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"Kelp" whats to know about eating Kelp.....?

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  • "Kelp" whats to know about eating Kelp.....?

    Kelp.....does it need to be cooked....? is it goooder cooked, goooder raw.....? I am asking from a reference of survival food. And is there many different kinds of kelp in Alaska??
    "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

  • #2
    It's been a while but I used to eat bladderwrack and kelp when I was out on my kayaking expeditions. No cooking required. Takes some getting used to. There's also "beach greens" which aren't from the sea but commonly grow on beaches and have a nice mild flavor and are good for salads.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    • #3
      This guy blanches it lightly. http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cruisi...lp-leaves.html

      I Googled "eating kelp." Seems it has all kinds of health benefits attached to it. Who knew?

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      • #4
        The best relish I've ever had was made from kelp. The pickled spawn on kelp herring roe was also good.

        I'd highly recommend pickling kelp but don't know the recipe my friends used but quickly gooled this one.

        http://www.food.com/recipe/Pickled-Bull-Kelp-334435

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
          Kelp.....does it need to be cooked....? is it goooder cooked, goooder raw.....? I am asking from a reference of survival food. And is there many different kinds of kelp in Alaska??

          I am asking from a reference of survival food.??
          So, the conclusion is look for pickled kelp, or kelp relish growing on the rocks on the south shore of Turnagain Arm.......???
          "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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          • #6
            You might have a look at "Common Edible Seaweeds in the Gulf of Alaska" by Dolly Garza. We've got it in the bookstore and it goes in to the various species, collection methods, preparation methods, traditional uses and nutritional value. As far as I know it's the only book out there for our area.

            -Mike
            Michael Strahan
            Site Owner
            Alaska Hunt Consultant
            1 (907) 229-4501

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            • #7
              Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
              I am asking from a reference of survival food.??
              So, the conclusion is look for pickled kelp, or kelp relish growing on the rocks on the south shore of Turnagain Arm.......???
              Coincidentally, your nemesis posted a similar question on a different forum.
              http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f........&p=299621

              Just assumed you had some and knew where/how to find it, but I usually find them at Costco just down the bank from the fiddlehead fern section.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                You might have a look at "Common Edible Seaweeds in the Gulf of Alaska" by Dolly Garza. We've got it in the bookstore and it goes in to the various species, collection methods, preparation methods, traditional uses and nutritional value. As far as I know it's the only book out there for our area.

                -Mike
                Thank You, I do NOT own that book, but I will order it from the forum bookstore. Rep point sent.
                "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                  You might have a look at "Common Edible Seaweeds in the Gulf of Alaska" by Dolly Garza. We've got it in the bookstore and it goes in to the various species, collection methods, preparation methods, traditional uses and nutritional value. As far as I know it's the only book out there for our area.

                  -Mike
                  Wow, Why is the shipping 60% of the cost of the book......? Can't it be sent book rate........???
                  "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
                    Wow, Why is the shipping 60% of the cost of the book......? Can't it be sent book rate........???
                    Our store software automatically calculates postage, and sometimes it doesn't do it well. That said, everything goes out priority mail or express mail. In this case the postage should come in around $4.50 to $5.00.

                    We don't ship media rate, because over the years our customers have preferred to receive their stuff quickly rather than via the slow boat. Media rate can take six weeks or longer.

                    Regards,

                    -Mike
                    Michael Strahan
                    Site Owner
                    Alaska Hunt Consultant
                    1 (907) 229-4501

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wet eNuf View Post
                      Coincidentally, your nemesis posted a similar question on a different forum.
                      http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f........&p=299621

                      Just assumed you had some and knew where/how to find it, but I usually find them at Costco just down the bank from the fiddlehead fern section.

                      I had largely assumed that there was little eatable plant life to be found in the dead of winter. But with the discovery of Sea Oats & Kelp I am wondering what else one could eat for survival (Plant life) in the dead of winter.
                      "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
                        I had largely assumed that there was little eatable plant life to be found in the dead of winter. But with the discovery of Sea Oats & Kelp I am wondering what else one could eat for survival (Plant life) in the dead of winter.
                        With respect to kelp and ocean plant life, found this website:
                        http://www.northernbushcraft.com/seaweed/index.htm

                        Also has links for bull kelp, giant kelp, alaria, eel grass, purple layer, and sea lettuce.

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                        • #13
                          AGL,
                          I have a small almost pamphlet like book from Dolly Garza titled "Surviving on the Foods of Alaska's Southern Shores" which also goes into some of the coastal animals like Blennys, Limpets and urchins. I have found this book invaluable in expanding our table greens and nutrient intake over the winter.

                          Mountaintrekker

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