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9.3 x 62 effectiveness in sorting out big bears?

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  • 9.3 x 62 effectiveness in sorting out big bears?

    Does anyone have any experience with the 9.3 X 62 as a big bear stopper? I am reconsidering my choice of light stopper, and going with the Tikka T3 Battue in 9.3. Does anyone here have any hands on experience with this gem? The quick acquisition sights, 20 inch barrel, and accuracy reputation makes this a top draft choice for the lighter end of the spectrum in my eyes. I have a heavy stopper, but light can be handy thus carried more often, since I am not talking hunting, only protection duty. Protection only is like an off duty gun for cops: when carrying, the lightest gun ever is best; if a gunfight breaks out, the heaviest & biggest gun is best! But, and there always is a but in life, if you have neither in hand due to convenience or lack of, you are in deep ****!

    The 9.3 can shoot 320 grain Woodleighs at a respective speed!

  • #2
    I sure don't like the idea of a push feed action for a bear gun no matter how smooth the Tikkas are. You can get a real nice CZ 550 in 9.3X62 that would suit well.
    375 Ruger Hawkeye...Mice to Moose, Impala to Buffalo....1 GUN.....WORLDS PURSUIT

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    • #3
      Idaho, a few years back I would have agreed with you about the push feed comment. But after having significant reliability issues with a Ruger CRF, and hearing all the bad things about the Kimbers, I think push feed vs. CRF is no longer the right question. The right question is: who makes a reliable gun, regardless of action type? I think Tikka and CZ both do, so it's a matter of personal preference. What I can tell you from personal experience is that I've never had reliability issues with a push feed, but have with a CRF. Take that for what it's worth because I haven't handled the number of rifles that many on this site have. Just one dude's experience...

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      • #4
        Funny you should say that. I have a CZ 550 in .458 Lott for my heavy. I want a light one as well, for me and others to use on my fishing trip... Lets hope if needed the first shot does it job, so it doesn't matter... I imagine in a lot of situations that is all the shots you may get anyway...

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        • #5
          idahotrophyhunter
          Member
          Join Date: Feb 2008
          Location: Boise, Idaho
          Posts: 196




          I sure don't like the idea of a push feed action for a bear gun no matter how smooth the Tikkas are. You can get a real nice CZ 550 in 9.3X62 that would suit well.
          __________________
          1 DREAM...North American Grand Slam... 1 Rifle...375 H&H...Lifes Pursuit.



          The CZ 550 FS with a full stock comes in 9.3 and looks interesting!

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          • #6
            Turn a PF upside down and suprise yourself by cycling rounds through it without trouble. So what does CRF bring to the table? Superior extraction capabilities.

            All CRF have a superior Mauser type extractor. Big. Strong. Hard to break. Superior on a dangerous game rifle. If you can't get the first one out, you won't get the second one in. You seem to want a stopper for close in protection. May I suggest the 9.3x57 built on an Intermediate Yugo action? Even though I would go 9.3x62 for a hunting round at 250 yds. a 9.3x57 gives up little at short distances, if anything.

            So what do you get?

            A "short action" saving weight.
            At close range, the same power of the x62.
            Light weight rifle with controlled feed.
            Readily available actions for $100.
            The Mauser extractor

            Now, for what I'd do. I'd build something on the .358 round. Again a Yugo action in .358 win. using either Woodleigh or Barnes bullets. And heavy for caliber ones at that. Why? Because it's easier to get a tube in .358 win than 9.3x57. You get almost the same power as the x57 and easier to build. And theres no moss on the back of a .358 win in handloads. And because the Yugo is not a true short action, you can set those big 310gr Woodleighs out some. Just get the tube long chambered. Woodleighs available up to 310gr. Barnes up to 225gr. I'd load a 250gr or if this is truely solely for protection, a 310gr. Woodleigh .......and go for shot placement. The 310gr is rated at 1800-2200 fps. You'd likely fall in that range. Still think the 250gr is better suited for a short case like the .358. And why I'd likely go that route.

            Again, all this is considering close range, which I consider to be less than 50 yds. Just something to think on.

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            • #7
              But could I lay my hands on a 9.3x57 tube.........thats the way I'd go. Shorter, lighter stronger, and still have the best x-tractor yet invented.

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              • #8
                I agree the CRF is the best route, thus my .458 Lott as my heavy, but, why does the lever gun seem to get a pass on Alaska forums? I seriously do not think that a lever gun is more reliable than a push feed quality gun. I have a custom shop Remington 350 Mag, and it has always been reliable. I also have a Browning model 81 takedown in 450 Marlin, which is my current light carry rifle for Alaska, and my travel in small places rifle. Nothing like it for carrying in on a bike, or a small plane... But, I do not consider the Browning more reliable than my push feed Remington!
                Last edited by Proud American; 04-09-2009, 20:21. Reason: adding a few words

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                • #9
                  Good call,



                  A .450 Marlin or modern action in 45.70 may be called for. You brought up a whole new list of cal.'s Thinkin' that most went bolt action since you described a round as such (9.3x62). But you have a couple rounds in the discussion. And there are a couple good ones.


                  Anyone for the .405?

                  We are talking close range stoppers here. The only problem is you stated is you wanted a "light" stopper. Still think the .450, 45.70 and .405 fit in this range. Just buy a 9.3x57 for light weight and power. AND you'll be the only one on the block.
                  http://www.chuckhawks.com/9-3x57_mauser.htm
                  And all that fitted to an action of the proper size, with lots of power. You did state light weight stopper....no?
                  All that fitted to a small ring Mauser action, save money over buying a Yugo and building......look here.
                  http://www.buffalobrothers.net/guns/...&ordertype=ASC
                  Several available.
                  $350 and done + transfer fee. Ready built close range stopper. Add scope as desired. But for your needs for close range, I'd settle upon the irons. Or as my aged eyes prefer, maybe a peep for the rear?

