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  • Nosler Accubonds

    Hello All:

    How do the .338 Win (200 gr) and .375 (260 gr) Ruger Accubonds hold together on elk, moose and bear? On the 375 I have also loaded some 270 gr TSX to try. :question:

    Thanks,

    Silver Tip
    "If we lose freedom here, there is no other place to escape to. This is the last stand on earth." ...Ronald Reagan.....please never forget this!!!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Silver Tip View Post
    Hello All:

    How do the .338 Win (200 gr) and .375 (260 gr) Ruger Accubonds hold together on elk, moose and bear? On the 375 I have also loaded some 270 gr TSX to try. :question:

    Thanks,

    Silver Tip
    Can't say about the 200 grain .338, but I load the 260 in a friend's 375 H&H and he absolutely flattened a moose this past fall. There are various opinions and experiences floating around concerning the ABs, but in this case it was devastating. FWIW, smashing a bull moose stresses a bullet more than an elk or a bear IMO so I'd have no hesitation on the 260 with any of the critters you mentioned.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    • #3
      While I don't have any experience with 200gn Accubonds in .338, I have taken numerous animals with a 325WSM using 200gn Accubonds.
      When I started working up my Accubond loads I only intended to hunt black bears and sheep with them. However, after taking a few animals with them and seeing the results I finished the season out with them and use them for everything except coastal bears. I found them extremely accurate and hard hitting. I put them into Black bear, grizzly, sheep, moose and a goat this last year and they performed to my satisfaction flying straight, killing efficiently and retaining their weight on impact. I'm sure the .338s will preform as well.

      All the ones I recovered looked just like this one.



      Steve
      "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

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      • #4
        No experience with the .338 versions but the 180gr .308 version has done really well for me. No recovered bullets, just big gaping exit wounds. The 260gr. .375 is a stone cold killer.
        "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hodgeman View Post
          No experience with the .338 versions but the 180gr .308 version has done really well for me. No recovered bullets, just big gaping exit wounds. The 260gr. .375 is a stone cold killer.
          And there is my big problem with any bimetal bullet... The extreme bloodshot meat waste around the wound channel with everything but the monolithic stuff is unacceptable to me. My limited experience with the Accu-bombs has shown 100% recovered bullets at extended ranges, excess bloodshot meat, less than complete penetration, and a premium price tag. I cannot think of a single good reason to use them.

          When the Accu-bomb went to Africa the first time a number of the gun writers had serious issues with them. Some ignored them and wrote glowingly of their exploits. They are not to be believed (ever again) but some expressed concerns... They would be one of my last choices, though they would likely be just fine the vast majority of the time. I hate paying premium prices for nonpremium items.
          art

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          • #6
            Originally posted by hap View Post

            I hate paying premium prices for nonpremium items.
            art
            $28 a box is hardly a premium price for factory ammo these days. Heck corelokts for my gun are $22 usually.

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            • #7
              Well, I guess everyone has their own opinion, but I've been extremely satisfied with Accubonds and so has everyone I know who uses them. I use 140 gr. in my 270 and 180 in my '06. Haven't killed anything with them in the '06 yet, but have killed moose and bou with the 270. I haven't personally seen "excessive" bloodshot meat and have yet to recover a bullet.
              We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
              James Madison

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              • #8
                I think you'll be happy with both Accubonds and the TSX. I'm not shooting exactly the same setups as you but have shot both bullets. I've been shooting 225gr TSX in my 338 for a couple years and have taken a bison and a moose. Can't complain about the bullet performance on either animal.

                This year I shot 200gr Accubonds in my 3252wsm and took a moose, goat, and blackbear, all with one shot kills. Pass throughs on goat and blackie and forgot about trying to find the one in the moose.

                If they shoot good out of your gun then you'll be happy with your choices.

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                • #9
                  I've got buddies that love them and I have been in on several kills where they were employed. While the majority of the time they've performed as advertised there were two occasions with the 200gr .325 version that left something to be desired. In both cases the range was normal, IE 150-200yds, and the bullets completely came unglued, pieces everywhere. One of those failed to break the spine on a grizzly, after only penetrating about 3-4 inches of hide and flesh. Those experiences make me reluctant to recommend them, I would stick with the tsx.

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                  • #10
                    I've used the .358" 225gr version for a couple of years now and have had 2 instances that left me scratching my head on white-tails. In both instances there were .358" holes going in and going out. I had to search to find the exit wounds. The lungs were liquified both times so they did their job, but tracking was an issue on one because there was NO blood. The other was a bang/flop. I've never recovered one of the bullets from ranges between 10 yds and 215 yds. I did shoot a 350 lb. pig this year with one that did not exit, but I took the pig to the butcher and forgot to tell him I wanted the bullet. It was a slightly quartering away shot at about 90 yds. I'm sure it was lodged it the off-side shoulder armor.

                    In my opinion, at least in .358", the Accubonds are pretty affordable. That's why I started using them. They are anywhere from $15-20 cheaper for 50 than other premiums. Even partitions cost quite a bit more.

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                    • #11
                      The Kid - the AB's you mention might have been of the "original" version, Nosler reengineered them (at least once) soon after release to make them "tougher" - the whole scheme of the Accubond was to yield as near to partition performance as possible and ballistic tip accuracy - in my limited experience they do both - I have a good friend who guides in AK Spring and Fall for brown/griz and he now SWEARS by a 300 ultra mag with 180 Scirrocco II's, says they HAMMER them (that wouldn't be my choice as long as TB's or TSX's are available but that's me ... I'll bet if a guy used and heaviest for caliber ie: 338/250 or 308/200, etc.. there wouldn't be much negative feedback though

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