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  • asrjb25
    replied
    You already put your order in, but I would like to say, you made a fine choice. I bought a Fullfield II for my Howa .338 which is my first rifle. I spent hours and hours reading reviews and opinions and decided on the Fullfield II and have been very pleased. Mounted it myself, zeroed it, and took my first moose with it, and can't think of anything bad to say about it.

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  • Vek
    replied
    Don't know what my problem is, my choice of scopes keeps getting smaller and smaller. I just sold off my VX3 2.5x8, and now my most powerful scope is a leupold VX2 2x7. I'm getting to the point that the 36mm objective on my fixed 6x leupold looks too doggone big hanging out there in the breeze. I'll grudgingly use it for sheep next year, but might swap it out for a straight tube 1.5x5 by that time. In my mind, smaller is lighter, and smaller is tougher. 4x (or less) will allow shooting out to most anyone's maximum responsible range.

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  • ak hunter
    replied
    Well, I cancelled the Cabelas AK Guide Premium scope that was on back order, and have a Burris Fullfield II 3-9X40 on the way. It will hopefully prove to be a durable scope and hold a zero well. It looks well made with nice features, especially for the price.
    Now I just need to decide if I'm going to try and use rubber cement in the rings or shallac or rosin, and whether I should use Locktite on the screws or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • CZ_IN_AK
    replied
    Leupy...

    The 1.75x6 VXIII was designed with a longer scope tube so it could fit on the long actions of the bigger magnums! So I'd say you'd proll'y be safe with it.

    Jake

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  • TN_Hillbilly
    replied
    No prob

    Originally posted by ak hunter View Post
    TN Hillbilly,

    After droping your rifle/scope, was the zero still the same or did that drop on the concrete cause a shift?
    I was in the process of zeroing it when I dropped it, but I didn't notice any shift. The Ruger rings probably helped!

    Leave a comment:


  • danattherock
    replied
    Originally posted by ak hunter View Post

    I believe I will cancel the Cabelas AK Guide Premium scope that is on back order with Cabelas and replace it with the Fullfield model.

    .

    This sounds like a great decision to me

    Leave a comment:


  • marshall
    replied
    Originally posted by ak hunter View Post
    I guess the fact that the Burris models have the entire eye piece rotate when you change the power would be a downside for some, but I don't use flip open lens caps, so it wouldn't be an issue for me.

    Last September out west of the Mulchatna river on a small lake my brother and I were in 6 straight days of rain during our moose hunt. I was glad to have pop up covers on my leupold VX-7 1.5-6X24. It has preformed very well under 250 plus shots from my .375 Ruger with no problems holding zero. The covers kept the lens dry and clear of fog.

    The Nikon scope that I'm considering for my .308 is planned for a fall elk hunt down here in Arizona. I haven't narrowed it down yet but one thing for sure I don't want to buy anything until I touch, smell, and feel it.

    The lens caps probably wont be an issue down here since rain is a novilty in AZ, Alaska is an other story.

    As far as Burris goes, I like the XTR 312 in olive drab.

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  • .338 mag.
    replied
    eye relief = Leupold.....

    Most of those Leupolds have good eye relief. A good feature on a brown bear hunt in my opinion. I have a 1/2 dozen or so of them. One that is neat is a 1.75x6 by 32 mm VXIII that I had the Leupold Custom Shop put the post/duplex reticle in. I also have the 1.5x5 by 20 mm VXIII and had the German #4 reticle put in it. My personal .338 wears an old 2.5x8 by 36 mm Vari X III with the standard duplex reticle. On their low setting they are all what I consider fast and easy to use. The first 2 would be top choices for any dedicated brown bear hunt. The 2.5x8 is my favorite "all around scope". It has been in use for at least 15 years or more. Most of the shots taken with it were on 2.5 power. They all set in Warne quick detach rings. The screws for the bases have a dab of blue Lock Tite on them and the ring screws don't. The red Lock Tite sets up to hard for gun screw use. All of them were tightened down with a Warne torque wrench. Any one of the 3 will serve you well. Buy one of each.

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  • mainer_in_ak
    replied
    Ak Hunter,
    The red locktite has a higher temp, it does the same thing. You only need a dab on each screw. lap the rings and clean the scope tube and inside surface of rings with alchohol to remove any trace of oil. Some scope rings on the market actually recommend lock tight on the screws. Also make sure that there is no oil on the screws either. Good luck on that bear hunt.

    Leave a comment:


  • ak hunter
    replied
    mainer in ak,

    I have a set of Leupold PRW 1" rings and QRW bases (picatinny style), that I'm going to use. I usually use Warne but thought I'd try these as they have a horizontal split in the rings for mounting and should make it a little easier, especially if I use rubber cement and have to move the scope around for positioning some.
    I was wondering if I should use locktite on all the screws (bases and rings). I have a red bottle of locktite, what is the difference between the red and blue? Also, I have heard others recommend not putting locktite on base and ring screws, not sure why not though. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • mainer_in_ak
    replied
    Ak hunter,
    Don't forget the 30mm tubed fullfields like i mentioned too. They are reasonably priced and provide a massive field of view. I have an older 1.75-5 burris fullfield on my blr. I shot a moose with it this past season and have been shooting 200-250 grain bullets through the rifle with no change of zero. I also have the 3-12 XTR. It was pricey but it's my "precision" scope for accuracy testing of handloads and also my long range scope. Your 338 is not going to knock a burris out of alignment.......but you better have some good rings that are lapped and use blue locktite on the screws.

    Leave a comment:


  • ak hunter
    replied
    TN Hillbilly,

    After droping your rifle/scope, was the zero still the same or did that drop on the concrete cause a shift?

    Leave a comment:


  • ak hunter
    replied
    I was also looking at some of the Nikon Monarch models. After having both a brand new Bushnell Elite 3200 and Leupold VX-II fail me, I began looking at Burris and Nikon, which are two other popular name brands that I have never tried before. From what I'm hearing though, the Burris Fullfield II line sounds hard to beat, especially for the price when compared to the other options (i.e. Nikon Monarch).

    I guess the fact that the Burris models have the entire eye piece rotate when you change the power would be a downside for some, but I don't use flip open lens caps, so it wouldn't be an issue for me. I'm going to stop by one of the sporting good stores this weekend and look and a Fullfield II model. I really like the fact that they use dual internal springs, and 'am hoping that this will solve my problem of prior scopes not holding a zero.

    Leave a comment:


  • marshall
    replied
    I've been looking real hard at the Nikon Monarch line with BDC for my 308. I like the idea of hold points at 100 - 500 yard ranges. There is a video link below.

    http://www.nikonhunting.com/riflesco...c-reticle.html


    Nikon offers a large range of power options to may work out for your application.

    http://www.nikonhunting.com/riflescopes-monarch.html


    Optics planet has some pretty good prices on this line.

    http://www.opticsplanet.net/nikon-mo...flescopes.html


    I personally don't have any experience with these scopes but they seem like a good bang for the buck.

    I also like the Burris scopes except the eye piece on the models I've actually held rotate as you change power settings. If you have a flip up lens cap this causes it to either be in front of your weak eye or hit the bolt. That was a bummer since the optic had a real bright and clear picture.

    Leave a comment:


  • TN_Hillbilly
    replied
    Burris Fullfield

    Get the burris. I have the Fullfield II 3x9x50 on my Ruger 338, no problems. I even dropped it off the shooting bench on a concrete pad (ouch!). Other than scratched paint on the objective bell, it is still GTG.

    Oh, and they really are water/fog proof. I haven't needed the warranty yet.

    Leave a comment:

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