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  • stid2677
    replied
    I use a piece of insulation cut to fit on the bottom of my packraft. Cheap and light.

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  • Ramcam
    replied
    Originally posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    You could certainly fold/inflate the big agnes to fit, but being as I am often in and out of the raft on small gravel bottomed creeks with my shoes on I'd be afraid of possibly popping it by having a rock stuck to the bottom of my shoe while I am getting in my raft.

    I don't row in my packraft so I can't comment on the seat.
    Ah i meant oar kayak style.

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  • Alaska_Lanche
    replied
    Originally posted by Ramcam View Post
    Not to hijack but has anyone used the Cyclone chair with the big agnes to make a rowing seat for their Packraft?And does the Big Agnes fit the bottom of a packraft?It would be nice to incorporate the sleeping pad into the raft to cut down on packed weight.
    You could certainly fold/inflate the big agnes to fit, but being as I am often in and out of the raft on small gravel bottomed creeks with my shoes on I'd be afraid of possibly popping it by having a rock stuck to the bottom of my shoe while I am getting in my raft.

    I don't row in my packraft so I can't comment on the seat.

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  • Ramcam
    replied
    Not to hijack but has anyone used the Cyclone chair with the big agnes to make a rowing seat for their Packraft?And does the Big Agnes fit the bottom of a packraft?It would be nice to incorporate the sleeping pad into the raft to cut down on packed weight.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alaska_Lanche
    replied
    I have 4 Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pads for 24 oz apiece (rectangular version so I can couple the pads together when my wife goes to create a 40" wide bed for us to cuddle on ) and used them exclusively for 3 years for all my camping even down to -15/-20 on a couple of occasions. I would say you must have the great back in those instances for sure. We have 4 as we had to send 2 in that leaked finally after 2 years to to holes that could not be found even in the tub but they were flat every morning when slept on and we were heading out on a trip pronto so we bought to more. Plus we loan some of our gear out to friends that can't or don't know about what kind of stuff they might need for certain trips so having extras of backpacks, sleeping bags, pads, tents and what not is the norm.

    That said I picked up a Neo Air in short size (9 oz) for me and a regular (14 oz) for my wife this last spring. We used the combo for about 20 days in the field between May thru September. Never got cold on my Neo Air short even when it got to the mid 20s on my sheep hunt and I was in a down bag rated to 25 degrees.

    IME both pads have their place as a stand alone. But for anything colder than 20 degrees I would likely opt'd for the Big Agnes Insulated Air Core setup. For summer/fall for the most part if I have bag rated for the expected temps I would have no issues using the Neo Air. What the 9 oz short and 14 oz regular Neos offer is a 1.5 pound weight savings or the ability for us to take two pads for the weight of one Big Agnes pad so the weight savings is worth it for us. Plus the neos are regular cut as well so they couple together just as well. Usually throw my backpack or the like under my lower legs since I am on a short pad.

    My plan this fall is to take along one short Thermarest z-lite pad to place under our two neo airs that is trimmed mummy style a bit to fit better in the floor of my packraft. This will insulate us a bit from the ground, better protect the air pads from any punctures (though I have never popped an air mat the added benefit is nice) especially where the majority of the weight is under our torso. Plus we will haul the z-lite along during day trips to sit on and give my wife a warm place to lay in case we gotta overnight bivy somewhere. The trimmed z-lite comes to right at 8 oz for a total weight of the 3 pad system of 31 oz or still less than 2 pounds for a comfy, better protected, and warmer air pad/ccf (closed cell foam) combo. We can also move the z-lite to the top of the air pads under our torsos to keep us even warmer if needed. Plus it insulates the floor of my packraft a bit which is never a bad thing either. After testing this setup all spring/summer/fall I'll let ya know how it works out, but this setup seems more versatile and lighter than the just the Big Agnes setups for us but time will tell.

    Here is the z-lite pad stuffed into the bottom of my packraft. Still 20" wide but the ends are cut to a taper to better fit the floor:

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  • mdhunter
    replied
    Originally posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i like to sleep on my side and my neo has enough air i can do that without my hip bones hitting the ground...none of my other pads could do that.
    Jake, did you give up on your Luxurylite Ultralite Cot, or do you only pack it on certain hunts? I love my LL.

