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Scope for a .458 Lott...

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  • Scope for a .458 Lott...

    Looking at mounting a low power scope to my Lott, wanted to know if anyone out there has done this and what scope did you go with?? Looking at a 2-7 Leupold, or maybe a Burris. I have been reading about how the 458 can and will destroy scopes of a lower end. Any insite or direction would greatly be appreciated. Thanks in advance

    B&C 04
    "A vote is like a rifle: its usefulness depends upon the character of the user." T. R.

  • #2
    I've run Leupold 1.5-5 Vari-X III and Leupold 3-9 Vari-X IIc with no problems on a Custom .458 Lott. I'll have to say, I'm somewhat biased. Leupold is one of only three scope manufacturers I retail, their truly superior customer service by phone with warranty performance is unmatched, plus I've chosen something from Leupold 10 to 1 as my trustworthy personal picks over others.

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    • #3
      I have got some great deals right now on Swarovski, but if that is too rich for your blood, 1.5-5 Leu or 1-4x Trij

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      • #4
        just be sure to get the model with a "lott" of eye relief.
        Mike
        Mike
        www.alaskaatvclub.org
        There is a faster way off the mountain, might hurt a little though.:eek:

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        • #5
          If a variable is a must have item then I'd go with a 1.5x5 Leupold. If not then I'd consider a 2.5X Leupold Ultralight or one of Leupold's recently reintroduced 3X scopes from their custom shop. I'd lean towards the 3X, but that's the kind of guy I am. All of these scopes provide great value, extreme durability, good optics and all the magnification a person needs for a 458 Lott IMO.
          Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mike Echo View Post
            just be sure to get the model with a "lott" of eye relief.
            Mike
            No pun intended right??
            "A vote is like a rifle: its usefulness depends upon the character of the user." T. R.

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            • #7
              I've got the Leupold 1.5x5 on my 458 and it's been great absolutely no complaints. However I have a Leupold 2.5UL on the Whelen and it would be an excellent choice as well, I think it might even have slightly more eye relief. One of those would be my pick and I might lean toward the 2.5 to save some bucks considering the ranges you'll be shooting with that rifle. I wouldn't worry about either of those scopes coming apart, but if you do Leupold claims their 1.75-6 is the toughest model they make.

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              • #8
                Definitely depends on what will be the most likely scenarios you'll find yourself in. A well made .458 Lott with a good trigger finger behind it will surprise many folks on accuracy firing both .458 Lott and .458 WIN MAG. Not calling these kinds of rifles versatility kings... yet they are able to stretch it out range-wise and very accurate when you practice getting to know the cartridges.

                The 1.5-5x Leupold is a great match to this kind of rifle (reliable for Alaska conditions, good eye-relief, decent magnification, steadfast warranty #1 in customer service, made in USA, etc.)... however, ya might consider a 2-7x or 3-9x to proof loads on target paper and enjoy this range of magnification for general shooting. Ya might even have one of these laying around or atop another rifle for a test run before getting a new scope. That's what I did --- mine wears a VariX IIc 3-9x40 on Quick Detach rings and bases. My rifle and scope combo will cloverleaf a nice group at 100 yards with the Hornady factory loads.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Brian Richardson View Post
                  Definitely depends on what will be the most likely scenarios you'll find yourself in. A well made .458 Lott with a good trigger finger behind it will surprise many folks on accuracy firing both .458 Lott and .458 WIN MAG. Not calling these kinds of rifles versatility kings... yet they are able to stretch it out range-wise and very accurate when you practice getting to know the cartridges.

                  The 1.5-5x Leupold is a great match to this kind of rifle (reliable for Alaska conditions, good eye-relief, decent magnification, steadfast warranty #1 in customer service, made in USA, etc.)... however, ya might consider a 2-7x or 3-9x to proof loads on target paper and enjoy this range of magnification for general shooting. Ya might even have one of these laying around or atop another rifle for a test run before getting a new scope. That's what I did --- mine wears a VariX IIc 3-9x40 on Quick Detach rings and bases. My rifle and scope combo will cloverleaf a nice group at 100 yards with the Hornady factory loads.
                  I've used the Lott last fall for Grizz. and will be using it in Zimbabwe next year for Elephant, Cape Buff and Lion. I'm expecting 200 yard or under for this spring Brown hunt and for now a scope is viable option, now for next year the scope will be left at home. Had "The Kid" build my Lott last summer and just love it, figure I will keep hammering on the big bears until the big hunt next year...I found a Leup. for a good price and fittin to give it a go and see what happens.
                  "A vote is like a rifle: its usefulness depends upon the character of the user." T. R.

