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Anybody seen the new Savage AK GUIDE?

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  • Anybody seen the new Savage AK GUIDE?

    I guess VF grace got savage to make a special run of 375's. They are laser engraved ALASKA GUIDE on the bolt. They are 20 inch barrels, stainless, synthetic stock, open sights, with scope holes, total weight, 6 1/2lbs! They didnt have the accu trigger, but, the trigger felt very good. Crisp and probably around 4-5 lbs. Supposedley they are like that as savage "refined" these rifles some.
    The price at Mt. View Sports was 599.00

  • #2
    Seen One!!!

    These rifles are so super secret that I OWN one and I can't even see it!! I picked mine up at Boondocks at the Sportsman Show and as of a week ago they still were not it.
    Unfortunatley, I don't know much more about it than you do. I do have a feeling that it is going to replace my $330 Savage 338 as my all-arounder. I paid about $550 for the .375, I think.
    It's a sweet rifle, the first big bore I've examined that was really fit for Alaska and not Africa.

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    • #3
      I checked their web site but couldn't find it. I have a Remmy stainless/synthetic .358 STA on the way, and a stainless Remmy safari in .458. I expect they will both be fit for AK.

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      • #4
        Savage 375 Guide Gun

        I've seen and handled the Savage Alaskan Guide. Savage is a decent gun, but as far as 375s go, it is bottom line. Cheap solid no floorplate tupperware stock, standard Savage 110 action. It just doesn't feel "right' to me. Rather put out a couple hundred more and get a good used Rem or Win. Basically it is a cheap gun.

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        • #5
          I just picked one of these up today. Stainless 375s are getting hard to come by. For 500 bucks i think they will make a great boat gun especially wieghing 6.5 pounds. Never have got into remingtons and considering it would cost you about a 1000 more dollars for a stainless winchester now i would look at these. The action needs to be slicked up but other than that i need a scope now..

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          • #6
            Good boat gun

            I think that is what I need. My Marlin is not stainless and after 10 years of boat trips well, My 15 year old is licking his lips for a chance at it, So I may be in the market for an Inexpensive replacement in Stainless. In all the years of having the Marlin, I shot it 2 times at game. Once when a nice Bull Caribou came walkng past camp at 50 yds and it was the closest and most handy gun. The next time I used it to finish off my sons Brown bear last season. He was Fatal from my sons shot, but the bear didn't know he was dead until I flatened him with the 375 ouch and ouch.. This gun would be used the same way.. Just around for backup.. I would like to look at this gun.. where can a guy find a picture of one?
            When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

            Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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            • #7
              Rem XCR vs. Savage

              Just depends what you are looking for in a rifle. I wanted a stainless, synthetic rifle with sights and a short barrel. I already have a big long big bore w/o sights. I was looking for a short, handy rifle. The only thing it lacks is suitable preparation for a scout-style mount. I am not sure if I am going to remedy that situation or not. The only alternative I was considering was the Steyr Scout, and I blew my opportunity to pick one up for $700 about two years ago. Still kicking myself over that. Even though cash isn't an issue for me, I have no problem taking my savings from the Savage and spending it on av gas.

              I'm not into calibers nearly as much as I am into rifles. It occurs to me that we already have plenty of capable calibers. Unfortunately, what we lack is a suitable battery of rifles to shoot them with. I chose this rifle for it's preexisting arrangment.

              I can live with the cheap stock and the cheesy action. After shooting my K31 everything seems cheesy.

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              • #8
                Savage .375 H&H Alaskan

                I can now declare… I have held the cheapest made yet most overpriced .375 H&H I have ever touched on the new rifle racks.

                I can not possibly see the justification to possessing one of these “new” Savage Alaska Guide Models. It is a clearly evident cash-in-on pattern of inferiority based from past successful sales like Great Northern Guns different series of .375 H&H Stainless Winchester Model 70s (that were outstanding quality) or Colt’s Kodiak .44 mags (superb quality) or S&W “Alaska Backpacker” guns (again of excellent quality)… and so on.

