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The Hunting gear storage shed project

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  • The Hunting gear storage shed project

    Now that we are back from our 4th of July trip itís time to start a storage shed project that been on the back burner for a while. My son and I are building the shed. Its time to take the garage back which has become the manufacturing area for Innovative Outdoorsman products and we need a better storage area for all the ladder and chain on tree stands and climbing sticks and deer decoys and other hunting gear and yard tools. We designed the shed and gathered all the supplies before the holiday. Its going to be a 12 x 12 shed with a roofed overhang on one side. The shed will have 8 foot walls and a couple windows. It will have double doors, a ramp for the riding mower and a roof vent because sheds can get pretty hot inside. The plan is to work on the shed in the afternoon/evenings after work each day as weather allows. Iíll use this space to detail the project as we make progress. Here is a drawing of the shed we designed and used to generate the bill of materials.


  • #2
    Step one is sight prep. The shed will be tucked along the edge of some trees in the yard so branch trimming needs to be done to make room for the shed. The building permit is issued and diggerís hotline has marked the area. Each weekday after work (weather permitting) I should get about 5 hours to work on the project. More on the weekends.



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    • #3
      I dug away the topsoil and backfilled with crushed paver base and tamped it down and leveled all the pavers. Then the treated 4 x 4ís were laid on the pavers and the floor joists on top of that. The sun went away and the mosquitos came out in full force but itís a good start.





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      • #4
        Hey Energizer Bunny, I mean RC, looking good!
        When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
        '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"
        2018 12' Moto Jet "River Pup"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Music Man View Post
          Hey Energizer Bunny,
          Isn't he though...??? Can't wait to see what he's got for us this time...!!!
          Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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          • #6
            The next step is nailing in all the floor joist braces which provide support/spacing and nailing for the floor decking. The floor is ĺ plywood with tongue and groove edging to lock it all together. The big flat deck is the perfect place to build the trusses needed for the roof. There was still daylight so I built a jig for the 7 trusses and had time to build the first truss. 6 more to go but thatís for another day as Iím out of light.





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            • #7
              All 7 trusses are finished and will be set aside waiting for the walls to go up.



              Then it was time to build and raise the walls



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              • #8
                Looking good

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                • #9
                  Because the roofed overhang on the west side will make it challenging to raise the fiber/cement siding, we installed those 3 sheets before raising the trusses. The Fiber Cement siding sheets are heavy (80 Lbs each).





                  Then we were good to go raising the 7 trusses. That used up the rest of the daylight. We still need to brace all the trusses but that is for another day.





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                  • #10
                    All the trusses are braced and reinforced.





                    In order to work safe while installing the roof decking and later shingling, we built a temporary scaffolding. (Ladders suck) Then it was time to trim the truss tails and install sub facia. Having scaffolding helps in doing a straight and square job that shows up when viewed from the ground.





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                    • #11
                      Biggest surprise to me was how cheap scaffolding rental is. Cannot contemplate a project or repair without it now. You're right, ladders suck.

                      Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        Scrap (reclaimed) lumber from a barn tear down is even cheaper and the screws holding it together are reusable.

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                        • #13
                          That be true. I did not intend to impugn your fine scaffold, and I appreciate your knack for making functional things out of scraps.

                          Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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                          • #14
                            Time to raise most (but not all) of the roof sheeting (1/2Ē OSB) 4 Full sheets and 4 half sheets were nailed in place. The two sheets at the bottom of the overhung ďlean toĒ portion of the roof were not installed so that the 3 support posts and header could be installed. (They needed to be raised above the roof line in order to be dropped down into the holes that were dug)



                            The last sheets of roofing we not installed with the rest so there would be room to raise the 3 treated 4 x 4ís and their header to support the roofed overhang. Holes were dug (Through mostly rocky ground with some clay soil around them. This dirt really sucks for digging) Since there is not enough suitable soil to put back in the hole the support post holes are backfilled with paver base and tamped and settled with water. Then all three posts all were trimmed to the same height and the 4 x 4 header beam raised and installed. All the truss tails were then nailed to the header beam and trimmed and the sub facia installed. Then the last sheets of roof decking installed.





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                            • #15
                              I've had a long-standing bias against OSB, based on nothing really but assumptions about quality and durability. Of late, I've seen comments here and on the CountryPlans forum from some folks who believe OSB is generally now superior to plywood in terms of durability and water resistance. Was that a factor in your decision here?

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