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                  • #10
                    A guy from the Leupold Custom Shop told me the VXIII 1.75 x 6 32mm is the toughest variable powered scope they make and I think Mark Bansner uses it on rifles they make. Make a couple of calls to them as the Lott has quite the scope eating reputation. As much as I like my 1.5 x5 with the German #4 I like my 1.75 x 6 with the Post/Duplex reticle from Leupold's Custom Shop better.

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                    • #11
                      Just my $.02, but I gave a 1.75x6 Vari-X III to a buddy of mine. He really liked it & still does, but I must admit I never did. I certainly will not argue with those that have spoken to Leupold concerning their scopes durability more recently than I have, but for the past many years they promoted the 2.5X UL as the most durable model, at least from a recoil perspective.
                      Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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                      • #12
                        I was down at Mt. View and they have a Swarovski 1-6x in the case. If you want scope lust, start there! I'm not kidding you, it's got half again as much field of view of any other low power scope made. Putting the Leupold in the case next to it, well, there's just no comparison in any regard. But for 1700 clams, what would you expect!!!

                        I'm in the same scope hunting boat. I picked up a Burris 1.75-5x at Bdocks for a drastically reduced price. It has fantastic optics and a lighted reticle. Burris's warranty is a good one too.

                        One scope that I looked through that I almost bought was a Leupold with really heavy bars in it. If you're not going lit reticles, I think this scope is awesome for quick acquisition. The only reason I didn't get it is because the bars WERE really thick and I'd like to think that if I had to give a long shot a try, I wouldn't like having that thick bar in the way. After all, at only 5-6 power, a thick bar would cover up half a critter at a couple of hundred yards right?

                        Bdocks has quite a few low power scopes on hand to look through, then there's my heart's desire at Mt.View. Good grief what a scope.

                        Burris has always performed well for me.

                        Vortex makes a few low power scopes and their warranty is a no-matter-WHAT warranty. How 'bout that? I've only looked through their spotters.

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                        • #13
                          My old 3X and 2.5 Leupold did not have as much eye relief as my old 2.5 x 8 3 6mm Vari X III Leupold did when it was set on 2.5. One of the great things about most Leupold scopes is their generous eye relief and light weight. Lets talk about field of view. I guess a scope can't have to much, but how hard is it to point a rifle at a critter once you have spotted it. I shoot with both eyes open so field of view does not top my list on desirable scope qualities. I go by this list and for me Leupold does well with this criteria. Are their better scopes costing 2 or 3 times more, oh yeah, but are they really 2 or 3 times better?

                          reliability
                          warranty
                          clarity
                          ability to transmit available light
                          eye relief
                          weight
                          length
                          cost

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                          • #14
                            1/2 again the FOV ?? now THAT's a tall order even for a Swarovski ! As far as Leupold scopes go, as soon as you leave the VX3 line you are getting into the competetive with European stuff - the thing I like about Leupolds is that they figured out a long time back that the heavier the scope is the more harsh the beating it takes and they began engineering lighter "alloy" components - As you descend from the VX3 to the "ultralights" you give up FOV and some other things for the sake of an ounce or 2 - (just me talking now) I LOVE the looks of the 1.5 x 5 on a rifle, it just has "that look" about it but for the real world and IF you have to have a variable then I like the 2.5 x 8 alot (VX3) Leupold's warranty is second to none and leaps ahead of most others BUT that doesn't do any good in the bush, mechanical stuff breaks and then we ALL hear about it but just think about all those scopes out there being bounced around in trucks, on ATV's, rolled on by horses (been there, done that) lenses wiped off with the cuff of a wool shirt (or worse), the ratio is pretty low from my view - 4X or 6X are tougher too, how could either do you wrong ?

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                            • #15
                              Well, it does seem incredible, but the Leupold line is 75' at best at 100 yards. The Swarovski 1-6 is a 127'. Awesome eh? Then there's that clarity and complete lack of distortion that you'd expect for that kind of money. On top of that, you get a 6x scope which which is a pretty useful tool for longer shooting.

                              I don't mean to be condescending here but, FOV is extremely important for quick acquisition. Your targeting eye being at different magnification fools your brain, even if you are capable of leaving your other eye open, it's darned near useless when one eye's viewing a magnified image and the other's not (brains just work that way) That's why most folks squint and competitive shooters wear eye patches. The Swarovski scope at one power truly lets you keep both eyes open AND have your targeting crosshairs available. The difference between the Swarovski and the Leupold (and others like the Burris I bought) is astounding. All the other scopes are like having a cardboard tube in front of you and the Swarovski is not. Pretty spectacular.

                              I couldn't afford the Swarovski right now. But thinking on it, I should've told my wife that the ability to quickly acquire the target that is known as ursus arctos in time would be a LOT cheaper than even a minor and short visit to the clinic or ER (or caretaker!)

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