                Now - I am not knocking Savage as bad as some might think. They have a first-rate reputation and long history as a company; have clear-cut status for producing barrels of very good accuracy, but by and large the actions on there bolt guns remain an ongoing missing link. While Okay just fine on a varmint or paper punchin’ gun the Savage in whatever action based on the 110 is not a good bet-your-life-on-it bolt gun. I say this based on the .375 H&H rifle in particular for heavy dangerous game and for the Savage Bolt guns tackling the two legged tactical needs.

                Finally if you look at these Alaska Guide Savages… one must wonder – hmmmm? No Accutrigger??? Is this Accutriggering in reality presently a lawyer devise and not all that grand? I say yep! Just maybe it is not dependable enough for dirty, wet, and icy Alaska conditions??? So they chose not to use it? Or is putting the Accutrigger on this Alaska Model cutting into the potential profits of what is if truth be told a Stevens rank gun in Stainless… a blued Stevens would run ya $260 --- add stainless if they made it maybe $375 (there’s a ring to that price) but not $589-$689 retail on shelves now. Heck the Remington XCR .375 H&H is 100 bucks more at most retail with every feature better all the way around!!! Better yet bang for buck would be Tikka T3 in .338 at $599 w/ accuracy guarantee!!!

                Having the hole left behind on Winchester's discontinued Model 70 .375 H&H, there are those with anticipation that will gather to get hold of the “new” Savage .375 H&H --- Hopefully with any common sense when they get there they see its poor standard (inferiority) --- even the stock was lightly constructed spaghetti --- and get something more rightfully Alaskan.

                Brian Richardson
                http://www.northernrim.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Remington vs Savage

                  I'll take the Savage. I know guys who abuse the heck out of them and they keep working.

                  When I was in the business, I had 1 out of every 10 Remingtons come back with a problem. Never had that problem with Savages.

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                  • #10
                    Stevens

                    Brian,
                    It's interesting that you mention it basically being a Stevens. As far as I can tell, there isn't much difference between a Stevens and a Savage.

                    The advantage the Savage has over the Rems or Winchesters is 1) 20 in bbl 2) iron sights. for $100 or $200 more, I might have picked up a used stainless synthetic big bore in a different brand, presuming I could have found one. Then I could get the barrel cut down, sights added, shipped to an FFL in AK, blah blah blah and after a few hundred bucks at a dealer/gunsmith I'd be $400 or $500 ahead of the Savage and have a $1,000 rifle that I leave out in the rain overnight.

                    Some people love 'em, some people hate 'em.

                    I used to hunt with on old guy that carried a .30-30 lever gun. He bought a new box of ammo every 15 years or so. Killed whitetails, mulies, pronghorns, and moose with it. He went on a guided moose hunt hunt in Canada with his two boys. His guide laughed when he saw his rifle and his two cartridges (just in case!) for the whole hunt. You guessed it, he returned home with one dead moose and a spare cartridge! Funny how that works.

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                    • #11
                      I'm with Brian. For about the same money you can get a Ruger all weather 338 mag w/ irons. Yes the barrel is 24", and it's "only" a 338. But I'd rather have a good 338 than a mediocre 375. You could always have the barrel cut down and sight re-attched, but I don't know of any reasonably priced smiths in Anchorage, a bob job shouldn't cost more than $100.
                      Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                      If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ruger vs Savage

                        Like I said earlier I would go afield with a Savage before I would take a Remington. However my first choice for the last twenty years has been Ruger as far as bolt guns go. I just ordered a 350 Rem mag in 77 all weather for just over $500. I'd say Paul H hit the nail on the head as I would never ever pay more for a Savage than a Ruger. However I am what I am and if I had my mind set on a 375 H&H then I may spend $550 on the Savage and have a stainless gun rather than $1200 for a glossy blue, high grade walnut Ruger safari that I was afraid to scratch!

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                        • #13
                          Ok, but who's shot one? 6.5 pounds. 20 inch barrel. .375. I'm thinking thumper and bunch of muzzle blast.

