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That One Gun You Passed On, And Now Regret

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  • That One Gun You Passed On, And Now Regret

    What was that one gun you saw, looked at, liked, but then passed on and now you look back on and wish you had bought it. Mine was a pre-64 Winchester Model 70 in 7x57 mauser with the most beautiful walnut stock I had ever seen. That rifle was also in 95% condition. Just curious to see if anybody had "that one that got away" like I had.

  • #2
    There are a few guns that I still wonder about like a Model 88 Winchester in .308. I bought some guns from my great uncle before he passed that added a lot to my collection like a 1948 Model 70, and a Model 1895 Winchester in .405. My greatest regrets have involved average quality guns like some old Rugers that I carried a lot and used for hunting. I sold a Model 77, a SBH, and a single six when the collection was upgraded. I could remember all the times I took a spill by looking at the stock on the rifle. As I get older, I value the old saddle in the corner, the wood and canvas canoe out back, canvas Duluth packs and the old wall tent. I wish I still had some of those old guns just to remember working in the field in the big mountains.

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    • #3
      None that I could have legally kept, anyway.

      I once had a chance at a full-auto M16A1 lower, for free, but passed. I probably would have gotten away with it, but I probably would have gotten caught, too. LOL

      Besides, what would I do with a full auto M16?

      I more regret guns I sold than guns not bought.

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      • #4
        There was a Savage 24, 12ga./.223 here in town a few years ago that I passed on, haven't been able to find one since and I would love to get my hands on one!

        Also passed on a Remington model 7? In .308 that would have made a nice cheap mountain gun for me, silly to pass on that too.


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Only 1? Top of the list would be a LH Kimber 22LR SuperAmerica at their (Kimber of Oregon) final auction. Must have been one of their display guns. It was really nice!! and I think it sold below its value. It had not been on display for inspection prior to the auction and may not have been a "working" gun. At the same auction I tried to talk the Wife into buying herself a great 7X57, no luck. If I'd had the $ I'd filled the truck.

          When I was just getting my life going again a sporting goods store was getting ready to close. They had a Ruger .357 MAX at a give away price. I passed and put the $ on my bills instead.

          SWH had a S&W 357 (41 mag) that I passed on.

          I better stop...I'm feeling ill.

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          • #6
            For me, it was a 660 6mm Rem back in early 1970.I already had a "new" 660 243 that as an innocent gun buyer I had purchased from a "gun shop" that someone had messed with the trigger/sear and would drop the sear when the safety was released.

            Back THEN, I was VERY inexperienced.The 6MM was perfect, but the new dealer would only "give "me $85 for the 243 against the "fair trade" (remember those days?) price of $129.95 for the 6MM.As a grad student at Cornell, $45 was big bank LOL.

            So I passed on the 6mm...still in the never never land then of thinking I could hunt chucks and deer year round with JUST one rifle.Only needed one rifle...a combo do everything rig.

            100 guns later...and probably $100K+ "poorer",I always wonder whether I might have lived a very different life if I'd just bought that 6mm and just 'ignored" guns and shooting and reloading for the past 44+ years!!

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            • #7
              My biggest regret was having to pass on my dad's Colt SAA in 45, his duty gun while working in the 1950's as a deputy sheriff in the Southwest. He wanted to peddle it, and as a young man with too big a young family and too many bills, I simply couldn't come up with the $125 he sold it for. At least he gave me first shot at it, but sadly I had to turn him down. Years later I inherited his belt and holster, but it's just not the same without that memory-laden 45 in it.
              "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
              Merle Haggard

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              • #8
                I had the opportunity to buy a WW II Colt .45 1911 for $250. I was a poor SSgt at the time and didn't have the money so let it go.

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                • #9
                  Three I can think of, no, make that four.

                  9X56 Mannlicher Schoenauer, came across it in a pawn shop years ago, complete with dies, brass and component bullets. The down sides were the stock was cracked in the grip, the action had been swiss cheesed by a "gunsmith" to mount a scope and it was IMHO overpriced given the condition, but man what a neat gun and one you won't come across that often, something I didn't appreciate at the time.

                  .243 Mannlicher Schoenauer, at the time I had a very low regard for the .243 and my kids were too young for their first rifle, but for $250 I should haven't had deliberated for a second.

                  Winchester mdl '94 30-30. Just before the prices started to skyrocket I came across one with some saddle rash but a pristine bore. I hesitated, came back the next day and it was gone.

                  Freedom Arms mdl 83 Alaska Master Guide Series 454. This was a limited run of 25 done for GNG. 5 1/2" barrel, MNP, roundbutted green packawood grips. One of the finest and most accurate revolvers I've ever fired and most importantly I could fire the gun to it's potential. Unfortunately I didn't have the $1100 to take it home (quite reasonable price for the gun), and that was that.

                  Lesson learned, you need to keep some coin on hand for those really cool once or twice in a lifetime finds, and if you hesitate for a great deal it'll be gone before you make up your mind.
                  Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                  If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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                  • #10
                    In the early '80s I had a chance to buy a 6" blue Colt Python, secondhand but new in the box, for $400. Bad enough, right . . . but it was serial #1011. The owner said it was the first one to ever reach St. Louis, and probably made in the first month of production. Not sure how many thousands of dollars it would be worth now.

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                    • #11
                      Just ONE gun? I can think of way too many. A cherry Sig AMT 308 semi auto for 1200.00 bucks comes to mind. I only bought ONE Browning M-2 machine gun for 7k, should have bought all 8 that were for sale at the time.....25k a piece these days. Oh well....
                      "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paul H View Post
                        ...you need to keep some coin on hand for those really cool once or twice in a lifetime finds, and if you hesitate for a great deal it'll be gone before you make up your mind.
                        Those might be the wisest words printed on this website this year.

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                        • #13
                          I think you may be right.

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                          • #14
                            Paul, my heart palpitates over the FA Casull.I once also passed on a sweetheart Premier that didn't even have score marks on the chamber throats.Absolutely mint for probably under a grand.

                            Just didn't have the dough then...a story frequently told.

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                            • #15
                              The thing is I'm not even a fan of the Casull and when I get a mdl 83 it'll be a 480/475. But that particular gun was perfect, and I could always send it to the factory to have a 45 colt cylinder fit.

                              I did get my wife one of these:



                              And while not as nice as that mdl 83, it's not a bad gun for 1/3 the price.
                              Last edited by Paul H; 10-27-2014, 14:58.
                              Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                              If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

                              Comment

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