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  • Knife Sharpeners???

    I can’t make my mind up on what type of knife sharpening system to get for home or for the field. I plan to get two separate setups. I have always done well with sharpening, but I now have a few fairly expensive blades and don’t want to screw them up by just “eyeballing it.” What do you use? Any suggestions for home sharpening systems? Any suggestions for small/light field sharpeners?

    Anybody have any experience with Gatco? They have a kit where the blade is clamped in and you work the stone. I like the look of the ability to hone at specific angles. Curious to find out how long the diamond sharpeners last before they need replacing.

    What are your opinions?
    Thanks in advance!
    Joshua

  • #2
    Lansky

    I have had my Lansky for 7 years now. Love it for knifes and broadheads. If you remember to use a little oil, it will be a long time before you wear it out.

    Mine has three stones and I used to have a very fine Gatco for finishing off but it broke. The weakness was the tightening screw on the rod.

    Honeing at a specific angle is not as important as maintaining the same angle. Using an old oil stone you have a tendency to round over more.

    Patriot Life Member NRA
    Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
    Life Member Disabled American Veterans


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    • #3
      EZE Lap

      I use a diamond embedded medium steel made by EZE Lap. This one is about 3" in lenght and has a leather sheath with it. Also, it has a hook sharpening groove down the middle. Great for packing when ounces count. They also make several models with some having a plastic covers that open up like the old "butterfly" knives.

      At home I use a medium Arkansas stone made by Smiths and finish off the blade with a fine Arkansas stone. I have borrowed the Lansky style sharpener before and they work great too.

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      • #4
        Paper wheel

        here is the link: http://users.ameritech.net/knives/paper.htm

        It fits to a standard bench grinder. Very easy and works fantastic! Tough to bring on a sheep hunt,though.
        sigpicSpending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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        • #5
          Diamond or Traditional?

          What's better? I looked at the Lansky and that is what I had my eye on a while back, but couldn't get my hands on one. I really want a setup that allows me to retain the same angle everytime I sharpen. Lansky offers models in both stones. I've never used diamonds. Any preferrences one way or the other?

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          • #6
            This is the diamond sharpener that I use http://www.knivesplus.com/dmt-knife-...t-adeluxe.html. It takes a little practice to get used to it but it holds the blade at the same angle and is adjustable for different angles.

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            • #7
              Lansky

              And I write inside the box what angle I use for wich knife, so I always use the same angle.. over six years now i have been using it-

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              • #8
                Still stuck on the diamond concept...

                I played with the Lansky Sharpening system this weekend and I like the looks. Still not sure if I should get the stone or the diamond. I've never used a diamond stone, what's the advantage? Longer wear?
                Please advise!

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                • #9
                  I agree on the lansky type sharpeners, they are great. I've only used the stones, not the diamonds. I imagine that the diamonds would last longer but if you use a steel when it needs it, a knife doesn't need actual sharpening very often.

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                  • #10
                    Diamonds are forever

                    I have had my Lansky Diamond set since I moved to Alaska in 99. It still works fine and I use it a lot. Fillet knifes, hunting knifes, broadheads, tools..... it just keeps going. Past two weeks the Cub Scouts have been using it to sharpen a den full of knifes as they strip diamond willow bark off of hiking sticks.

                    Patriot Life Member NRA
                    Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
                    Life Member Disabled American Veterans


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                    • #11
                      another option...

                      I used a Lansky for years and it does a good job but last year a friend showed me the ceramic V-sticks and how to properly use them. I picked up a Spyderco setup and I'm sold. It'll sharpen anything including scissors, fishhooks and serrated blades (I haven't tried it on my Cutco D-grinds yet; not sure about that one!) Very easy to use and fast. Portable and light for the field and no oil to spill/clean up. I've been able to put a shaving edge on everything within just a few minutes unless the knife was ruined and I had to use my bench stone first...check it out!

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                      • #12
                        SE Mike, the ceramic sticks you are talking about are working like a steel aren't they? All the ceramic sharpeners I've seen don't remove metal like a stone does they just straighten the edge of the blade.

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                        • #13
                          I have tried almost all of the above mentioned. You know what I use now, the guy that has the machine shop off of phillips field road. I drop off all my knives with him during the summer he usually has them done in a few days. Then I have approx 10 different knives that each serves a purpose on certain hunts and they all shave hair. the few bucks is worth it to me. I bring a cheapo Smith's (the yellow one) with me and have never needed it after starting to have my knives sharpened to a razor by the knife guy. Might sound lazy but saves me the frustration I got with Lansky and others and the knife not shaving hair from the start of the hunt.
                          Last edited by AlaskaCub; 11-14-2006, 11:51.

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                          • #14
                            I use a Chef's Choice 120 knife Sharpener. I have the Lankys and Smith Stones that I no longer use. The Chef's Choice does the best job of sharpening of anything else I have ever used and it only takes a minute or two to sharpen. When You use the Chef's Choice there are no messy oils or mess to contend with. The Chef's Choice holds the knife at the correct angle, uses diamond dust for sharpening and will sharpen the hardest to sharpen stainless steel knives in less than two minutes. It will shave the hair off your arm on the first try and it seems to hold the edge better than any other method of knife sharpening I have used.
                            http://www.chefschoice.com/page2a_m120.html
                            It isn't cheap, but it is one of those tools that once you use it, you wonder how you ever got along without it.

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                            • #15
                              ceramic sticks

                              Bearbait1:
                              I believe that any sharpener takes off metal, including ceramic (I'm sure there's someone out there more knowledgeable than me, so feel free to correct!) The oldest knife I own is a folding Buck that I've had for 35 years and I've really abused it including breaking off the tip. I reground it on my big stone (spins slow with a water bath) and sharpened it a bunch...there's still plenty of steel left for another 35 years. I use refurbished cannery knives on my boat and even with thinner steel and keeping them sharp, I've used them for 15 years. We used to get them for a buck apiece but I've not seen them available for years. Knives aren't terribly expensive and it's well worth getting quality knives....I'm like about everyone else and get at least one or two new knives a year and loose at least that many. I've been picking up Gerbers and Kershaws lately and been leaning towards the folders, but for skinning I like a fixed blade. My caping knife is a custom by Will Stegner...used to be from Big Lake. Anyone know if he's still around? Makes a great knife!

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