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  • Marlin Cross Bolt Safety

    I have owned 4 Marlin 1895's in 45-70 Govt. For some stupid reason I did not keep the first one with the very good looking wood stock. I have 2 now and both of them came with the "cross bolt safety" and I had both of them disabled and they now fit flush with the receiver. Years ago when I first took one to the range I managed to unknowingly bump the safety on and the hammer dropped on the cross bolt when I pressed the trigger. On my way home I stopped by the gun smith's place and he told me he could disable it and fit it flush to the receiver. I had him do the same thing to the long octagon barreled one before I ever went to the range. The other night I read a hunting story and this guy cycled the action and dropped the hammer 3 times on fresh rounds before his guide asked him if the safety was on. So for those of you that have them, what do you think. Ever drop the hammer only to find out the safety was on? As you can tell, I don't like them and see no need for them no matter what some lawyer says.

  • #2
    I absolutly detest them and have not ever owned a Marlin having one. I understand the whole lawyer risk reason for having it there, silly as it is, but think they could have put it in a better place. I recently traded out of my tricked out Marlin 1895 and into a USRAC 1886. The Marlin was an old pre safety model built in 1976 and I never felt unsafe with it on halfcock the way our forebearers carried their leverguns. The 1886 I have now has a safety, which I wasn't crazy about at first, but since it is located on the tang, where it should be if a levergun must have a safety button, it is not a hiderance at all especially after years of bird hunting with double shotguns. But the Marlin crossbolt is in a hard to reach and unnatural place. Buy Marlins built before 1984 and you don't have to worry about it, just have to shop harder to find them.

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    • #3
      I've got one of Marlin's 1894's in 25-20 with the crossbolt, and after a single incident I "fixed" it myself. I just put a dab of epoxy where it meets the frame and locked in in the off position. I don't plan to get rid of it, but if I did I suppose it could be restored to function without much trouble.

      I've also got a late-release Winnie 94 in 25-35 with the tang safety. Sure looks funny to my eye, but it's never been a problem. I just ignore it.
      "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
      Merle Haggard

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      • #4
        I "fixed" my crossbolt safety. I removed the safety bar, drilled and tapped the hole and filled them with flush screws. I'd say I've gone beyond the possibility of restoring my 1895, but I'll never wonder if the safety is engaged or not!
        Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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        • #5
          I have been thinking of removing/fixing my safety on my guide gun for the same reasons. Anyone have any recommendations where to take it to get it done professionally? Or is there a kit to buy to do this myself?

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          • #6
            I've only got Marlins built before that particular abomination came into being... I've seen several "fixed" though with a kit that makes the hole just look like another pin through the frame. Pretty attractive fix to something that doesn't have a purpose.

            I've been fine and feel confident with the rifle on half-cock although I usually walk about with it hammer down on an empty chamber with a full tube. Just faster to lever the action when in a hurry...I have sat in a stand with a loaded chamber and half cocked hammer though.
            "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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            • #7
              It doesn't bother me a bit. I've owned both. I prefer the one with the cross bolt because of the extra level of safety but its also a habit at this point to just push it in before I shoot. I suspect its just what you get used to and when the pressure's on you resort back to muscle memory.

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              • #8
                Hate, yes HATE them and they go away soon as I get them! Donít mind the ugly tang switch as bad for using but they also go away just on general principle since I get mad every time I see the useless thing on there. Only lawyer locks I have not removed from my guns even though I had planned to are on a couple S&Ws, they are so small I donít see them (then get mad and round up the screw driver) and they have been no problem as yet. There is zero need for any of them especially on a lever gun . . . or any gun with a hammer for that matter.

                I donít even like the transfer bar in my single action revolvers, spent too many years doing the load, click, click, load, click, load, click, load, click, load, let hammer down on a dry hole.
                Andy
                On the web= C-lazy-F.co
                Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
                Call/Text 602-315-2406
                Phoenix Arizona

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Trout bum View Post
                  I have been thinking of removing/fixing my safety on my guide gun for the same reasons. Anyone have any recommendations where to take it to get it done professionally? Or is there a kit to buy to do this myself?
                  Easiest 'fix' is just to put it on 'fire' and put an o-ring on the safety to prevent it from going back to safe.

