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Reloading for a Glock??

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  • Reloading for a Glock??

    I've read that you can't reload brass that has been shot from a glock because the brass isn't fully supported in the barrel. Is this true? I'm thinking about buying a Glock in 357 Sig but won't if I can't reload for it. Also, any negatives with the 357 Sig caliber in general?

    Thanks,
    Mike

  • #2
    voids warranty

    I know for certain that shooting reloads in a glock will void their warranty. Don't know if you care about that. but the thousands of rounds I've shot thru a glock don't look any different than any other spent cartridge.

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    • #3
      The "fully supported" argument is bunk. You can reload brass after it's been fired through a Glock. Your sizer die will fix any irregularities in the brass. I've reloaded thousands of Glock fired brass and have never seen a problem.
      Winter is Coming...

      Go GeocacheAlaska!

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      • #4
        Bunk

        A "fully suported" chamber while different does not prevent the brass from being reloaded once fired in a glock. Brass is nothing more than a loading mechanism that becomes a gasket when put in a chamber. Just be sure and use a taper crimp die on the finished round. Straight cased semi-auto pistols headspace on the case mouth and a taper crimp gives the proper amount of mouth for that job. I'm not sure what the 357 sig headspaces on; I can only assume the shoulder, since it is a bottlenecked round. I've never reloaded for a bottlenecked semi-auto pistol; YET .

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        • #5
          Just in case your not convinced Ill back up what everyone has stated so far. Bunk rumor. I've got brass that is on its 4th loading. Its just fine. once ran through the sizer it looks like any other piece of brass.

          Even the unsized empties look just fine.

          Alot of this rumor probably gets around from people loading super hot loads. Ill admit, on some of my warmer loads you can see the ever so slight bulge, but so far has not caused any issues with reloading.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JOAT View Post
            The "fully supported" argument is bunk. You can reload brass after it's been fired through a Glock. Your sizer die will fix any irregularities in the brass. I've reloaded thousands of Glock fired brass and have never seen a problem.

            Ditto! I agree. I've reloaded tens of thousands of rounds fired through a Glock through and through. It does state in the owners manual that rloaded ammo voids the warranty as do most manufacturers for all their guns .....I don't pay any attention to that and I'm still loading ammo for Glocks...lots and lots of ammo for Glocks. This whole crock of crap about the Glock and it's unsupported chamber is so much drivel it is laughable.

            A GLOCK IS A STRONG A ND SAFE PISTOL AND WILL USE ANY AMMO ANY OTHER MODEL WILL EVER USE AND CERTAINLY ANY THAT IS SAAMI SPEC'D.

            As for the 357 SiG caliber it is a really hot 9mm. Lots of folks like it.
            Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?


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            • #7
              The trouble is supposed to be when that unsupported section is resized and pushed back into shape it is weakened. Then that section has to line up perfectly with the unsupported area of the chamber the next time it is fired. I witnessed one blow up one time. Blew straight down and took out the trigger but left the guy's finger in tact, lucky.

              Can't say for sure if it was case failure or a double charge but it made me a believer.

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              • #8
                Most 1911s use unsupported chambers. Are we not supposed to load for those? The unsupported part can be blown out but not at normal pressures. And when you do load TOO HOT that is the place it blows because it is the weak point. But still safe at normal pressure. I've seen 1911s blow cases also but still not at normal pressures. Too much pressure KBOOM with any gun.

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                • #9
                  After resizing, an area of minor deformity is the same as the rest of the case again. There is nothing to "line up". This area of the case is also the strongest part. You'd have to really overload to rupture this. If you stay at least 10% below published hot loads, you will never have any of these problems.
                  Winter is Coming...

                  Go GeocacheAlaska!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hntr View Post
                    The trouble is supposed to be when that unsupported section is resized and pushed back into shape it is weakened. Then that section has to line up perfectly with the unsupported area of the chamber the next time it is fired. I witnessed one blow up one time. Blew straight down and took out the trigger but left the guy's finger in tact, lucky.

