 500 yards, regardless of power setting.

                  Hope that hasn't muddied the water for you. It is well worth doing some studying on optics for shooting, in general.

                  Jim
                  The example above did muddy the water, and I apologize.

                  I should have said: For example, if the distance from the heavy part of a duplex reticle to the intersection of the crosshairs is 18" at 100 yards with the scope power at 2X, it will still be 18" at 100 yards with the scope power set at 6X.

                  I am sorry if I caused any confusion. Thanks Bill for catching that and letting me know!

                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    As others have said, its a sign of a high quality European scope. I have several Kahles and Zeiss and they all do that. The Germans hunt wild boar at night and that reticle sure helps. They also don't have the shooting hour restrictions the lower 48 has. Your friend is incorrect but if he convinces you it is a cheap scope, I'll be glad to take it off your hands for a few bucks

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