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  • New To Handloading

    I want to start reloading for my various handguns and a few rifles I own. With absolutely no experience in loading my own ammo a buddy invited me over for reloading 101. He walked me through each step, let me ask questions, and then I loaded 20 rounds of .223 with his guidance. It was really cool and I learned the gist of loading.

    Here's a list of the equipment I plan to buy.

    RCBS (possibly redding) Turret press & a few spare heads
    RCBS 505 powder scale
    RCBS hand primer
    RCBS trickler
    RCBS Powder dropper & stand
    Trimmer LE wilson and case holder
    dies
    digital caliper
    bullet puller
    deburring tools
    a couple of loading blocks
    Stoney point over all length guide
    various manuals, & a basics manual

    But first I think a good starting point is the work bench where all this equipment will live. I'd love to see some pictures of what you guys use for a reloading bench. And any suggestions or comments about my above list would help out. So far, am I on the right track as a beginer?
    sigpic

  • #2
    turret press

    Have you thought about buying a used press? There are quite a few good deals on used presses on ebay. I would also recommend looking at Lyman presses. I have a spar-t turret press that i got used for 50 bucks, and it is a great press. Just wanted to give you a few more options. Good luck.
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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    • #3
      I use pretty much that setup, except I use a Forster co-ax press, and a Redding BR powder thrower, I also don't use a trickler.

      I'd also say stick with Redding dies in the generic 2 die sets.
      Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

      If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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      • #4
        Does sportsmans warehouse or anyone around town carry redding dies?
        sigpic

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        • #5
          tools, bench

          Your list looks pretty good. Might add a case neck brush set for interior neck cleaning and dry lubing with mica and a flash hole deburring tool (both fairly inexpensive). Brass like Norma and Lapua among a few others don't need the flash hole deburred but many other manufacturers swage the pocket and punch the flash hole leaving a burr in the inside of the case surrounding the flash hole- for best results that needs to be lightly reamed and eliminated. As far as the bench goes- anything will work but, as with the press, a good one, home made or commercial, is so much better. It needs to be heavy enough to really anchor the press down for handling resizing stubborn stuff including the large amounts of pressure sometimes needed on the upstroke. Have fun and read and heed the manuals.

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          • #6
            What exactly is the flast hole? Is that the hole where the primer is inserted? If so I plan on buying one of the little brushes to clean out the depression when the primer has been popped out.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              redding dies

              Sportsmans carries redding dies, and i am pretty sure boondocks carries them too. If i remember correctly, boondocks had them a little cheaper, and your money supports local business. I use redding dies for rifles, but for pistols, i use either rcbs or lee carbide dies. They are quite a bit cheaper, and i think they are just as good. The flash hole is the little hole that goes from the primer pocket to the inside of the case.
              All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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              • #8
                Amen to Redding dies. You won't regret going that route. Something I overlook was the simple, inexpensive funnel. Sure makes life easier. Your list looks like a good start. I just began reloading a few months ago.
                For a work bench I went to Home Dept. Purchased 2 sheets of 5/8" plywood 2'x4'. Glue together with a laminated sheet on top. Bolted to a Husky Heavy-Duty X-Sawhorse (20"x24").
                Works well enough that I made another one for placing my reloading "stuff" on, containing assortment of plastic enclosed storage bins.
                The Husky is rated to 750# and makes a very sturdy base for the boards. The Husky is $35.00, the boards and 8 -5/16"x2 1/2" carriage bolts/washers,nuts were about $40.00.(ea. table)
                Reloading to me is a little work, very rewarding, and strangely, somewhat relaxing.
                Any way, Good Luck!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Water_Gremlin View Post
                  I want to start reloading for my various handguns and a few rifles I own. With absolutely no experience in loading my own ammo a buddy invited me over for reloading 101. He walked me through each step, let me ask questions, and then I loaded 20 rounds of .223 with his guidance. It was really cool and I learned the gist of loading.