                    Can't say for sure if it was case failure or a double charge but it made me a believer.

                    I say again. Mule muffins!! What blows up is the overloaded, beyond SAAMI specified pressure regardless of caliber. The SiG is as unsupported as the Glock and we don't cry about that one. Have you ever seen a SiG Blow up? How about a 1911 which is as unsupported in a 45 ACP as any Glock.
                    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?


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                    • #11
                      It's possible that it was a double charge but when it happen it was noted that there were many cases of this occurring in glocks and there were no mention of any other handguns that this has happened in.

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                      • #12
                        What was the caliber? I'll guess 40S&W, which normally runs very high chamber pressure and is quite easy to push beyond the red line. I know of a G22 that blew up as well. The guy was homeloading hot and also running lead bullets. The combo destroyed the gun, but the blast went upward as it split open the top of the chamber. The guy was lucky not to suffer any injury. The gun was "totaled".
                        Winter is Coming...

                        Go GeocacheAlaska!

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                        • #13
                          It was a 40 and I think that the instructor stated that it was glock 22's that were blowing up so that makes sense.

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                          • #14
                            I have loaded and shot a lot of jacketed, plated and lead bullets through a glock 21 and several 22s. The 21 handles everything nicely, the 22s didn't like my lead bullets and leaded badly. Didn't bother to find out why as they weren't my guns. Using plated or jacketed with normal pressure they worked fine without bulging cases or anything else abnormal. Watch carefully for leading in polygon barrels and either fix it or don't shoot lead. ALL guns blow up from too much pressure. Glock 22s operate at close to kboom pressure to start with . It doesn't take much increased pressure from someones hot handload to push it over the edge. Some people just can't resist pushing the edge. So it's not handloading that is the problem it's improper handloading. Pressure signs can be hard to read on handguns, but if your getting bulges in the case head area you better back off.

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                            • #15
                              JOAT has a very good point that the SAAMI pressures for .45 ACP and .357 Sig are wildly different. The argument that most .45 ACP 1911 pistols have unsupported chambers is irrelevant because it operates at about half the pressure of .357 Sig. (21k psi vs 40k psi).

                              I've also noticed what seems like different loading trends for the two cartridges (everyone with a 1911 seems to want to load it so light that it barely cycles with a normal 16 lb. recoil spring, vs. everyone shooting .357 Sig wants to launch bullets at warp speed).

                              I should point out that I don't shoot, nor load .357 Sig, but my observations loading .45 ACP have been that it is extremely sensitive to bullet setback, being a short fat cartridge. My own experiments with varying OALs and W231 powder have shown very significant differences in velocity and ES, which tells me it's having a very significant effect on pressure. What would happen if you have a new reloader who doesn't happen to get very good neck tension on his .357 Sig rounds, and foolishly started with the max load in a given manual? The first couple rounds go off just fine, but then a bullet moves back in the case and spikes pressure. The first rounds which might still be within SAAMI max pressure only show bulged brass, but that bullet that moved back caused pressure to hit 50k psi, and there's no way the brass can contain the pressure anymore, so you get the stereotypical Glock "kaboom" which the .45 ACP shooters adamantly claim is impossible because their own brass looks fine. That scenario is totally fictional, but I can easily see it happening.

                              Personally, if I did load .357 Sig I would be nervous if any of my brass showed bulged cases--to me that's a crystal clear danger sign! To say that it's all good because the sizing die will iron out the bulge seems similar to saying that "I'm getting awesome velocities from this load in my '06, but the primers keep falling out when I eject the fired case. It's all good though because when I run the brass through the sizing die, it punches out the spent primer anyhow." (It should go without saying that primers falling out of rifle brass upon ejection generally indicates extremely excessive pressure).

                              I may be overlooking something, but I'm right there with rbuck351--bulged brass at the case head area is a problem and indicative of excessive pressure. It should not be viewed as normal.

                              Mike

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