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Woodhauling flatsled

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  • Woodhauling flatsled

    Here are a couple of pics of the woodhauling flatsled that I made. The sled is 10 ft. long, 36" wide, 9.5" high. Runners were made out of 2"x6"s, for the front curve of the runner I usually make a 4 piece design so when I lay the 1/2" plywood on top and press it down it curves naturally without cracking up the plywood, while I am securing it in place. All the pieces are glued before I screw them together, makes for a stronger bond. The cross pieces 2"x6"x 36" and are there for support, makes the sled stronger for the days when you are hauling a heavy load of logs. They are spaced approx" 20" apart on center. On top of the crosspieces I bolted down a 2"x4" on each side, make sure you predrill the holes before putting in your lag bolts and use flat washers for each bolt. The slots you see in the pic are for running your rope through. Then on each side of the runners I covered the 2"x6" lumber runners with plywood to cut back on wear and tear of the runners on the trail, this is done on both side of the runners. Also makes the runners stronger so that a heavy load doesnt cause them to cave in when you are driving on a rough trail. When I built this sled I used Grip Rite Fastners Primeguard Plus Exterior Screws both 1-5/8" and 3" much stronger than nails. Last thing I need to do is put a couple coats of weatherproof paint on it to seal it up. Overall it is a good basic design out here, a lot of woodhaulers use the same design of sled. Over the years sled construction has been evolving, some woodhaulers now use homemade metal sleds, sleds that are made out of 2"-3" square metal stock. These sleds are very sturdy, maybe I will ask my friend if I can take a few pics of his sled to show on here.
    Last edited by Nukalpiaq; 08-01-2009, 23:45.

  • #2
    Sure looks like it will be limited only by what is pulling it! Now if you happen to own 2 oxen you will be able to haul a years worth of wood in about 3 loads! Great sled! Happy hauling!!

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    • #3
      Skookum sled

      Looks big enough to haul a broken down machine home on as well. We used to use sleds like this to haul drums of oil and gas as well as wood. Also ones with plywood sides to haul stuff for camping, hunting, or a supply run to town.

      Like your simple but tough looking hitch.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MagLvr View Post
        Sure looks like it will be limited only by what is pulling it! Now if you happen to own 2 oxen you will be able to haul a years worth of wood in about 3 loads! Great sled! Happy hauling!!
        Oxen out here in the bush would be great, only problems is when the meat prices go up at the local store they would probably end up in my freezer as winter meat. So I guess I better stick to my snowmachine. And sayak we do use these flatsleds for hauling broken down snowmachines, fuel drums, skiffs during the spring time when we are heading out to the ice edge to go out in the bay to seal hunt. Usually load the skiff stern forward and tie it down good. These flat sled can be considered general purpose sleds. We also have another design that we use which has sides and front and back. Locals call them santa claus sleds, interesting thing about sled design most villages have their own special design for their type of terrain. The design I just mentioned is a design that my family has been building for 3 generations now. Interesting how that goes. Our family's design has been modified over the years to improve towability and use on extended winter camping trips. Then we have smaller sleds similar in design for day to day use. Couple sheets of 4'x8' 1/2inch plywood can make a good mid size sled for everyday use. Hunting sleds are usually 10ft long 34" to 36" wide with sides of 24". Sometimes a box is built in to the back of the sled with a hinged lid for storing gear. I prefer to keep mine open so I can lash two 15gallon fuel containers side by side for my camping trips. I think it would be an interesting study researching sled design and their uses out here in the bush, due to the fact that every area is different.

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        • #5
          What material are the runners?

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          • #6
            UHMW Plastic

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
              Oxen out here in the bush would be great, only problems is when the meat prices go up at the local store they would probably end up in my freezer as winter meat.
              I was reading an article on moose which said that moose were the easiest of all the Deer to domesticate, but that their food value made them impractical to train.
              I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

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