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  • Cost effective rain gear

    i have a buddy coming up to hunt this year and doesn't want to spend 600+$ on rain gear. we will be in the brooks during mid august. i am only familiar with sitka, westcomb, and arcteryx. does anyone have any other recommendations that aren't so dang expensive for him? thanks.

  • #2
    What is he looking to spend for a set

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    • #3
      The Marmot Precip gear is pretty solid. It's not as tough as the stuff you listed, but it is very lightweight and will only run you about $150 for a set. On the heavier end, Helly Hansen Impertech is good and reasonably priced, but it has problems with condensation underneath when working (hiking) while wearing it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sdrhunter View Post
        i have a buddy coming up to hunt this year and doesn't want to spend 600+$ on rain gear. we will be in the brooks during mid august. i am only familiar with sitka, westcomb, and arcteryx. does anyone have any other recommendations that aren't so dang expensive for him? thanks.
        In the Brooks in August, your biggest problem will be sun stroke, 80* temperatures, blinding sunshine, and smoke from forest fires.
        "Essential......to Prepping for Survival, is to be able to segregate, what you think will happen, from what you hope will happen, from what you fear will happen, from what is happening".

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
          In the Brooks in August, your biggest problem will be sun stroke, 80* temperatures, blinding sunshine, and smoke from forest fires.
          AGL4now, LOL!!! last year we nearly got washed away with days of nasty rain. i am not sure what he is willing to spend but he is on a budget and really doesn't want to spend 600-800$ on a rain suit. i don't blame him since this is a one and done deal for him. marmot precip sounds good, any others?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
            In the Brooks in August, your biggest problem will be sun stroke, 80* temperatures, blinding sunshine, and smoke from forest fires.
            And once you get to 6000ft it could be below freezing, having to break ice to pump water and the wind whipping like crazy.... been there done that....

            sdrhunter
            Another option for rain gear the The North Face Venture rain jacket and full zip pants. I've been using if for a few years. One thing about it is that it's white on the inside so can be worn inside out as whites if you want.

            Here's a sale. 69 bucks

            http://www.backcountry.com/the-north...re-jacket-mens
            Last edited by Snyd; 05-12-2011, 17:48.
            A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and don’t have one, you’ll probably never need one again

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            • #7
              Mountain Hardwear Typhoon jacket -$200 It's very light ( 13-15 oz. depending on size) and packable down to fit in a soda can.

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              • #8
                Patagonia Torrent. Looks like great raingear, the jacket is pretty light, I think 11 oz. and $119 for the jacket and I think $89 for the pants. Cloudveil has a model that was I think $140 at Mountain View that looked a little nicer but very similar. I will be purchasing one of the two.

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                • #9
                  Golite is having a 40% off sale and they have decent rain gear. One of there Jackets weigh 7oz, and the pants weigh 7 oz that is light. You could pick up both for about 200, or go with a little heavier stuff for about 150 for the pair.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kahahawai View Post
                    Mountain Hardwear Typhoon jacket -$200 It's very light ( 13-15 oz. depending on size) and packable down to fit in a soda can.
                    thanks for the recommendation. what do you wear for pants?

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                    • #11
                      PU-coatings vs higher end stuff...

                      Polyurethane-coated shells < $100: I agree with others, that effective pieces of raingear can be had for <$100 per piece. I've been using a Precip jacket, which Brian M mentioned - an excellent product esp if you can find at discount. Another brand I'd throw into the mix is Red Ledge. Yesterday, I was looking over their newest Thunderlight jacket and pants at B&J Wholesale, $79 for the jacket. Red Ledge is the raingear Buck Nelson used on his Brooks Range traverse. He published his gear list and review online at: http://www.bucktrack.com/Alaska_Back...st_Review.html. Good PU coated raingear functions very well, is also lightweight, and compressible.

                      Top shelf materials (Gore Tex Paclite, high-end PU-coatings, & newer materials like eVent) cost more: Mr. Nelson's most recent epic trip, the Pacific Coast Trail, upgraded his raingear a bit- to PacLite shells. See his PCT gear list at: http://www.bucktrack.com/PCT_Gear_List.html

                      Between the 2 “hikes”, Buck Nelson switched from one fabric technology to another. Hearing why he opted for the higher cost jacket would be interesting, but your question is about value. Most waterproof/breathable (wp/b) jackets or pants under $100 I think now use polyurethane-coated nylon fabric. The brands mentioned by others are companies whose products seem to have better performing PU-coated fabrics, with the details like seam-sealing done right, and reasonably durable. My preference is to look for top gear at discounts – then buy the best I can find. The trick with discounts though is finding remaining stock in your size.

                      Two good reference sources for more info on raingear, wp/b fabrics in the links below. The “Rain Shell Selection Guidelines” at the end of the Backpackinglight article is a good synopsis:
                      http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/arti...+it+works.html
                      http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...ght/00316.html

                      Good luck.
                      Last edited by 6XLeech; 05-13-2011, 05:13. Reason: Missed edit
                      No habitat, no hunter.

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                      • #12
                        Red Ledge and other rain gear

                        I have used Red Ledge rain gear on three thru-hikes and it has served me well.

                        The reason I switched on the PCT is the Outdoor Research Zealot jacket saved me about 8+ ounces over the current model Thunderlight parka, and I knew I was likely to get little rain the first few months on the PCT. I had to give up some nice features like pit zips but the weight savings was worth it and it did keep me dry.

                        I have some Red Ledge raingear hanging in my closet right now and will be using it this year again. It's inexpensive enough so when the seam tape starts peeling it can just be replaced. I've always gotten at least one thru-hike (months straight) out of each jacket.

                        I recommend testing out your rain gear before heading afield. There seems to be some lemons in most rain gear. The first expensive rain gear I bought leaked like crazy.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sdrhunter View Post
                          thanks for the recommendation. what do you wear for pants?
                          Shane, You won't go wrong with the Typhoon jacket, its the higher end pac-lite material, the same material used in the "New" Army ECWCS rain gear made by ADS Tactical. They call it a typhoon jacket because it was tested in a pressurized water room with a person wearing it. It is a higher line up from the precip. Is there better? I'm sure there is, but there will always be better as time goes on, no matter how much you upgrade. Not sure who has any in stock, AMH, Rei, and Sports Authority actually had them at one time. however they are somewhat hard to find in Alaska, I saw one in Sports Auth. and decided to go back and they were sold out.
                          As far as Rain pants.....I don't take one, when I'm sheep hunting, the pants I normally wear are water repellant anyways, Arcteryx, Mammut, westcombs etc. and I have hiked through torrential downpours, and those pants dry pretty fast. If worst comes to worst, I'll throw a sil tarp or my footprint over my whole body and hunker down until the rains pass. Looks like your last sheep hunt you had fairly decent weather according to your vids......one can only hope for the same.

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                          • #14
                            thanks chuck, i have a ton of diff options but this guy coming up from lower 48 to go with me this yr. is much bigger than me and my stuff wont fit. he is looking for a cheaper alternative than the sitka stormfront which cost an arm and leg. thanks for your input.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Buck Nelson View Post
                              ...I recommend testing out your rain gear before heading afield. There seems to be some lemons in most rain gear. The first expensive rain gear I bought leaked like crazy.
                              Sage advice. Thanks for your post here, Buck.
                              No habitat, no hunter.

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