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Not everyone should consider reloading ammo.

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  • Not everyone should consider reloading ammo.

    You folk have heard me mention James Henry on this forum before. Well james has a brother named John who even throws more caution to the wind. He rushes 900 mph through every project that he attempts.

    When I got home from work last night there sat his model 94AE carbine in 357 with a note attached saying that he had broken his gun and could I fix it. A once over revealed that it had a stuck case in the chamber. A little more investigating showed that the loading gate was gone and the front half of the lifter was gone. I called John Bob and asked him what happened. It was the first reload that he ever shot through the gun and apparently things went wrong.

    The gun looks salvageable. I got the stuck brass out without damaging the chamber and took the gun apart far enough to see that the receiver looks to be ok. Several internal parts are going to have to be replaced. A no go gauge should be the first step to make sure the chamber is still the right size. It's not a job that I am willing to take on as I am nothing more than a tinkerer and a man has to know his limitations.

    I went over to his house to look at what could have gone wrong at his makeshift reloading setup(More curiosity than anything). It was real obvious. He was using Lee dippers and one of them had written on the side of it in permanent marker 10.0 Tiegroup....it was intended for 44 magnum usage. That amount filled the 357 case right up. Hodgdons web sight is printed right on the bottle and they offer free load data. Not a reloading manual one in his possession. It makes me wonder how he has lived to be 60 years old.

    I am not very sympathetic by nature anyway but this time it is not at all.

  • #2
    That's crazy! Some people just shouldn't reload especially if they are not going to use any data let alone the correct data.
    Lucky he still has all of his digits!
    My buddy brought over his 21 year old nephew with his old .45 flintlock Kentucky rifle a couple months ago.
    He had got a deal on it from another uncle.
    Well first time out he dryballed it.
    So it sat for a year.
    I helped him remove the old ball out of it.
    He showed me his collection of loading equipment for his gun.
    1/2 a dozen balls all appearing out of round, a bottle of Pyrodex,a set of kitchen measuring spoons and a few patches from a random (not consistent in thickness) old t-shirt.
    How many grains a measuring spoon holds and which one he used I'm not sure about!!!
    I'm going to make sure in the future he uses some good powder(I have several pounds of real black powder in 3fg and 2fg) and an appropriate powder measure that actually measures in grains!
    I gave him some 100% cotton patches I had lying around that I had cut after measuring the diameter with my micrometer.
    I've got a heavy duty box to contain all my black powder range equipment including the correct powder measures etc.
    And the proper molds for my .50 Cal muzzle loader and .44 Cal cap and ball pistol.
    He kept asking me if I thought the .454 mold for my pistol would work for patched balls in his rifle.
    Of course it won't being oversized like that. My mold is oversized specifically to shave off a lead ring when loading to ensure a tight seal and prevent chain firing.
    I did order a .440 diameter round ball mold for his rifle.
    I told him if he helps me with some gardening I'll teach him to cast some lead and properly load his rifle as well as make some correct patches and lube.

    Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    • #3
      James Henry ???

      Is he one of those, seeking the Nomination to run for president?

      Smitty of the North
      Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
      Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
      You can't out-give God.

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      • #4
        No Smitty, it pains me to say but we have some dumb ones on our side as well!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
          No Smitty, it pains me to say but we have some dumb ones on our side as well!
          I agree, that "Not everyone should consider reloading ammo." However, judging by what I've seen, that would qualify such a person to seek the nomination. It would be a decided PLUS.

          Smitty of the North
          Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
          Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
          You can't out-give God.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have given advice and showed people what I know often enough. I impress on everyone that it is a process and not to go off book. Once they see the process, they get it. I can't imagine somebody just trying to wing it. 30 seconds on YouTube and you can get an idea of the complexity and have a plan.

            Some people just got to tinker, it is in their nature. Reloading can drive you nuts tinkering out all everything, but it is done very organized. I know a lot of people that just don't have it in them to be methodical enough. I also know some folks that don't hardly tinker at all. They get the book out, load a few rounds that get close. Load 200 rounds and get the gear out again in 5 years when they run out. To each their own.

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            • #7
              I think it was my 16th birthday when dad took me to one of the local gun stores. We went to the counter and dad asked the clerk what was needed to start loading for a 12 ga shotgun. Dad bought a Lee whack a mole loader, a lb of red dot, 5 lb bag of shot, a box of primers, a box of plastic over powder wads, a box of under shot cushion wads and a Speer loading manual. When he paid for this he hands it to me and says here's your birthday present. He didn't know to reload and neither did I. This was about 1964 and I still have both eyes and all my fingers. However, I told my best friend of my good fortune and he borrowed the loader and manual. Another friend had just bought a new Ithaca single shot 12ga 3" and because shells were very expensive for kids our age, he ask my buddy to load him some 3" shells. Apparently my buddy didn't read much of the manual and only having red dot powder, he just added another half scoop or so. Then to make matters worse added the max load of shot for a 3" shell and when that didn't quite fill the case he just added more shot. So his friend takes his new shotgun and a handful of shells out to the duck pond and snuck up on a few ducks. He said when he pulled the trigger the world went quiet and his gun fell apart with a shell sized piece of the back of the barrel missing and the lug gone from the action. Fortunately the missing barrel piece went away from his head instead of through his head and the only damage to him was a broken eardrum. Some folks should not play with things any more dangerous than a marshmallow and for sure should not reload ammo. Come to think of it, the marshmallow may be too much. They are really hot and sticky when making somores.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by rbuck351 View Post
                I think it was my 16th birthday when dad took me to one of the local gun stores. We went to the counter and dad asked the clerk what was needed to start loading for a 12 ga shotgun. Dad bought a Lee whack a mole loader, a lb of red dot, 5 lb bag of shot, a box of primers, a box of plastic over powder wads, a box of under shot cushion wads and a Speer loading manual. When he paid for this he hands it to me and says here's your birthday present. He didn't know to reload and neither did I. This was about 1964 and I still have both eyes and all my fingers. However, I told my best friend of my good fortune and he borrowed the loader and manual. Another friend had just bought a new Ithaca single shot 12ga 3" and because shells were very expensive for kids our age, he ask my buddy to load him some 3" shells. Apparently my buddy didn't read much of the manual and only having red dot powder, he just added another half scoop or so. Then to make matters worse added the max load of shot for a 3" shell and when that didn't quite fill the case he just added more shot. So his friend takes his new shotgun and a handful of shells out to the duck pond and snuck up on a few ducks. He said when he pulled the trigger the world went quiet and his gun fell apart with a shell sized piece of the back of the barrel missing and the lug gone from the action. Fortunately the missing barrel piece went away from his head instead of through his head and the only damage to him was a broken eardrum. Some folks should not play with things any more dangerous than a marshmallow and for sure should not reload ammo. Come to think of it, the marshmallow may be too much. They are really hot and sticky when making somores.
                Thatís interesting a shotgun would break an eardrum. I witnessed a marlin guide gun come apart due to an overload and there was just a pop, sounded more like a primer being struck.

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                • #9
                  It seems more interesting that a rifle would let go with just a pop. My guess would be that it would take 60,000 psi or more to destroy a Marlin. That kind of pressure released instantly should make a pretty loud bang. The shotgun broke a piece out of the very back of the barrel around 6" to 8" from his right ear. What broke on the Marlin?

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