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Another hornday interlock failure

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  • Another hornday interlock failure

    been processing a moose that my friend shot. One bullet, clipped the very tip of the front quarter. The bullet was a 225 grain inter-lock fired from a 338 ruger compact magnum. The bullet made it all of 11 inches into the animal, peeled all the way back to the base, and grenaded all through the front quarter. The bloodshot meat was substantial, the wound was shallow. Cow moose ran 100 yds, and finally bled out, because the shock damage the main veins running up the neck. I had to take a break from cutting, it had me a bit disgusted at the meat loss. Pictures to follow.
    www.freightercanoes.com

  • #2
    Wow, I have nothing but stellar performance from those bullets when hitting moose or caribou with them, even at 27 paces into a bull moose from my .338WM.

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    • #3
      The interlock is not a bonded boolit. You have to go to the Interbond and they function pretty good, but with the price jump to the bonded bullet, I have been running with the Barnes TTSX. The barnes seem to be a little more accurate in my rifles too. I used to only shoot interlocks for everything.

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      • #4
        I had a 375 (270gr) interlock explode after only a few inches of penetration in a Brown Bear. The more recent examples seem to be a bit brittle.
        Float-CFI, Photo Guide, Fishing Guide, Remote Kayaking
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        • #5
          Do you believe quality has suffered due to the recent buying frenzy?
          "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

          Edwin Hubble

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          • #6
            And 1,2,3....

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Float Pilot View Post
              I had a 375 (270gr) interlock explode after only a few inches of penetration in a Brown Bear. The more recent examples seem to be a bit brittle.
              Originally posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
              Do you believe quality has suffered due to the recent buying frenzy?
              This I had not considered. My current supply is several years old, and the last time I put one into an animal was several years ago from a prior lot(Nosler Partitions served duty since). Perhaps there is something to the theory(s).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
                Do you believe quality has suffered due to the recent buying frenzy?
                The Interlock has a reputation for over expansion and soft construction well back into the 90's. Boddington even mentions it in "Safari Rifles" published in 1991...I don't think the current market has anything to do with it.

                I shot a fox at 20 yards with one several years ago and didn't get an exit...I stopped using them right then. That was a shame since that particular .308 would stack them one on another at 100yds.
                "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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                • #9
                  Not to create an argument here but why would you (anyone) shoot anything that you plan to eat that is not a dangerous animal in the shoulder. I have killed a lot of big game over the years and have always put it throe the lungs and only had then walk a few yards at best before dropping. The other location for a vital kill would be in the neck with a minimal amount of meat loss.
                  Poor shooting or shot placement is another matter.
                  sigpic
                  Sweepint
                  Wasilla,
                  '' Livn' The Dream ''
                  26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hodgeman View Post
                    The Interlock has a reputation for over expansion and soft construction well back into the 90's. Boddington even mentions it in "Safari Rifles" published in 1991...I don't think the current market has anything to do with it.

                    I shot a fox at 20 yards with one several years ago and didn't get an exit...I stopped using them right then. That was a shame since that particular .308 would stack them one on another at 100yds.
                    Most standard cup n core style bullets separate. Are these hornady interlocks any different? I shot them and have for years. Sierra's do the same and so do nosler ballistic tips. I would expect those with a higher sectional density should hold up better. I just bought 200, 220's for my 06 for the fall.
                    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

                    Edwin Hubble

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
                      Most standard cup n core style bullets separate. Are these hornady interlocks any different? I shot them and have for years. Sierra's do the same and so do nosler ballistic tips. I would expect those with a higher sectional density should hold up better. I just bought 200, 220's for my 06 for the fall.
                      This is a good conversation... and important to consider.

                      IMHO Hornady Interlocks are fairly soft- even compared to Speers or Sierras. Sectional Density is a function of weight and bore diameter and (in general) higher sectional density penetrates better all other things being equal.

                      But all other things are seldom equal- jacket separation/bullet blow up is a function of bullet construction, material composition and jacket thickness- a high sectional density bullet will still blow up if made from softer material or thinner jackets- even at moderate impact speed. Woodleigh and A-Square both make some very stout "cup and core" bullets with thick jackets and harder alloys that won't come apart even at higher than normal impact speeds.

                      Ballistic tips are very soft too- designed to open violently in thin skinned animals like deer or varmints (they make them for both). Few people hunt moose or bear with ballistic tips since you typically want more penetration on those animals.

                      The 220gr '06 bullets by virtue of weight have lower MVs and a lower impact speed- and tend to hold together. That same bullet in a .300WBY is a grenade just looking for a place to go off however regardless of sectional density.

                      In today's market the monolithic bullets (TSX, ETIP, GMX) and the bonded bullets (Accubond, Interbond, Weldcore) are generally better choices for game bigger than deer because they tend to expand fairly well and hold together to get good penetration even at magnum impact speeds. I've been a fan of the Accubond for a long time and have never recovered a bullet- just big, bloody exit wounds and dead animals.
                      "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Float Pilot View Post
                        The more recent examples seem to be a bit brittle.
                        I've been wondering about that, based upon all these reports in recent times. I have a whole bunch of older stock in half a dozen calibers that I've been using for years with complete satisfaction.... Provided I don't push them too fast.
                        "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                        Merle Haggard

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by hodgeman View Post
                          This is a good conversation... and important to consider.

                          IMHO Hornady Interlocks are fairly soft- even compared to Speers or Sierras. Sectional Density is a function of weight and bore diameter and (in general) higher sectional density penetrates better all other things being equal.

                          But all other things are seldom equal- jacket separation/bullet blow up is a function of bullet construction, material composition and jacket thickness- a high sectional density bullet will still blow up if made from softer material or thinner jackets- even at moderate impact speed. Woodleigh and A-Square both make some very stout "cup and core" bullets with thick jackets and harder alloys that won't come apart even at higher than normal impact speeds.

                          Ballistic tips are very soft too- designed to open violently in thin skinned animals like deer or varmints (they make them for both). Few people hunt moose or bear with ballistic tips since you typically want more penetration on those animals.

                          The 220gr '06 bullets by virtue of weight have lower MVs and a lower impact speed- and tend to hold together. That same bullet in a .300WBY is a grenade just looking for a place to go off however regardless of sectional density.

                          In today's market the monolithic bullets (TSX, ETIP, GMX) and the bonded bullets (Accubond, Interbond, Weldcore) are generally better choices for game bigger than deer because they tend to expand fairly well and hold together to get good penetration even at magnum impact speeds. I've been a fan of the Accubond for a long time and have never recovered a bullet- just big, bloody exit wounds and dead animals.
                          Based upon these assumptions then, if you had 300 rounds of 270 and 300 grain hornady interlocks for your 375 h&h mag, would you feel comfortable in the interior moose hunt?

                          See when I first loaded them, almost all had positive reviews on the interlocks, even in thicker skin African game. Most of my experience comes from 30 caliber at speeds lower then 3100 fps.
                          "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

                          Edwin Hubble

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                          • #14
                            Interlock are junk.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by northwoods View Post
                              Interlock are junk.
                              http://www.africahunting.com/threads...pe-hunt.16518/

                              i just oust came across this thread on the Africa hunting forums regarding the same thing

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