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  • #16
    I also like Stihl. I believe mine is an FS290 with a 20" bar.
    I would also recommend you get a file kit with a file guide. This ensures you set the right angle when you are sharpening. Also use the flat file occasionally on the rakers and it will cut much faster. The rakers determine the depth of the cut and they make a guage for that as well to make them Approx the same height as the teeth. I prefer a couple of extra swipes of the flat file so it cuts a bit faster but you have to keep it sharp as well for this to work.
    Also don't forget a saw helmet with screen visor and hearing protection and a set of saw chaps. Hate to see you get hurt.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    • #17
      I've used both "good saws" and "throw away" saws. Back in the day I liked McCulloch, but they are a throw away now, Echo being another throw away, (plus the Echo will hardly run in the winter).

      Sthil and Husqvarna are keepers. Along with everything else, I use mine in the winter to clear trail. I chose Sthil and got one with cold weather options so it will run at -20 and in the snow.

      So it depends on what you need. If you run a chain saw a couple of times in the summer or want one to throw in your boat to cut camp wood once or twice a year, buy a $150.00 throw away. And just toss it when it starts acting up. If you use it a lot and need something dependable buy a $700 keeper with the options you need and take care of it.

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      • #18
        I picked up a Husky 61, 5 years ago at a garage sale for $35. it started on the second pull. besides be louder than heck, it's been a sweet machine. Got a 22" bar on it and can't complain. Keeps me in firewood for the house no problem. That said, I ran Stihl saws for work for a few years. Every thing from a 032 to and 090. Stihl is a great saw.
        I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
          I also like Stihl. I believe mine is an FS290 with a 20" bar.
          I would also recommend you get a file kit with a file guide. This ensures you set the right angle when you are sharpening. Also use the flat file occasionally on the rakers and it will cut much faster. The rakers determine the depth of the cut and they make a guage for that as well to make them Approx the same height as the teeth. I prefer a couple of extra swipes of the flat file so it cuts a bit faster but you have to keep it sharp as well for this to work.
          Also don't forget a saw helmet with screen visor and hearing protection and a set of saw chaps. Hate to see you get hurt.
          i think this is great advice and Very Key to the whole scene, keeping it sharp, learn to do it yourself, with the right tools, and you'll find the saw that cuts like butter, it's all in the chain maintenance.
          Beside ease of cutting, having Finely Sharpened chains as a top priority, vs. just muscleing thru when it gets dull, will be really nice on your saw, it'll run a lot longer if not asked to smoke it's way thru stuff.
          Keep it Sharp, and have spare chains around that are sharp as razors also when out in the field.

          As to the saw you choose, I'd say try to get a feel for them in the shop, if there's a shop that'll actually let you run them a bit, or if you have a friend with a saw you can fire up and feel it running/cutting that'd help immensely.

          I got the chance to run saws building log homes commercially when I was young, and there really is "a feel" to the saw you'll want.

          for example, Stihl's are really great saws, have a high reputation among the pros, and some just swear by them. I like the machinery of a Stihl but when comparing, over hours of felling and carving logs with both Stihls and Husqvarnas, the Stihl just feels a little clunky and awkward in comparison to the Husky. (just my personal preferrence there)

          So after running several types of both saws for many hours of hard work in the woods, I chose Husqvarna and have now run several Husky's, for lots of years in the woods, never worn one out, etc. they are really well built, beautiful pieces of machinery

          All that to say, you'll like how a saw feels in your hands after just a little while of running it (maybe even in the store, the weight of it and balance, etc.) and that oughta be your choice, get one that'll be a joy to run for hours, cause work in the woods'll tax your whole body in enough ways that your saw should not be adding to that with high vibration level or unwieldy weight balance.

          I'd also say, buy high quality, it's one tool that'll pay for itself in quality build many times over.
          Husqvarna, or Stihl, you won't regret either, don't settle for anything less.
          Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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          • #20
            Stihl....keep it sharpened and forget about anything else...roud:
            Proud to be an American!

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