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RVs & frost heaves

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  • RVs & frost heaves

    Are there any travel trailers that hold up to the frost heaves on the highway? We have an ultra lite & load it somewhat heavy. We don't go roaring over the heaves or anything, but they are brutal & we've suffered damage from time to time. Looking at getting something beefier- but I wonder if ANY of them are resistant to those roads with all of the bumps. Lots between Haines & tok & some toward Denali.

  • #2
    Are you using a sway control hitch?
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    • #3
      While we do not have a travel trailer, we have found that the best bet in our motor home is to just slow down! The section of road between Beaver creek and Burwash landing is about the worst!

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      • #4
        I guess we dont use a sway control hitch (because i don't know what that is- I will look into it).

        Yes, we go SO slow- especially in the area you mentioned. Sometimes there's just a dip in the middle of an otherwise decent road- and even when going slow it feels like we're gonna tear the heck out of the trailer.

        I assume that some are built beefier than others & not sure which to look at next time around.

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        • #5
          It sounds like you may have cracks in the frame. That why it flexing so much. Instead of waiting for something to happen you should take it to a welding shop and have the trailer inspected for cracks or a bent frame. They could also beef up the weak areas.

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          • #6
            Most travel trailers use Lippert frames, which aren't worth a sh^*#. Arctic Fox builds their own frames in house and advertises them as off road frames. They also build the Nash line of TT. Expensive tho.

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            • #7
              thanks for the ideas. I will keep watching the thread. Good info on the Arctic Fox. Hoping there are other worthy brands as well (that are built tough!). We are looking for a new (used) one- probably a toy hauler & its great to have some ideas on what has worked for folks driving some of the same roads.

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              • #8
                This is what my draw bar looked like on a Forrest River Coachman 223 RBS after coming out from Lake Louise. Original Draw bar was C channel. Trailercraft built a replacement out of full tube channel.
                Click image for larger version

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by hilfikerkg View Post
                  This is what my draw bar looked like on a Forrest River Coachman 223 RBS after coming out from Lake Louise. Original Draw bar was C channel. Trailercraft built a replacement out of full tube channel.
                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]95242[/ATTACH]
                  Wow....that musta been a little scary...???!!!
                  Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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                  • #10
                    A manufacturer in Canada builds trailers (or did) that use plywood rather than OSB in the construction. All around built better. TravelAire I think is the name.
                    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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