                  Here's a list of the equipment I plan to buy.

                  RCBS (possibly redding) Turret press & a few spare heads
                  RCBS 505 powder scale
                  RCBS hand primer
                  RCBS trickler
                  RCBS Powder dropper & stand
                  Trimmer LE wilson and case holder
                  dies
                  digital caliper
                  bullet puller
                  deburring tools
                  a couple of loading blocks
                  Stoney point over all length guide
                  various manuals, & a basics manual

                  But first I think a good starting point is the work bench where all this equipment will live. I'd love to see some pictures of what you guys use for a reloading bench. And any suggestions or comments about my above list would help out. So far, am I on the right track as a beginer?
                  W/G,

                  I'll try a picture of a cluttered bench.
                  Attached Files
                  Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    More pics...

                    BTW, The rifle is the new Ruger African 375 Ruger. This bench is 8' long and 3' deep and doubles as a gun smithing and cleaning bench. You probably won't need this many sets of dies to start out.
                    Attached Files
                    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am not sold on turret presses, so I would suggest a single stage press, like the RCBS Rockchucker. To me, swapping dies isn't a big enough deal to warrant twice the money spent on a press. The RCBS RC Master Kit has almost everything you want (if you can live with a single stage press), and you can save a bunch of money vs buying each component separately. It has a RC press, powder measure (no stand), 505 scale, hand priming tool, deburring tool, Speer manual, and some other little stuff. Add the rest of your goodies, and you're set.

                      A couple of other suggestions....
                      I would skip a case trimmer, for starters anyway. You can always get one later. I load calibers based off the .30-06 case, and at $12 a 50, I just toss them when they get long enough to trim. In the meantime, I can get lots of loadings out of a case. Brass is cheap, and trimming is a pain, so I just avoid the whole process.

                      You've recieved good advice concerning dies. Redding dies are the way to go, IMO. Most of my pistol dies are RCBS, and they are fine too.

                      I like the MTM loading blocks better than the RCBS ones. They are less cramped, and they work for all my calibers.

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                      • #12
                        flash hole

                        Water Gremlin,
                        The primer pocket is the place where the primer fits and the flash hole is the small hole where the explosive flame travels from the primer into the body of the case- igniting the powder. When the cases are extruded (drawn) during the manufacturing process a seperate part of the machine making the case punches a hole thru the primer pocket and into the case body forming the flash hole. For those cases that are made this way a bur is usually formed on the inside of the case body and not readily visible with a casual inspection. The deburring tool gets rid of this bur. Most serious shooters using this type of brass remove the bur for more consistent ignition. This operation only has to be done once with new brass. Even with the punched flash holes sometimes the bur is very small and probably not a problem. But, on some lot runs of brass I've seen the burs cover nearly half the flash hole and resemble large flaps that looked like "hanging chads"!! BTW the worst I ever saw was a seasonal run of newly manufactured Winchester 348 brass from a few years ago. Just something to do to eliminate another variable in the reloaded ammo.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the replies. My work gave me a good industrial maple top work bench and I set it up in my downstairs basement tonight. Hopefully this weekend I can hit sportsmans and pick up a majority of the equipment I need plus a few good manuals. I am excited to get my feet wet.
                          sigpic

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                          • #14
                            Reloading set up

                            Lots of great advise here and the only thing I see that I might change is the scales I would upgrade to the rcbs 10-10 its a little better scale and will last forever. Mine is 32 years old now and still going strong I have tried most of them including the electronic ones and always go back to the 10-10.I use a single stage press most of the time a RCBS RC and Dillons 650 for progressive never had a problem with any of them. Good luck with your new hobbie. Ronnie
                            Last edited by Ronnie; 02-14-2007, 03:45. Reason: spelling

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                            • #15
                              Murphy

                              That shelf holding your dies is sagging....I could help lighten the load! Looks like you favor Redding! How would you rate the various die manufacturers and the premium Redding charges?

                              Wyatt

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