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  • Fatal Bear attacks

    With the death of the eleven year old Sam Ives in Utah this last week, I ran across this list of fatal bear attacks:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...rica_by_decade

    I guess when you look at this from a statistical perspective, bear attacks are so rare to the population that they really become insignificant. However it is hard to tell that to the families of missing people lost to bear attacks.

    In my life I have seen many bears and had the opportunity to harvest a few.
    It is strange to me to read about people who have never seen a bear in the wild. I loose sight of the fact that the general public have no idea that they are treading the same trails that bears have been using for millions of years. It amazes me that we are not seeing more human fatalities from our encounters with wildlife.

    While out hunting and camping this year I would encourage everyone to be prepared for the worst but enjoy every opportunity we can to spend time with our kids in the great outdoors.

    Happy Hunting.....Bigmnt

  • #2
    I think it's interesting that in the 2000's, only 3 incidents were in Alaska. I would expect that number to be MUCH higher. 5/13 in the 90's.... I'm sure the list isn't large enough to be anything more than a sample but I'd guess it's fairly representative.

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    • #3
      Too bad the list dosen't include just attacks...with bears killed and or with injuries listed.....think that the numbers would be 10x the fatality number.

      jedi

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      • #4
        bear encounters

        Very interesting info about bear incounters/attacks.

        http://www.absc.usgs.gov/research/br...erbay/glba.htm
        "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

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        • #5
          Thanks Bear Buster

          Very informative site.

          Bigmnt

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          • #6
            2nd that.
            Thanks for posting it.
            We had 2 grizzlies killed down the street from us on Thursday.
            (Freeman Rd and Nordale Rd) which is just on the otherside of the pipeline from us.

            Almost too close for comfort.
            Lurker.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nwsak View Post
              I think it's interesting that in the 2000's, only 3 incidents were in Alaska. I would expect that number to be MUCH higher. 5/13 in the 90's.... I'm sure the list isn't large enough to be anything more than a sample but I'd guess it's fairly representative.
              Key words on the site:

              This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
              The other day a friend showed me a file that his brother-in-law had researched at the UAF library. It was a collection of bear attack stories in Alaska pre-1920. Apparently the territorial governor wanted to implement some predator control and east coast liberals inundated Congress with a letter campaign, so Alaskans responded with reports on bear attacks. (With politics, there is nothing new under the sun). It was absolutely amazing to read some of these accounts (lots of poor handwriting).

              I've exchanged emails over the years with Larry Kaniut, author of "Alaska Bear Tales" book series, and emailed him notifying him of the information. He was interested, so my friend's brother-in-law is going to contact him.

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              • #8
                info from report

                If you read somewhere close to the bottom.......pepper spray only worked 5 out of 8 times.

                I bet the 500 S&W would be 8 for 8
                "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

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                • #9
                  Another site

                  Here is another website to add to the fray..

                  http://tafkac.org/animals/bear_attacks.html

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                  • #10
                    The Wikipedia article is fascinating reading. Noticeably absent from the list however is the much publicized, savage attack which occurred at Laird Hot Springs B.C. in August 1997. That incident resulted in two deaths and two injuries.

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                    • #11
                      Bear Attacks in AK

                      In Larry Kaniuts' Book "More Alaska Bear Stories", He lists approximately 40 more fatal bear attacks that have occured in Alaska in the last 100 years. You do not have to fear the bears - Just give them the respect they deserve! If bears were out to eat or attack us there would be exponentially more fatalities than what there are. If people would educate themselves before entering the "bears backyard" and use a little common sense there would be fewer fatalities.

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                      • #12
                        New Bear Safety Website

                        For great sources of advice on bear safety, check out
                        www.bear-viewing-in-alaska.info

                        This site directs you to all sorts of cutting-edge safety information, whether your preferred method of coping with bears is avoidance, deterrence, diplomacy, or destruction. There is detailed information on how to:

                        * "negotiate" with a bear that isn't aggressive, in order to minimize risk that it will become aggressive.

                        * "negotiate" with a bear that is aggressive to cool it down (most serious maulings are defensive, so trying to scare bear away is often the worst thing you can do.)

                        * use pepper spray, flares or other tools to deter bears.

                        * use a rifle or shotgun to cripple and kill a bear. One of the safety manuals listed shows the location of each major organ and limb bone from front and side views, and how these positions change as a bear is charging.

                        In the hands of an expert, a gun can be extremely effective -- although there may not be time to use it in the event of a charge from close range, given that bears can run at roughly 35mph (15 ft/sec). By contrast, in the hands of someone who is not an expert at shooting under extreme stress, and who does not know where to place shots to hit the brain, spine or heart, guns are much less effective than pepper spray.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LaughingBear View Post
                          For great sources of advice on bear safety, check out
                          www.bear-viewing-in-alaska.info

                          This site directs you to all sorts of cutting-edge safety information, whether your preferred method of coping with bears is avoidance, deterrence, diplomacy, or destruction. There is detailed information on how to:

                          * "negotiate" with a bear that isn't aggressive, in order to minimize risk that it will become aggressive.

                          * "negotiate" with a bear that is aggressive to cool it down (most serious maulings are defensive, so trying to scare bear away is often the worst thing you can do.)

                          * use pepper spray, flares or other tools to deter bears.

                          * use a rifle or shotgun to cripple and kill a bear. One of the safety manuals listed shows the location of each major organ and limb bone from front and side views, and how these positions change as a bear is charging.

                          In the hands of an expert, a gun can be extremely effective -- although there may not be time to use it in the event of a charge from close range, given that bears can run at roughly 35mph (15 ft/sec). By contrast, in the hands of someone who is not an expert at shooting under extreme stress, and who does not know where to place shots to hit the brain, spine or heart, guns are much less effective than pepper spray.
                          That's an opinion and not FACT!
                          "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bear Buster View Post
                            Originally Posted by LaughingBear
                            ......In the hands of an expert, a gun can be extremely effective -- although there may not be time to use it in the event of a charge from close range, given that bears can run at roughly 35mph (15 ft/sec). By contrast, in the hands of someone who is not an expert at shooting under extreme stress, and who does not know where to place shots to hit the brain, spine or heart, guns are much less effective than pepper spray.
                            That's an opinion and not FACT!
                            Let's give "science" plenty of chance to "prove" itself.

                            And "effective" is a much more broad word than "is", if you know what I mean...........

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mark View Post
                              Let's give "science" plenty of chance to "prove" itself.

                              And "effective" is a much more broad word than "is", if you know what I mean...........

                              Yeah......25% could be considered effective not EFFECTIVE enough for me......I'll go with S&W 500..... 100% effective on BEAR attacks to date
                              "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

                              Comment

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