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ALASKA Wilderness Survival "Wild" Edible Plants....???

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  • ALASKA Wilderness Survival "Wild" Edible Plants....???

    Are there tutor's available to teach wild edibles...??? Not a class thing, not a group field trip thing. A one on one day hikes and wild edibles lessons. Especially deep winter wild edible plants. (Yes, I got books).
    "Essential......to Prepping for Survival, is to be able to segregate, what you think will happen, from what you hope will happen, from what you fear will happen, from what is happening".

  • #2
    I am trying to set something up for the group, I have a member that knows a lady that teaches such a thing.
    All I know is dead of winter I am not gonna be picky one of the first things I'd be looking for is a raven or owl, something with some fat on their bones
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
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    • #3
      Originally posted by ironartist View Post
      I am trying to set something up for the group, I have a member that knows a lady that teaches such a thing.
      All I know is dead of winter I am not gonna be picky one of the first things I'd be looking for is a raven or owl, something with some fat on their bones
      We have a heavy crop of Sea Oats still standing and dry from last year all along the beach of Turnagain Arm. The New (2011) Sea Oats are about 22" high as of yesterday. I would have not thought to forage for Sea Oats in the dead of winter, till I made this recent discovery. I also think many of the roots of plants adjacent to springs flowing in winter may be edible, and hand dig able in winter.
      "Essential......to Prepping for Survival, is to be able to segregate, what you think will happen, from what you hope will happen, from what you fear will happen, from what is happening".

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      • #4
        There's always spruce tips. Granted you'll smell like an air freshener for a few days but they're edible.

        Labrador Tea is usually plentiful in the spruce bogs. Not much in the way of nourishment besides some vitamins but it's pleasant to drink and that's usually good for morale.

        The cambium layer of all willows, aspens, cottonwoods and birches (in AK) is edible but bitter. Of course, with the willows that bitter taste is salicylic acid--the base compound for aspirin--so while you might starve, at least your headaches will be minimal.

        If you have the means to chop through ice cattail roots can be had in the winter if they're in your area. Bake/roast them like potatoes. Tastless mush but a good source of starchy carbs.
        If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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