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Problems Sighting In

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  • #16
    This scope is about 6 years old
    sigpic

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    • #17
      Not that old. On muzzle brakes, Accuracy Arms has a nice one. I had them replace the triggers on both my 7mm and 338, huge improvement over the originals.

      kurt

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      • #18
        I was talking with a good friend this evening and I mentioned my problems sighting in my 300RUM and Leupold VXII. He told me that he has had the same problems in a previous rifle. The problem was the scope was mounted incorrectly on the rifle.

        He said, instead of his windage screw on the scope being mounted horiztonally they were mounted vertically as if they were the up and down screws, and the same with his windage screws. Does that make sense?

        I think this is my problem with my ghost like scope. Comments?
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        • #19
          WG,

          Went to the range last friday and ran some loads through my 7mm. This is a new leopold 3x9 40 scope and it worked fine. I was thinking as I adjusted it the first time,....don't let my scope have the waterg virus..lol. Up was up, down was down and the left right was as it should be. You have a very strange thing going on. Have you put a bore sighter in it and looked at the movement? Might want to do that if you haven't. Should confirm whats going on ...or not.

          Kurt

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          • #20
            Scope problem..

            Originally posted by Water_Gremlin View Post
            I was talking with a good friend this evening and I mentioned my problems sighting in my 300RUM and Leupold VXII. He told me that he has had the same problems in a previous rifle. The problem was the scope was mounted incorrectly on the rifle.

            He said, instead of his windage screw on the scope being mounted horiztonally they were mounted vertically as if they were the up and down screws, and the same with his windage screws. Does that make sense?

            I think this is my problem with my ghost like scope. Comments?
            W/G,

            Well. Interesting. I think I ask this question back a ways, is the scope rotated 90 degrees. The Leupold cross hair is supposed to show on the left side I believe.

            I worked for three different gun shops before I moved to AK and most of my work was remounting scopes sold and "mounted for free" by the likes of the big box outlet chain outdoor stores. About half of them were mounted with the windage turret up. A few were mounted backwards! Since I've been in Fairbanks, I don't do much scoping here but through friends or friends of friends, I get some scope mounting and remounting. Since SW came to town I've remounted 8 scopes from there and five of them were mounted with the windage and elevation turrets reversed. The R/L turret goes on the side, the U/D turret goes on the top. They will work mounted that way but the R=U and the U=R, for most scopes.

            I have mounted two scopes rotated this way to allow the empty brass to eject without hitting the turret and fall back into the action. My recommendation for them was ditch the rifle but you know how some folks are.
            Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?


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            • #21
              A couple of points. Personally I think the windage adjustable bases are a poor design. If the scope mount screws are that far off on an action, a screwey base design isn't the solution.

              Second point, the scope is not to be used for torqueing the front ring into position. Not sure if this was done or not, but it certainly can damage a scope.

              Third the scope flopping around with a loose rear base will also promote damage to the scope.

              I'd recomend sending the scope to Leupold to have it checked out, they are excellent about repairs.

              I'd also go with a better ring base/design, the dual dovetail leupies are good, ie the front and rear are of the same design, the weavers and copies of weavers are good, and talley makes a neat one piece base/ring setup. To me a good design has as few parts as possible, and the talleys win in that regard.

              A properly mounted good scope should be easy to dial in. If you're having base and or scope problems, it will lead to agrivation.
              Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

              If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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