                  You'll not be disappointed.

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                  • #10
                    Here's my pick. With the addition of a peep on the rear Williams base. You're looking at money. http://www.newenglandcustomgun.com/index.html?Peep%20sight.htm~maindeal9.3x57 with peeps. You may have to replace the front blade for something higher. But no big deal. Peeps are known to be rugged. bang around and still at your zero as needed.

                    Light rig, quick sighting for close range, light stopper.


                    http://www.buffalobrothers.net/guns/..._x_57_043s.jpg

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                    • #11
                      Proud American,

                      Excellent call on that Tikka Battue chambered for 9.3x62. The rifle only weighs a little under 7 pounds. It's one of the best looking guns I've personally ever laid eyes on. I already own the CZ fieldstocked, but I want a Battue also. I've been wanting one of those Battues for a long time. Tikkas don't have a reputation for jamming, and the long, slender 9.3x62 with decent case taper has no issues loading or extracting. With that said....my "rough and tumble" rifle is a 358 BLR. Though some have talked of malfunction, I've never had an issue. The way I see it......if you don't have enough sense to check your rifle often and make sure it's oiled and free of debris, and it jams up.....that's your own fault. These darn rifles cost a lot of hard earned dollars, who in the heck wants to bash the action closed knowing it's full of debris? Young soldiers are instructed to keep their rifles clean and oiled.....why would someone have an issue with that concept in bear country? Regardless of all the blabber about a push feed or a CRF......it makes more sense to keep whatever bear protection rifle you tote clean and oiled don't you think?
                      www.freightercanoes.com www.copperheadalaska.com
                      sigpic
                      matnaggewinu

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                      • #12
                        looks good...

                        That caliber and a tough bullet should work just fine. Just a little slower and almost the same diamater as the great .375 H&H.

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                        • #13

                          "Though some have talked of malfunction, I've never had an issue. The way I see it......if you don't have enough sense to check your rifle often and make sure it's oiled and free of debris, and it jams up.....that's your own fault. These darn rifles cost a lot of hard earned dollars, who in the heck wants to bash the action closed knowing it's full of debris? Young soldiers are instructed to keep their rifles clean and oiled.....why would someone have an issue with that concept in bear country? Regardless of all the blabber about a push feed or a CRF......it makes more sense to keep whatever bear protection rifle you tote clean and oiled don't you think?"


                          I also have a BLR, a model 81 lightweight takedown in 450 Marlin. I Have not had it long enough to comment on its reliability. I am sure that if you stick twigs and dirt in a Marlin it will have problems as well. The Browning is stronger and you can use heavy loads way over the 42,000 pressure limit of the Marlin. Just like issure army rifles of today, you do and should keep them clean and free of debris. Overwise the army would still be using O3/A3 bolt guns! I still like my mauser actions and CRF, but in some cases too heavy means nothing will be in hand when needed. It is better to compromise from the ultimate at times for anything that will work in your case.

                          A long time ago I asked my friend Cotton Gordon, a well known African Pro who lives in Colorado Springs, what gun was best in a lion charge? Old Cotton looked at me like I was stupid, and gave me the old cliché, "Whatever rifle is in your hands!"
                          Last edited by Proud American; 04-10-2009, 08:38. Reason: add quote marks

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                          • #14
                            good choice

                            I think the Tikka you described would be great for the purpose you described. As you said you already have a heavy hitter, but you want something lighter to carry. I think the Tikkas are very reliable, and you will enjoy it for general hunting too.

                            Where's the problem? It may be within your posting where you referred to a "stopper". Now there's an argument waiting to happen. Personally I don't consider anything less than a 458 WM a true "stopper". That said, I shot a brown bear with a 9.3x62 and it rolled over and balled, and I shot it again before it could get up. Granted the first shot hit it in the shoulder and went all the way through, and the bear was not a really big one, and it was not charging. All these factors make a difference. When deer hunting in S.E. Alaska I feel pretty comfortable carrying my 9.3x62 - a heck of a lot better than carrying my 30-06.

                            All that said, I'm having a 458 WM assembled, with a light barrel on a Ruger stainless CRF action, Hogue stock, which I intend to carry as my light stopper, for summer carry on the salmon and trout streams. I'll use it on moose too if i get the chance. Handloads of choice = 400 gr Swift, hot.

                            But I'm keeping the 9.3x62, which is on a FN Mauser action.

                            Another thing, if I wanted maximum effect, penetration and thump from the 9.3x62, it wouldn't be the heavy woodleigh. My choice would be the 286 gr Barnes TSX.

                            KB

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                            • #15
                              Good information and story! My heavy is a .458 Lott, which as you know shoots .458 WM as well... I have used swift on bear before, a huge 600 pound Northern Alberta Blackie... It worked well, but just recently since getting on this forum, I have heard a few problems come up in regard to the Swift bullet. Some have had the front half break away from the rear half. This is why I am considering North Folk bullets, or Kodiaks... I Have factory Federal 500 grain Trophy bonded for my Lott, but I heard that some of the new Federal Trophy bonded that are nickled plated are having problems, and Federal has suspended selling components because of it.

                              I am also considering using the North Folk bullets for my Browning BLR takedown in 450 Marlin as well...
                              Last edited by Proud American; 04-10-2009, 21:50. Reason: add a space

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