                          My long .338 T3 is the same weight and it's stiff. This rifle can't be a joy to shoot.
                          -Tim

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                          • #14
                            genuinely wish you the best w/ it...

                            Defensive posturing that focuses on praiseworthiness of the Savage 110 and its near clones is truly a bit amusing. <echo> Is truly a bit amusing! Is truly a bit amusing!!!

                            Let’s face it guys…

                            The quote - “I’d go afield w/ a Savage bolt gun before I’d take a Remington bolt gun”

                            Guidance… The vast mainstream of rifleman, gunsmiths… including military & law enforcement differ in conclusions and sure-fire results.

                            The quote – “The advantage the Savage has over the Rems or Winchesters is 1) 20 in bbl 2) iron sights. for $100 or $200 more, I might have picked up a used stainless synthetic big bore in a different brand, presuming I could have found one.”

                            Qualification - There are no advantages… 1) You might like an 18 ½”, 20” or 22” tube so cut/crown is always an option for $100. Some folks might want a muzzle break or porting. 2) All of my .375 H&H rifles came w/ iron sights on heavier contoured bbl. Rem. Custom KS to my Win 70s --- (plus + the new lighter weight 700 XCR has them as well!) My .375 H&H guns include better-quality irons by any visualization & overall desirability than the teddy-bear toy sights on the Savage Alaska Guide Model. Moreover, all the factory stocks are excellent to pretty darn good on my .375 H&H guns vs. a flexi-noodle on the Savage Alaskan. Hmmm? Almost certainly why I find quite a collection of cheap Indian head stock caps at the range having fallen off the Savage rimfire and centerfire bolt guns.

                            Is it any marvel you may well not find a used stainless synthetic .375 from Remington or Winchester??? At least not very often??? Do the Math and it sums up the dialogue. They are continually worth the $$$ and high-quality enough for folks to hold onto.

                            Again I am not bashing Savage on the whole… they have their place in the rifle world, and I specified their niche, reputation, American tradition, and so on. It is also personal opinion and experience from shooting Savage varminters of very good out of the box accuracy and adverse growing pain tribulations as Savage bolt guns move up to heavier hitting calibers of safari ranking. All I am relating is that this “Alaska Guide Model” will fill a hole (not shoes however) on Winchester M70 .375 H&H stocking dealers shelves, and that gun is not anything too exceptional (in fact rather poor standards when it comes to .375 H&H class guns). At its asking price, it is not in the neighborhood representative of the celebrated Savage value nor does it include newer Savage accompaniments. My assessment is that there are more/better/other bang for the buck out there at this price.

                            Am I saying it won’t shoot, fall apart becoming an instant antique, and fail in the field? NO not really! Any rifle design can have an Achilles heel. Much of that tho’ can be attributed to the hands of mindless neglectful abusers of their rifles. Is a 600 dollar rifle a paddle, boat ballast, sledge, pry-bar, crutch, or caber toss? Hopefully not! Should hunting, or personal defense, or survival guns be predestined for negligent thrashing? Key word is predestined and I would trust not! That’s carelessness with deadly equipment, reckless notion, to add irresponsible for shooter and certainly towards living breathing targets.

                            Do I deem/doom the gun to be inaccurate?
                            No – no reason to believe whatsoever… I think it may be quite capable of realistic precision in proficient hands.

                            Do I still consider that it’s a cheaply made, not up to industry quality, and a compromise gun at too high an asking price tag for what it is very basically worth?
                            Yes!!! It is obviously inexpensively manufactured… having inferior features, functioning, and quality throughout. Furthermore it eclipses Savage’s traditional easy on the pocket category by quite a margin.

                            If you have purchased one --- I genuinely wish you the best w/ it. May it serve you dependably with pride, be well cared for (not aimlessly ill-treated), and handed down some day to hunter progeny.

                            Brian Richardson
                            http://www.northernrim.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ahhh yes Brian..

                              Once again you are the voice of wit and reason, my friend! I would agree with you. Thanks for posting on this one.


                              Frank
                              Proud to be an American!

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