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  • Whats your thoughts?

    I'm looking at reloading some .300 win mag here in the future and I am wondering will it make a difference in shooting if I load Nosler AccuBond bullets inside a Federal or Remington brass even though they will be the same 308 diameter? Please let me know what you think!

  • #2
    It should not make much of a difference on what brass that you are using. I mix brass and have no issues for practice ammo. Some brass tends to be better then other brass and one may want to 'sort' the brass for load development. For hunting ammo, I only use 'new' brass, all of the same brand. About the only place one would have an issue is when you are using military brass, as it tends to be a little thicker in the web area. One needs to start with less powder and work up from there.

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    • #3
      With milder loads, mixing rifle brass probably won't hurt. If you're trying for max vels, I'd watch your backside.

      Outside dimensions of brass are basically the same from brand to brand, but if you weigh the various brands some are heavier and some are lighter.

      Howcum?

      Because some brands are thinner and some are thicker. That means there is more or less case capacity between brands. And when you start getting up near max, that matters a whole lot. Can't tell you how many times in the last 50 years of reloading I've screwed up and moved from one brand of brass to another without starting about 5% lower than my proven charge, then working back up. Blown primers, stuck cases, split cases, you name it. Stupid I am. But I'm learning. Sloooooowly.....

      Specific to Federal and Remington, I'd weigh a few of each and compare. I'm betting the Fed is heavier, but that's more of a guess than fact, because I haven't compared the two brands in 300 WM. But the heavier cases are going to give higher pressures, and that's just the way it is. If you have worked up to your max load with the lighter cases, then drop the same charge into your heavier cases, be sure and bone up on your rifle rescue techniques. You probably won't blow up your rifle, but you could well get a face full of high pressure hot gases if you pierce a primer or split a case. You could also stick a case in your rifle. Know how to open the bolt with a stuck case????? Know how to remove a stuck case from the chamber when the extractor jumps the rim????? Know how to remove half a case from the chamber if the extractor holds on, but rips off the head of a stuck case?????

      Like I said, watchyerbackside.
      "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
      Merle Haggard

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      • #4
        I've loaded ABs into about any common brass you can think of...works just fine.

        As BB mentioned- when mixing and matching brass it makes good sense to stay out of max load territory due to internal differences in dimensions.
        It also makes sense to load into matching brands of brass as a "batch" and that lets you track how many loadings that particular batch has seen.
        "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hodgeman View Post
          It also makes sense to load into matching brands of brass as a "batch" and that lets you track how many loadings that particular batch has seen.
          Excellent point! I keep my cases in batches and carefully track how many reloads in each. Cases have a definite "life" before they start failing, but it's danged hard to tell much about them just by looking at them. If you have newer cases mixed with older ones and the older ones start to fail, you'll end up dumping the whole bunch simply because you can't tell the new from the old. Working in batches also helps you keep track of things like case trimming. If you have all ages mixed, you'll end up measuring cases every stinking time you reload simply because some of them are going to be too long.
          "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
          Merle Haggard

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          • #6
            Awesome! Thanks for all the information guys!

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