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Rem 700 help

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  • Rem 700 help

    Dear Sirs, can anybody give ideas how to get fore end "pressure points" back to my Remington 700 CDL. cal 30-06 wood, stainless, fluted barrel. Some time ago I decided to glass bed the action and free float the barrel but after that my groups opened up some. Before I was able to shoot close to MOA but after free floating it went to 1.5MOA. Yes I have shot several different brands and bullet weights. I do not load myself but shoot factory loads. When I free floated the barrel I filed the fore end pressure point out but now I'd like to try whether putting it back will help to get better groups. Thanks

  • #2
    A simply option to replicate the points would be tape. Build up the area on the stock with electrical tape to see if your accuracy improves. Once you find the spot you're looking for measure the thickness of the tape and premanently build the area back up with resin to that thickness. Be sure and check the bedding on your receiver to make sure you have it correct.

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    • #3
      I hate to say this because it is so basic. But I have done it and admit it.

      Have you checked to make sure everything is screwed down correctly and tight? While checking that, do not only the action to the stock but the scope screws as well.
      NRA Life Member since 1974

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      • #4
        IMO there is accuracy and then there is "accuracy." Free floating is a preferred method of bedding most rifles, though it is true that some few will improve with some (perhaps full) barrel contact. That is not to say that the improvement is helpful nor that in the field it is noticeable. In fact, a very good case can be made to free float wood stocks that are used in the field simply because moisture left unchecked can cause warping and that will definitely affect accuracy and normally in a very negative way (I'm confident hap will jump in with this comment and remind me what a poor decision my free floated McMillan's areroud.

        I'll join boilep's chorus and make certain every possible screw is adequately tight. I'd also suggest that if you free float a barrel that you should mean it and make certain that there is no contact between the barrel and the barrel channel. No contact is normally great; firm contact is normally okay, but a little bit of contact is always to be avoided...
        Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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