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  • #16
    Yeah, If the bolt is sticking, I'd think that there would be marks on the case head and maybe the primers flattened more than usual.

    That's why I suggested trying FLs for comparison.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    • #17
      All,

      So I went back to the range on Sunday after taking some advice on trying different powder. I loaded up Varget, from min to max (sorry I don't remember the amount of grains, log book is at home, but I went off the Hodgdon website for values).

      Only had the bolt stick once on me and I was able to get to the max load. The only thing I really did different this batch was I washed my brass with soapy water after sizing it to get all of the case lube off the brass. (same bullets, cases, and primers as before)


      Any thoughts on if left over lube could have been the cause of the sticky bolt?

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      • #18
        Yup, a sticky or dirty chamber, In this case excessive case lube?
        You'll get lots of opinions, here's mine and it's absolutely free ad worth every penny:

        Take it out of the stock, remove the bolt, use denatured alcohol, Wrap a piece of lint free clot (or shop towel) and a toothbrush, flush it out. Let it air dry, then clean and OIL. Remove or protect the scope

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        • #19
          Or soft brass which will show up as high pressure

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          • #20
            Rifle is 3 years old, first time you shot it? Have you run some off the shelf ammo?
            “We have digressed from a Nation of Revolutionaries to a country of entitlements"

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            • #21
              I've probably put 200 rounds through the gun before this weekend with factory ammo and it never happened before. I'm thinking the left over case oil may be the cause, but not 100% sure that this time.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by sockeyefun View Post
                All,
                Only had the bolt stick once on me and I was able to get to the max load. The only thing I really did different this batch was I washed my brass with soapy water after sizing it to get all of the case lube off the brass.
                Just because you have a reloading manual stating a "max. load", why do you feel that you need a max. load? I'd be looking for a load with good velocity and the best accuracy which may or may not be a max. load.

                Patriot Life Member NRA
                Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
                Life Member Disabled American Veterans


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                • #23
                  Originally posted by sockeyefun View Post
                  All,

                  So I went back to the range on Sunday after taking some advice on trying different powder. I loaded up Varget, from min to max (sorry I don't remember the amount of grains, log book is at home, but I went off the Hodgdon website for values).

                  Only had the bolt stick once on me and I was able to get to the max load. The only thing I really did different this batch was I washed my brass with soapy water after sizing it to get all of the case lube off the brass. (same bullets, cases, and primers as before)


                  Any thoughts on if left over lube could have been the cause of the sticky bolt?
                  My thought, is NOPE.

                  Wiping the lube off is sufficient. EXCESS lube on the case can increase pressure on the bolt, because the sides don't stick to the chamber. Lube on the NECK is very Dangerous because it can keep the NECK from expanding to release the bullet. I don't know that you can have pressure high enough to cause a sticky bolt, and not have other pressure signs on the case. ???

                  If FLs do not exhibit any problems, then your rifle is not your problem, but the load.

                  "Excess Lube", implies that you wiped it off. Which should be sufficient. I use cotton cloth or paper towel. Some folks use their tumbler.

                  Your attachments are INVALID. What is the condition of your fired cases? (Marks on the case head? ) How do the primers look compared to fired FLs? Are there any pressure signs besides the sticky bolt?

                  I don't think lube is your problem, based on what you've revealed so far.

                  I wonder if you just have a HOT Lot of BLC2. I've heard that powder can vary somewhat with the Lot Number.

                  Smitty of the North
                  Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
                  Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
                  You can't out-give God.

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                  • #24
                    Fed brass is often soft brass which will expand and show hi pressure signs at modest loads. If chrono shows average speed I would swap brass and work up and re chrono.

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                    • #25
                      What a couple others said, might be to hot for your rifle. I'm assuming the brass is sized right nd the brass cycles easily before firing? If your not over published max and your bullets ain't jammed into the rifling and increasing pressure I would load a few up with twao grains less powder and see if bolt is still sticky.

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                      • #26
                        May sound minor, but worth asking so you can check it off the list:

                        Are you chamfering the case mouths after trimming? Some ways of trimming can leave a little lip of brass there, hardly big enough to notice. But in a rifle built with minimum chamber dimensions it's enough to cause the case not to release the bullet freely, driving up pressures quickly.

                        Easy way to check that, and even wall thickness of your cases: Drop a bullet into the mouth of a fired case. If it thunks the bottom of the case, you're golden. If it hangs up or drags in the neck, time to take a close look at the necks and case mouths.

                        Your guess of oil in the chamber is another good one. Cased need to briefly grab the chamber walls on firing, but won't if there's oil in there.
                        "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                        Merle Haggard

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                        • #27
                          I will check what both of you have suggested to see if that makes a difference. I do know that I did debur the cases, but can confirm with the bullet drop test suggested.

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