Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pistol bullets in rifle cases?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pistol bullets in rifle cases?

    I have quite the ground hog(woodchuck) problem in my timber here in Iowa. I have plenty of varmint guns that are up to the task but they always get all of the attention. I was thinking about winding some 110 grain 357 hollow points up tight in my 358 Winchester and exploding some ground hogs. Might even try some 180XTPs in my 444 Marlin. Have any of you guys played with hot rodding pistol bullets in a rifle? 3 MOA accuracy would be good enough for what I want to do!

  • #2
    Yes, absolutely. I ran some 158 gr semi-wadcutters in my 35 whelen. I used Trailboss, and filled the case to the neck sans any printed data, but following articles I scoured over by googling. I seem to remember some data for .358 dia bullets in 35 cal rifles, but I'm not near my books to verify. I do know that it can be done, and is not particularly uncommon.

    My accuracy wasn't awesome. I personally got 2" groups at 50 yards, which of course is 4 MOA more or less. I really didn't try too hard to dial them in, or size the lead properly for the barrel. I probably would have done better with the jacketed rounds you're looking at.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
      I have quite the ground hog(woodchuck) problem in my timber here in Iowa. I have plenty of varmint guns that are up to the task but they always get all of the attention. I was thinking about winding some 110 grain 357 hollow points up tight in my 358 Winchester and exploding some ground hogs. Might even try some 180XTPs in my 444 Marlin. Have any of you guys played with hot rodding pistol bullets in a rifle? 3 MOA accuracy would be good enough for what I want to do!
      I have a marlin in 357 mag. I loaded Hornady 125 gn XTPs with a Max load of H110. Book says a little over 2100fps. I never chronoed it. They shot about 2inch groups at 100yards, smoke rabbits and other rodents! Great load!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
        ...hot rodding pistol bullets in a rifle....
        Oh yeah. You've landed on the right calibers for doing it too, specifically 35 caliber. The 444 is a good one,but already shooting "pistol" bullets so the gains aren't quite so impressive. Been doing it for years in both 35 Remington and 358 Win, as well as loading some for a bud's Whelen. My 44 cal wildcat based on the 45-70 case kinda takes 44 cal 180 grain bullets to the next level over what a 444 will do with them.

        Not an issue in 44 cal (except my wildcat with 180's), but watch out for going TOO FAST with 110's and 125's in your 358. There's a point (approaching 3k fps) when you just overwhelm the combo of thin jackets and lots of exposed lead at the nose. You'll know it when you start seeing blue streaks in the air between you and the target and you no longer get any holes in your target. The bullets just start coming apart in the air. No harm to the gun, but kinda futile for hitting anything. :whistle: My goal back in those days was to get as close as possible to blue streaks while still managing to hit varmints. Kinda impressive and colorful when you pull it together, if you know what I mean.

        I'm not near my reloading manuals to get specific, but in years past one or more of them had loads for pistol bullets in 35 cal cases. That's all I went by in developing loads. I confess to nudging 110's over book max in 358 because in my assessment the book stopped well below pressure max in favor of holding bullets together. If you don't find pistol bullet loads in your current manuals, dust off some old ones.

        Only
        "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
        Merle Haggard

        Comment


        • #5
          I tried some 158gr jacketed pistol bullets in my 358 Norma and found it real easy to get way beyond what the bullet will stand. I gave up pretty quick as I have better rifles for varmit shooting.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rbuck351 View Post
            I tried some 158gr jacketed pistol bullets in my 358 Norma and found it real easy to get way beyond what the bullet will stand. I gave up pretty quick as I have better rifles for varmit shooting.
            Were they going of mid flight, just not accurate or what? I would imagine that your norma mag would get em down the pipe in a hurry.

            I am not trying to reinvent the wheel, it's just that my 358 Winchester never gets shot and I'm itching to kill something with it. Groundhogs are what comes up next. I really don't care if I blow em clear in half...sorta hoping that I do. The bigger the kerwhop after the boom the better my morbid sense of humor gets entertained. ha!

            Comment


            • #7
              Never did get real serious with testing but they will come apart if pushed fast enough just running into air. The things I try when I get bored surprise myself. I would think they would work well at 2500fps and maybe more and really tear up a ground hog.

              Comment


              • #8
                EKC:
                I'd be interested in knowing how accurate these pistol bullets will be at rifle distances, and at velocities, and perhaps at twists much faster than they were designed for.

                I've only considered them for reduced loads.

                Please pass along anything you learn

                Smitty of the North
                Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
                Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
                You can't out-give God.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rbuck351 View Post
                  I would think they would work well at 2500fps and maybe more....
                  It depends a little on the brand, but you're pretty close to right on. Sierras go to blue streak heaven when you get much over the 2500 you named, while Hornady can run a little higher. If I was looking for max vel along with reliably holing a target, I'd devote most of my effort to Speer. I've pushed the 180 grain .429's to a little over 2800 from my 44 cal wildcat based on the 45-70 case and still managed to get holes in the target. Accuracy was surprisingly good. I kinda chickened out at that point, so I don't actually know how high I could push them.

                  But one thing really pops it's head. Trajectory falls off fast when you get much past 100 yards, telling me that they lose velocity FAST due to the blunt noses. When sniping at smaller targets I'd call them 100 yard loads despite the higher vels, which is still a pretty darned good thing.
                  "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                  Merle Haggard

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I load the 110 xtps sub sonic with trailboss for a super light recoiling load and it shoots 1.5-2Ē groups at 100 yards....just 12Ē or so inches lower than my big game hunting load with the same sight in. Itís a lot of fun and 100 bullets doesnít even cost $20 so itís pretty economical if looking for a fun plinker.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey EKC, what's those critters say about winter, another 6 weeks? I am ready for spring and got a new AR in 6.5 Creed to ring out.

                      I think the .35 caliber is the perfect one to use pistol bullets in. I have not given up on my dream of having a Marlin 336 turned into some flavor of a .35 caliber wildcat putting out .358 Win. ballistics. If I ever get it I will be looking for low velocity cast bullet loads and medium velocity heavy jacketed pistol bullet loads for practice.

                      I think some kind of a jacked up .35 caliber lever gun load is one of the few remaining viable cartidges that should be made factory available in the Marlin 336. It could be a serious 300 yard big critter hunting set up. I want it in a tube fed lever gun with an exposed hammer, hence the Marlin 336 and I want it stamped made in America and called the .35 Marlin Alaskan.

                      The .358 Winny is a good one and should have enough of "the right stuff" to put those Iowa ground hogs down! People don't realize how dangerous they are, they're just waking up, dangerously grouchy and hungry and they be a coming for ya!

                      Years ago I watched a couple of guys hunting them in the woods with a pellet gun on a TV show. After the head shot they skinned it and ate it in some kind of an Iowa version of Mex/Tex chili. It looked good and of course they said it was. They said it tastes like rabbit and squirrel, can't believe they left out chicken. You ever eat one? Probably not to interesting with all that Iowa beef and deer running around. I haven't ate an Alaskan bunny in years and can't even remember what a real Iowa squirrel tastes like.

                      P.S. I expect the Boyd's stock to show up this week and the grandson is loading up 338-06 loads with the stuff you kindly provided. I told him he has to send you some thing to chow on when he gets that first moose with his 338-06!

                      Comment

                      Footer Adsense

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X