                  The best way is to but the kit for $9.95

                  http://www.leverguns.com/articles/ta...olt_safety.htm

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                  • #10
                    having used marlins safely for MANY years the addition of a cross-bolt safety was puzzling to me as well. although the use has not changed my hunting style one bit. personally, i like the extra safety when my rifle is in the scabbard ( i am told some guides won't let their hunters chamber a round without permission).
                    lever rifles have been decried at hunting safety classes as being "unsafe for use by young or inexperienced hunters", becaused of an alleged danger while loading/unloading. most of us realize these accidents are solely the fault of the user and not the design....

                    marlin rifles will continue to hold honered status in my rack, additional safety or not.
                    happy trails.
                    jh

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                    • #11
                      Before you disbale a safety, check your homeowners insurance to make sure your liability coverage is high enough

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                      • #12
                        Nice dally post rig on a nice appy there Pine, rifle high/tight like it should be.

                        I grew up horseback with leverguns and they were almost always hot, reedy to go ASAP so you could maybe get a shot off at a coyote before he was gone. We never had any of those live chambered rounds go off, seen guns in all kinds of equine wrecks, wrecks that destroyed the guns, but no discharge without any hammer block device. I have had the hammer slip from under my thumb when decocking and a hammer block would add some insurance there but I feel its benefit is outweighed by the chance it wonít fire when I need it to. Iíve also seen them go off as the bolt closes but a hammer block isnít gonna help that.

                        I guess mostly I just donít like extra doodads that were added due to the court room rather than experience in using the thing as it was intended.
                        Andy
                        On the web= C-lazy-F.co
                        Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
                        Call/Text 602-315-2406
                        Phoenix Arizona

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wildalaska View Post
                          Before you disbale a safety, check your homeowners insurance to make sure your liability coverage is high enough
                          Amen, amen, amen.

                          Even if it's no problem for me, if I permanently disable the safety the next guy I sell or trade the gun to could do something foolish with it. And both his lawyers and the victim's lawyers would be on me like politicians on cash donors. That's what I like about the little dab of epoxy. Quick pass with a torch and it's gone before I part with the gun. If the next guy wants to disable it, that's between him and his own lawyers.
                          "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                          Merle Haggard

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                          • #14
                            I ain't violent on this like some people, but I'm agin'em.

                            I've not had much experience with them, only the one I fiddled with that belonged to a friend of mine. I had some sights fixed, and later put a Scope on it, just enough to learn to hate them, also.

                            A button way up there by the hammer, like that is awkward, and it seemed to be ON even when I remembered putting it OFF.

                            Then, the gun wouldn't go off. OK, the gun was broke, and I'd finally manage to FIX IT by pushing the button back where it belonged. On a positive note, that is a rather easy fix. It's too bad we can't fix all broke guns that way.

                            The first Marlin (336) I owned didn't have the Safety, nor does the one I have currently. I packed it all over the place, most of the time, without even a Sling. I didn't know any better than to have one in the chamber, and I relied on the Half-Cock, but I was aware that if I dropped it, or let it slip downhill from me, to where the hammer could hit a rock, tree, or something, the barrel would be up, towards me, and could ruin my day, or even my life. Beyond that I was cautious.

                            The safety in question is a good safety as far as function, but it's an abnormal contraption. I recognize the need for a safety, on most guns, but I hardly ever use one. I prefer to have my chamber empty, especially with a LA. If you can train yourself to take the safety off, you can train yourself to work the lever.

                            I can get along without a Safety like that, and if I had one on the Marlin 336, I now own, I'd disable it, or not of buyed it in the first place.

                            The extry measure of "safety" it provides is dubious, even if one trained himself, (hard to do, at my age). to pay attention, and use it.

                            On another positive side, I get to hear what AD, and others have to say about them. I wonder if Marlin and Winchester knows, or cares.

                            Smitty of the North
                            Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
                            Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
                            You can't out-give God.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Smitty of the North View Post
                              . . . have one in the chamber, and I relied on the Half-Cock, but I was aware that if I dropped it, or let it slip downhill from me, to where the hammer could hit a rock, tree, or something, the barrel would be up, towards me, and could ruin my day, or even my life.
                              Smitty of the North
                              Donít know on the Marlin but Winchester 94s will bend the hammer ear and not go off, I seen it more-n-onest. I assume (which is often a bad thing to do) that Marlin also had in mind that someone someday would somehow strike that ear on the hammer when they built theirs and took steps similar to Browningís when he designed the Winchesters. Not sayin they couldnít go off in the well known ďdrop it on the hammerĒ deal but I sure donít believe it likely.

                              Now it was well known that a Peacemaker (pre transfer bar) will light off that way, many men and horses learned that the hard way! The remedy for that was very well known and most users loaded 5 in their 6 shooters for that but these same savvy hands just about all packed their lever guns hot. They werenít dumb, they knew their tools, calculated risk accordingly and most died from bad horses or too many years of too much bacon.
                              Andy
                              On the web= C-lazy-F.co
                              Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
                              Call/Text 602-315-2406
                              Phoenix Arizona

                              Comment

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