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  • warmest down sleeping bags

    anybody have a review or own a Bask sleeping bag? in particular the kashgar or karakoram model. they look really nice and have some impressive temp ratings -76 and -47 respectively. a little pricey but was wondering if anybody has used one. just checking out down bags and these looked interesting.

  • #2
    I havn't used it or that brand, but for the money I'd try a Wiggley's or less yet a Cabelas Outfitter. Unless your going Polar Bear Hunting.
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    • #3
      funny you should mention polar bears because they're right around where i live, however i have tried the wiggy's (i just bought my wife one) and just looking for maybe something different.

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      • #4
        I've been out at -20 in a Marmot sleeping bag and was nice and warm, (sleep real good actually). It is rated -40 and its a well known name. If you are really looking for an extreme weather sleeping bag I go with a brand name.

        Just my 2 cents.

        Kelvin

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cjustinm View Post
          funny you should mention polar bears because they're right around where i live, however i have tried the wiggy's (i just bought my wife one) and just looking for maybe something different.
          I have the Cabela's Outfitter -40, I get cold pretty quick and this is a warm bag. But to heavey for packing the mountains.
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          • #6
            im not sure about the brand name...i think it may be a high quality bag its just not made in the us. i saw the kashgar model was around 800 to 900 dollars so im not too worried about some off brand p.o.s. just wondering if anyone had ever used them. I was looking for a high quality bag and these looked pretty dang nice. Multiple baffles to keep cold out and a pretty high down fill rate. I've always owned synthetic for the simple reason down is pretty worthless when wet however after purchasing a canada goose expedition parka ive never been so hot when its so cold outside so i figured down bags would be comparable. thanks for the info so far. i have also heard good things about the cabelas bags that you mentioned good stuff to know. thanks all.

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            • #7
              How much does a top shelf down bag sell for these days.......
              "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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              • #8
                I have been using a down bag for the last few years for all my hunts to include coastal and float hunts. It is about all I use anymore. I store it in 2 layers of waterproof protection and sleep in it with a TI Goat bivy that weighs 6 ounces. On one hunt I get sick and sweated it wet and was still warm, the new down bags seem much more resistant to water than they once were.

                THIS IS MY EXPERIENCE, YOURS MAY BE DIFFERENT!!!!

                Steve
                "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

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                • #9
                  from the info ive been researching top shelf down bags are running more than synthetic a few from the more popular mainstream bags ie north face, marmot ect are running in the 5 to 7 hundred dollar range. im sure there are cheaper and also ive seen some that are more but either way they are a major investment but its better than freezing.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cjustinm View Post
                    anybody have a review or own a Bask sleeping bag? in particular the kashgar or karakoram model. they look really nice and have some impressive temp ratings -76 and -47 respectively. a little pricey but was wondering if anybody has used one. just checking out down bags and these looked interesting.
                    This is a Russian mountaineering outfit. Probably pretty good bags that follow a European Standard so keep in mind that you need to pay closer attention to the ratings. There will be a comfort rating (think comfortable) and an extreme rating (meaning survival).

                    Most any reasonable polar sub-zero designs, using great materials/components, with adequate volume of high quality Down insulation in certified power-fills 800+ to 850 should give you an excellent comfort rating between -20F to -40F and some to -60F.

                    In the best of 100% Down Bags... a good way to look it:
                    $700-$850 gets you to -20F and some to -40F
                    $1000-$1200 gets you into -40F to -60F

                    To my knowledge, nobody is realistically stamping out comfort ranges beyond these extremes, while others will provide an extreme range (that's very speculative at best).

                    Are the Bask Bags good (even great)? Maybe-so... I have no experience on these particular couple of bags. They look to be very good.

                    I'd also tell you that Feathered Friends bags are exceptional in every way for polar sub zero expeditions, and these would no question be my choice. I have two older FF bags still going strong long after top name synthetics have lost significant comfort range.

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                    • #11
                      I have a Raging Inferno (North Face) Bag I would sell for $420.00
                      "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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                      • #12
                        Western Mountaineering is the standard for extreme cold weather down bags. You'll pay but get your monies worth.
                        Marmot's -20/-30 Col is also a great bag. I had a new unused one and sold it to another forum member, he really likes it.

                        The holy grail? Feathered Friends Valandre Thor rated at -58 and $855.

                        Specifications:
                        • Temperature rating: -58 degrees Fahrenheit
                        • Insulation / EN Rating (degrees Fahrenheit): 850-fill goose down / -9.4 (T-limit); -50.8 (T-extreme)
                        • Total weight: 4 lb 12 oz
                        • Fill weight: 3 pounds
                        • Shoulder / hip / foot girth: 60 / 55 / 36.5 inches
                        • Fits to: 5 ft 7 in (Small); 6 feet (Medium); 6 ft 7 in (Large)
                        • Shell material: Polymid ripstop / polyester ripstop
                        Proud to be an American!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by stid2677 View Post
                          I have been using a down bag for the last few years for all my hunts to include coastal and float hunts. It is about all I use anymore.

                          Steve
                          My wife and I have gone the same route, Steve. We're pretty much full-time down bag users now. I'll bring my synthetic if it's summer (my down bag is just too warm) or if I know that I'm going to be in a full-time deluge of rain, but I've never been the least bit disappointed with my decision to bring the down bag along.

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                          • #14
                            I just made the switch back to down this year after a decade or so in synthetics. I purchased Western Mountaineering and so far, couldn't be happier. Warmer and way lighter than my synthetics. I view all temperture ratings with a grain of salt, regardless of maker. Better makers are generally closer to comfort ratings.
                            "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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                            • #15
                              My sheep partner used a Western Mountaineering bag on one of our sheep hunts and he loved it, he did have to return one because it was too small, so you might want to try them on for size.

                              Another thing I have started doing is leave a spare bag at base camp when feasible for the odd emergency or if you have to ferry meat back to camp it is nice not to have to carry your bag back and forth. Picked this tip up from Alaska_Lance, thanks Luke.

                              Steve
                              "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

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