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  • Wall Tent Stove

    I have a 12x14 wall tent and looking to get a stove that is big enough to keep warm, but not sure what size... Anyone with experience in stoves wanna share their insight... Looking at 2 different sizes right now 24L x14w OR 28L x 16W. Will I be up in the middle of the night to stoke fire? Is there a brand or style that anyone would recommend? Thanks for your thoughts.

  • #2
    stoves

    I have a 9x7 wall tent with a pretty small stove, not sure on the dimensions but it'll roast me right out of the tent at times with wood. If you burn the fake logs then it'll burn colder but last longer. You'll probably have to put logs in either stove in the middle of the night.
    One other note is if you do burn duralogs or any other brand fake logs you will have to clean the chimney more often.
    I'm sure you know already but put sand or gravel in the bottom first.
    That's about all I remember in dealing with tent stoves.
    William

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Rooster_AK
      I have a 12x14 wall tent and looking to get a stove that is big enough to keep warm, but not sure what size... Anyone with experience in stoves wanna share their insight... Looking at 2 different sizes right now 24L x14w OR 28L x 16W. Will I be up in the middle of the night to stoke fire? Is there a brand or style that anyone would recommend? Thanks for your thoughts.

      Generally yes, you will be up to stoke the fire if you want to keep it going all night. Most people just let it go out and light it again the next morning. Put a bunch of kindling and fire starter next to it so you can hop out of bed...throw it all in, light a match and hop back in bed. Then get up when it's warm, doesn't take long.

      I used to sleep in mine in the winter in the Brooks Range. They work good.

      I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference between those two sizes of stoves. If you have it going hot enought to turn it red hot, it will warm the tent.
      Wasilla Real Estate News
      www.valleymarket.com

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      • #4
        You have to decide what you want in a stove. Lightweight sheepherder type stoves are good for travelling. Heavier stoves are generally tighter, hold a fire longer, but suck for moving around. The usual type wall tent stoves won't hold a fire that long, so like Marty said, have kindling ready. The larger the stove, the more wood you can stuff in it, so the longer it will hold a fire..........assuming you can shut down the air flow thru ther stove. These stoves also aren't made of very thick material, so will warp over time.
        The 12x14 is fairly large. It won't hold heat very long. You may end up getting up during the night to stoke the fire just to keep a little heat in the air.
        I'm sure either of the 2 you listed will keep the tent warm as long as they have some fire burning in them.
        I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
        I have less friends now!!

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        • #5
          You are right on that, Martentrapper.

          He will also have to decide the season he plans to use the tent. For example, i use my 8'x10' canvas tent the first two weeks of September when hunting moose in the interior of Alaska. Sometimes it gets colder than usual, but not much colder that perhaps 20 degrees. I heat my tent from 1 to 3 hours in the evening before I get in my sleeping bag, and sometimes when the weather is too bad for me to hunt moose, such as when raining hard, when the fog is too thick, etc., and I have to stay in the campsite.

          All I have used in the past has been a Coleman propane heater to heat my tent, but now have switched to a Mr. Heater (the one that uses 1 propane bottle). The heater is safer to use indoors, and has an oxygen sensor. One can also use a hose to run the heater from a small propane tank, but I keep the tank outside. This heater produces from 4,000 BTU-8,000. The same company makes another similar heater, but much larger and heavy, and up to 18,000 BTU-HR.

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          • #6
            I own the big buddy heater

            We have an arctic oven that we camp in when we are spearing during the winte and the Mr buddy heater keeps it more than comfortable all night. First trip we tried an actual stove, but the hot and cold variances were just rediculous. One second you would have all of your clothes off and it's 500 degrees (usually during start up) next thing you know it's freezing and you stoke the fire and start it all over again. Very hard to find a happy medium. The duralogs might work better though. And we do have a damper on our stove.
            Mr. buddy is alot lighter and has three settings and a fan which I don't usually use. Also has it's own ignitor. The only thing i don't like about it is it seems fragile. while it has made numerous trips in the sled out to our favorite pike hole with no problems I just dread the time it doesn't work when we get there.
            Justin

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            • #7
              Four Dog Stoves

              If weight isn't a factor, check out the steel stove made by Four Dog:
              http://www.fourdog.com/page2.html

              Really a good stove, and will hold a fire all night. If you want cheap, and fairly light, buy a barrel stove kit and use a 30-gallon barrel, and that will hold a fire all night too if you stoke it right. For cooking, though, and a real quality baffled stove, hard to beat the Four Dog.

              Good Luck,
              Mark
              Mark Richards
              www.residenthuntersofalaska.org

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              • #8
                Thanks all

                Thanks for the info. folks... I appreciate it and will actually see about the 4 dog stove, looks like that will work great for me.
                ...Good Hunting.

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                • #9
                  Stove

                  I have a Cylinder brand stove in my wall tent. The tent is 14x17. I have the outfitter model with the water heater on the side. I normally fill it tight full of wood at night, and stoke it once in the early morning. Good quality and heavy duty.

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                  • #10
                    Military Yukon Stove

                    I have one for sale!
                    Alaska

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                    • #11
                      Canvas Versus Synthetic

                      I have read that canvas is better for breath-ability, but the synthetics are lighter. Does anyone have a preference for one or the other?

                      http://www.squidoo.com/CanvasWallTents

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                      • #12
                        If you're packing you tent on your back, the best options are the Kiufuru or Ti-goat synthetic tipi style tents that are setup for stoves. 4-dogs and Ti-goat both make titanium stoves that weigh but a few pounds, though cost a few $'s.

                        The least expensive option for 1-2 people lightweight setup is a black diamond megamid tent, with a stove jack added from ti-goat, and a small ti stove. About $500 and the whole setup is ~7 pounds.
                        Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                        If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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                        • #13
                          Depending upon your uses, you might consider a portable kerosene heater. I use a 23,000 btu heater in my 12x14 canvas wall tent and like it a lot. I've been comfortable in mid-teen to low 20's temperatures, and in the more typical low-40's temps when I hunt, I can keep the heater turned on medium-low.

                          Advantages: Plenty of warmth, and is a less humid heat than propane; doesn't go out at night; no firewood issues; temperature setting easily adjustable; don't need a stove pipe.

                          Disadvantages: Bulky and heavy; have to bring your fuel with you - can't gather fuel in the field.

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                          • #14
                            Be real careful about carbon monoxide poisoining with the kerosene seater. If the exhaust from the heater isn't ducted out of a flue you have a serious risk of co poisoning.
                            Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                            If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              stove

                              We used the M-1950 with diesel and it was a great little stove, lightweight, compact, and you can burn wood if you don't want to burn diesel, or just don't pack in enough diesel.

                              Also, a few posts behind this one, there is a guy "alaska bush man" that was listed as "Banned", can anyone shed light on this? I was interested in the stove he had for sale.

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