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upgrade to 375 h&h

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  • upgrade to 375 h&h

    I have a 338 win mag and was considering upgrading to the 375 h&h but I've never shot a 375 and don't know anyone who has one I can try so I was curious as to the difference in recoil. I've talked to some who prefer the recoil of the 375 over the 338 due to the 338's sharp kick compared to more of a push from a 375, I have no problems with the 338 so I figure I should be able to handle the 375. I thought maybe I could get some input from those who have shot both.............
    I once held the yardstick of anothers perfection, I threw it down and carved my own................

  • #2
    It's probably an oversimplification to call the recoil of a 375 a "push." Whatever words you choose however, there is a definite difference between my various 338's and 375's when shot side by side. The recoil of most 375's generally suits me better, so I generally choose that round to carry into the field.

    If the 338 deserves it's praise (and I certainly think so), then the 375 deserves it more when better ballistics are achieved with the better recoil characteristics. All the arguments used against 300 mags by 338 pushers can be applied to 338's by the 375 pushers. I make no bones about liking both, but will usually trade the heavier, larger diameter bullets of the 375 for the slightly better trajectories of the 338.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    • #3
      Thunder chicken if you are in Anchorage, you can shoot mine. I need to go to the range (Rabbit Crrek) this coming week end and plan on taking it to finish sighting it in. You can try it. Mine is a little light with a McMillian stock but you'll get the idea.

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      • #4
        I personally find them indistinguishable. 375's are typically about a pound heavier than 338's, which certainly tends to make them feel milder than 338's.
        Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

        If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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        • #5
          The only reason some think the 375 kicks less than a 338 is because they are talking about a heavier rifle with the 375. All things being equal; rifle weight, fit, recoil pad, etc, etc, the 375 will kick more. So you are talking a heavier rifle or more recoil. Both are easily capable of killing the biggest bear in the state. The 338 shoots a little flatter and has a wider selection of bullets. Chosing the right bullet for the job will have more effect on results that caliber choice.

          Are you willing to carry a heavier gun or spend extra money on recoil abatement? Remember that both guns kick a lot for prone shots. And prone is the position that I've used for most of my big game shooting.

          As great as the 375 is, I don't think it gets any better than the 338 as an all around gun for AK. Just my 2c worth.

          Slim

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          • #6
            Brownbear said it perfectly. I also own both but usually carry my 375H&H on most of my hunts.

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            • #7
              Go for it!

              Got both, shoot both, love both. If .338 doesnt bother you, .375 probably will not either. That being said, the design/weight of the rifle has a lot more to do with felt recoil than caliber (with in limits). My light weight .270 with a metal butt plate is a vicious kicker, far worse than my big bores.
              Dave

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              • #8
                Shooting a 375

                I have a 375 you can shoot if your ever in Fairbanks

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                • #9
                  You will love the 375 and if you shoot a 338 you will have no problems whatsoever, I enjoy going out and shooting mine as often as possible.

                  Doug
                  http://www.alaskasgreatoutdoors.com

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                  • #10
                    I wouldn't call the recoil on a 375 a push, i've put about 15 rounds through mine and that was a little more than I could really tolerate at the range. I've never shot a 338 so I can't compare the 2 but the 375 does have a nice kick to it nonetheless!

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                    • #11
                      Get a recoil pad to your 375,with the Limbsaver pad it almost feels like a 30-06
                      And practice practice practice,its the best way to get used to the recoil

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                      • #12
                        You can also add a mercury recoil reducer as well, they really make a difference.

                        svehunter is correct about the difference with the recoil pad, when I shoot mine for practice and play I can put a box or more through it and would really have no problems shooting more through it at the end of the day. I have both a limbsaver pad and a recoil reducer on my 375.

                        Doug
                        http://www.alaskasgreatoutdoors.com

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                        • #13
                          I hunted with the Ruger 77 in .338 for years, switched to the Model 70 in. 375 H&H last year and won't go back. Very little heavier, and actually nicer to shoot. The "feel" of the recoil is quite different, and to me the .375 is much less jarring.

                          My better half concurs - she hated the .338, loves the .375.

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                          • #14
                            Say WHAT?????

                            Man, I tell you what. I can shoot my .338 win mag all day at the range and be fine. 50 rounds is no problem, and then I'll shoot whatever else I happend to bring with me.

                            I shot my .375 on Saturday, and I torched off TWO ROUNDS before I gave it up! Now, the caveat here is that my 338 is nearly 11 pounds, and the .375 is 7 lbs 2 ozs. Rifle weight makes a gigantic difference in felt recoil.

                            That being said, I'd worry less about caliber and more about the rifle. Both the .338 and the .375 are more than capable of doing it all in Alaska. I bought the 375 simply because of it's size and weight. However, it does occur to me that a Kimber Montana in .308 would likely do the same (save for the big bears) without the ferocious recoil!

                            I am going to put a mercury reducer in the .375 and see if I can get it under control.

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                            • #15
                              5'8" 160# to me the .375 is a push. My german made .300 weatherby is a kick. I can shoot two or three boxes of .375 at one sitting without it bothering me.
                              goldbelt

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