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Firearms trivia question April 16th

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  • akrifle
    replied
    Good info.

    I think you are correct about the round development, but I always heard that they decided on the straight bolt due to so many guys having to line up and shoot on one side of a ship. There simply was no elbow room for rechambering another round. Could be a wives tale, just what I heard. I also heard that the straight bolt led to the development of auto rifles.

    Did we get the idea from the Swiss or vice-versa?

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  • brav01
    replied
    Guns

    Originally posted by FLtoAK05 View Post
    I think I read somewhere that the Navy/Marines used a 6mm Lee cal machine-gun made by Colt.

    BGiddens
    YES, the Browning "Potato Digger" was chambered in the 6mm Lee Navy; and used in the S-A War.

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  • FLtoAK05
    replied
    I see it now......Its fun picking our brains though.

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  • FLtoAK05
    replied
    I think I read somewhere that the Navy/Marines used a 6mm Lee cal machine-gun made by Colt.

    BGiddens

    Leave a comment:


  • Float Pilot
    replied
    YES THE STRAIGHT PULL BOLT.

    Well actually the Lee Navy was a semi straight pull. You have to pull up slightly and then back. the bolt comes back at an upward angle. It really looks weird.

    The Lee Navy was also called the Model of 1895.
    So it had been around for a couple years by the time of the Spanish American War in 1898.

    They were later phased out and replaced with 30 caliber rifles around the 1903 to 1906 time period. Winchester built a sporting version few a few more years after that.

    Part of the reason the Navy and Marines adopted the 6mm was that they required the bullet to penetrate steel boiler plate at certain ranges. The 30 US ARMY (30-40 Krag) was not able to do what they needed. They were thinking about being able to disable steam launches and the like in harbors and rivers. Remember the Marines and Navy were engaged in advetures in China for many years against pirates and warlords.
    Attached Files

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  • akrifle
    replied
    Straight pull bolt.

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  • mauserboy
    replied
    Straight pull bolt

    was the mechanism requested.

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  • hunt_ak
    replied
    The box magazine? Good link here...

    Leave a comment:


  • rifleshooter
    replied
    Bonus

    Bonus question:

    Would that be the bolt mechanism that the British adopted?

    Leave a comment:


  • rifleshooter
    replied
    Good question

    Good question, thanks for the education. I was surprised that noboby guessed the very short lived US cal .30-03, which was quickly changed a little to make the 30-06. There was also the very short lived .50-70 that quickly erroded chambers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Float Pilot
    replied
    YES THE 6mm LEE NAVY.

    While the Navy and Marine had used the 45-70 at one time with the REmington-Keene rifles, they were the first US Service to try a fairly high speed and small caliber rifle.

    The 6mm Lee Navy.

    Which was also the first US cartidridge to use a metric designation.

    It was also the first US rifle to use a stripper clip for loading the magazine.

    The Lee Navy had such a good trajectory that Winchester actually had to add more property to their test range.

    The Navy and Marines used this caliber in the Lee Rifle and in Colt Machhine Guns.

    The WINNERS ARE :::::

    1. Darreld Walton.....6mm Lee Navy
    Predecessor of the .220 Swift, perchance.....?


    2.rbuck351....6mm Lee I think is what the navy was using at that time. And it is the parent case for the 220 swift.


    3. henry2......6mm lee round i think that would be the round they use at the time along with the 30 cal krag rifle round for which i think was a 30-40.cal typle of round


    4.jguy.357
    Lee 6mm
    +1 for the 6mm.


    BONUS QUESTION??????

    What was the most noticeable mechanism on the Lee Navy Rifle? It was the only widely issued US rifle to date, that used this...

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  • jguy.357
    replied
    Lee 6mm

    +1 for the 6mm.

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  • henry2
    replied
    6mm lee round i think that would be the round they use at the time along with the 30 cal krag rifle round for which i think was a 30-40.cal typle of round

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  • rbuck351
    replied
    6mm Lee I think is what the navy was using at that time. And it is the parent case for the 220 swift.

    Leave a comment:


  • MontanaRifleman
    replied
    I think the 30-40 Krag and the .06 are both possibilities and lean to the 30-40 Krag

    Leave a comment:

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