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  • annealing brass

    I'd like to hear from all the wildcatters on this website to find out their own way to anneal . I heat the cases as they stand in a cake pan with an inch of water and tip over after the torch , anybody have a more high tech way ?

  • #2
    one experts recommendation: http://www.24hourcampfire.com/annealing.html
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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    • #3
      For more hi-tech go to:https://www.hornady.com/shop/?ps_ses...642821e50f721c and scroll down to annealing brass.
      "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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      • #4
        Some good info on this thread in the handloader forum:
        http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ghlight=anneal

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        • #5
          THANKS!!! Thanks for the help. J.

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          • #6
            The only thing I'd add is you can make your own small turntable to spin the case while heating for a nice, even heat. Then pluck it into the sink full of water.
            Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

            Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

            You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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            • #7
              Dip the neck in melted lead for about 2 seconds and then drop in water. Nice even heat and can be controled by thermostat on lead pot.

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              • #8
                Water? and Molten Lead?

                Originally posted by rbuck351 View Post
                Dip the neck in melted lead for about 2 seconds and then drop in water. Nice even heat and can be controled by thermostat on lead pot.
                Just be sure to keep that water FAR AWAY from the molten lead. A stray droplet hitting the lead will explode and scater hot lead with it. (I am told it is quite spectacular, but have never experienced it.)

                Always use eye protection around molten anything and have good ventilation.

                Safety first.

                Lost Sheep

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                • #9
                  Actually a drop of water hitting the lead doesn't do much. What does get exciting is getting a drop under the surface of the lead as it will empty the pot instantly. I've done this twice. The first time I just didn't think about what could happen if water got into 700 degree lead. I was water cooling cast boolit and dumped some culls back in the pot when it erupted. The second time was also dumping water cooled culls back in the pot. These had been sitting for days and were dry I thought. Apparently, one had a air bubble in the base and was still wet inside. Anyway the tinsel fairy visited again. So, although a drop of water on top of hot lead will just sizzle, any amount of water under the surface will empty the pot. Any water cooled culls now go in the pot before melting to drive of the water before the lead melts. I had to learn the hard way as there weren't internet forums like this 40 years ago. Anyway, do be careful with water around melted lead. I was very lucky and only got a couple of tiny pieces of lead to peel off my skin.

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                  • #10
                    I had a bad day myself

                    Originally posted by rbuck351 View Post
                    Anyway the tinsel fairy visited again.
                    Now thats funny!!

                    Years ago when I was first starting to play with blacksmithing as a sideline I took an order for a silver horse shoe. I picked up 2 once of .998% pure silver and cast a plaster mold of a very pretty steel horse shoe I had made. I baked the mold at 400 degrees in the oven for an hour and set the project aside for a week to do more pressing work. When I got time I melted the silver and poured it into the mold . . . BOOM!!!

                    The mold exploded and molten silver went to every corner of the shop. I spent the better part of a day sifting silver from the dirt floor of my blacksmith shop. The silver tinsel was easy to pick up and very pretty, but the thousands of little BB's made for a very bad day! I lost about $150 on that little lesson. I found out later the finished project was great and was given to President Bush “one” the day he was inaugurated. I only found that out when his finance people called me to find out its value.

                    Andy
                    Andy
                    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
                    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
                    Call/Text 602-315-2406
                    Phoenix Arizona

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                    • #11
                      The proceedure described in Ken Howells book (or 24hr campfire) is the way to go. The magic temperature is 650 degrees F and the best way to get that consistant ly is with the 650 F crayon. I have an extra if you need one.
                      Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?


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