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  • Jim Strutz
    replied
    I have a REI 3.5" Camp Bed. Nice, but it felt a little stiff and is too large & heavy. Bought an Exped Synmat 9 Deluxe (25" wide & 3.5" thick) It had a small hole that started needing a topping up sometime before morning. After about 10 days it required a refill every hour, but by then I was a week into a 30 day float. I quickly became frustrated enough to chase down that hole and fix it. Never could see the hole, but could plainly see the bubbles when I stood on it while in the water. A drop of Aquaseal fixed it easy enough, and now it holds all night without a problem.

    I hate sleeping bags unless I really need one, so I generally use a home made camping quilt setup that works well to about 10 degrees. But the quilt idea doesn't leave anything between me and the Exped, and I start feeling the cold coming up from the bottom when in freezing temps. The cure has been to throw a fleece vest on top of the Exped and sleep on that. I'm sure with any sleeping bag it would work well enough as is.

    It took me a while to like the Exped's built in pump. The problem is that my wrists don't bend well and I can't seal the pump's intake valve with my palm. But after trying a few things I found a method that works well while still sitting in a chair.

    What I have never complained about is the comfort of the thing. It's very nice. I'm a side sleeper only, and find more than a few hours on a 2" Thermarest painful. With the Exped, sleeping in is now thoroughly delightful.

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  • BRWNBR
    replied
    gotta love the rei dividend!
    i try to pack so theres no room for a 12 pack...and i don't drink so i'd share the whole thing if one slipped by my radar!!

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  • needcoffee
    replied
    Went to REI today and ended up getting the Neo Trekker. A little heavier/sturdier than the Neo with the heavier weight fabric but much quieter as well. I tried out the Big Agnes pads and did not like the longitudinal tube setup. The Neo was a little more comfy. Price wasn't important with the 20% off and my "REI dividend" what ever I purchased was going to be "free", yeah right

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  • FamilyMan
    replied
    Originally posted by LuJon View Post
    I have hunted with Alaska_Lanche who has hunted with Jake and after listening to him explain how Jake "tractored" up the mountains I think I would have to slip a few serious rocks into that barneys bag of his just to keep him in sight!
    No no, its alot nicer to toss a 12 pack in there, and after 2 or 3 thousand vertical feet are accomplished, the gentlemanly thing to do is to offer the poor guy a beer - out of his own pack! Make sure you have your camera ready; the look is priceless.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRWNBR
    replied
    lol you guys are funny....
    twinkies...gonna have to weigh those before i consider them for the sheep pack...
    funny story on the rock idea lujon...
    had a client who was pretty cocky, an outfitter from canada and i was about 20 at the time, man he made fun of having to hunt with the rookie, so i stayed about 200 yards ahead of him everywhere we went, just to burn him out. killed a sheep on day one and hiked him right straight out, about 12 miles or so i can't recal. got back to camp and unloaded my gear and ever pocket had a rock the size of my fist in it...we got a good laugh outa that one! (i don't burn clients out anymore...that was a one time deal and will cost extra in the future$$)

    Leave a comment:


  • LuJon
    replied
    Originally posted by fullkurl View Post
    I don't think it would help, LJ.

    Have you seen Jake's website where he is carrying TWO loaded backpacks stacked on one another!? The rig looks about 8 feet tall. The guy is as tough as he is nuts!
    I can only wonder on the weight of that stuff.
    I have hunted with Alaska_Lanche who has hunted with Jake and after listening to him explain how Jake "tractored" up the mountains I think I would have to slip a few serious rocks into that barneys bag of his just to keep him in sight!

    Leave a comment:


  • fullkurl
    replied
    Originally posted by LuJon View Post
    add some more twinkies to the diet and your hip bones won't hit the ground regardless of the pad you use!

    I don't think it would help, LJ.

    Have you seen Jake's website where he is carrying TWO loaded backpacks stacked on one another!? The rig looks about 8 feet tall. The guy is as tough as he is nuts!
    I can only wonder on the weight of that stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Snyd
    replied
    My BA IAC had a problem with the valve after having it for year. It was one of the first ones and the guts of the valve were plastic. The next year they upgraded the valve with brass. BA gave me a new pad with the upgraded valve. Good on 'em.

    I've never had a puncture but have never used it directly on the ground. The material seems pretty darn tough and puncture resistant. The pad also comes with a little puncture repair kit in a little pouch in the bag.

    Leave a comment:


  • LuJon
    replied
    Originally posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i like to sleep on my side and my neo has enough air i can do that without my hip bones hitting the ground...none of my other pads could do that.
    add some more twinkies to the diet and your hip bones won't hit the ground regardless of the pad you use!

    Leave a comment:

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