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  • Barnes TTSX question

    I have been loading the Barnes 168g TSX in the 30-06 and have great results over 55 grains of H4350. I have a box of the TTSX and want to load them up and give them a whirl. My question is has anyone gone through this before and did you have to start from scratch with your load or did the same powder and seating depth give you the same results?
    The TSX bullet is 1.318" long and the Tipped is 1.418". I have already checked and made sure magazine fit wasn't a problem. Just curious if the two shot differently.

    Another question is point of impact differences between let's say the 168g and a 220g. Would like to make up a decent load in case of a bear oppertunity. When you guys shoot different grain bullets, do you just make a mental note of the POI difference and do hold over/under or is it minimal at lets say 200yds?
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

  • #2
    Originally posted by alaskabliss View Post
    Another question is point of impact differences between let's say the 168g and a 220g. Would like to make up a decent load in case of a bear oppertunity. When you guys shoot different grain bullets?
    It's a good practice if changing anything in a load- primer, case, powder, or bullet...drop back to starting loads and work up.

    Regarding different bullets, I don't.... your 168gr TSX will probably penetrate as well as anything fired out of an '06....including the 220gr. Those Barnes really penetrate and hold together.

    I'm kind of a one load sort of guy... switching stuff around in the field usually doesn't work out too well. My $.02
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    • #3
      Appreciate that Hodgeman, I am usually a one round guy too but was thinking about experimenting. If the general consenses is that the 168g will do what it needs to do then I will stick to it. I have had great results with it with Caribou and have never had a caribou complain. I tend to stick to a little lighter bullet for velocity, Something I feel kills. after doing some research I came up with this:
      168g TSX 200yd 2422 fps 2187 E ftlbs
      220 corlok 200yd 1870 fps 1708 E ftlbs

      Seems that the 168 out performs the 220 hands down @ 200yds

      At 100yds, something you might need for bear, lets say, the story is the same:

      168g 2610 v 2541 E
      220 2125 v 2205 E

      This supports my theory on Velocity kills. Again Hodgeman, thanks for getting me thinking.
      Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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      • #4
        I have used 168 TSX out of a RUM and then switched to TTSX. The point of impact was close and the powder charge and primers were the same, but I had to fiddle with the seating depth for the TTSX to get them to group good. The ogive is different with the two bullets. If you are having trouble seating the TTSX close enough to the lands, the TSX might give you a little more reach and work better. The difference in BC between the TSX and TTSX will not make a hoot of difference to 400 yards.

        I would not be as worried about bullet weight as much as bullet construction. When comparing a 220 corelok to a 168 TSX it is like comparing apples to airplanes. Compare the 168 TSX to the 200 TSX flat base and see how your numbers do. The 220 corelok will be a grenade and loose all sorts of mass rendering it less than optimal in a DLP situation. The Barnes bullets are perfect for hunting and DLP as they stay together and penetrate as good of not better than any hunting bullet there is. Only thing that will penetrate better is a solid.

        If you shoot a P.O.'ed grizzly in the front section with a TSX at very close range, you will have a good chance of hitting some bone and changing the channel to give you a chance at a follow up shot. I would not be confident with the corelok. I have seen them come completely apart on pigs at DLP ranges, and would not trust them on a bear.

        If you really want to have a round for close range grizzly work, then load some solids for packing the rifle around after a kill. Maybe look at the Cutting Edge Raptor bullet, they look cool. You may look a the 220g partition. They stay together real well too and have a ton of load data out there.

        Otherwise, kill with authority using the 168 (t)tsx.

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        • #5
          I am pretty sure the ogives are the same for the 168 tsx and the 168 ttsx but will have to look at the barnes manual. I have always been told the only difference between the ttsx and tsx was the plastic tip. Since i am at work i will not be able to check til tonight. There is a difference betweem the 165 and 168 though for sure.
          "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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          • #6
            As the others say....."stick with one quality bullet"......that Barnes will penetrate very well.

            The other consideration for loading the tipped version is length of magazine box.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by shphtr View Post
              I am pretty sure the ogives are the same for the 168 tsx and the 168 ttsx but will have to look at the barnes manual. I have always been told the only difference between the ttsx and tsx was the plastic tip. Since i am at work i will not be able to check til tonight. There is a difference betweem the 165 and 168 though for sure.
              They both are the same Ogive. Could be some of the older TSX had a different Ogive since they did change them at one point.
              Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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              • #8
                Originally posted by alaskabliss View Post
                They both are the same Ogive. Could be some of the older TSX had a different Ogive since they did change them at one point.
                Can't speak directly to the .30's, but have been using .338's since the original X, through the blue coated X, to the current version TSX, and can report the ogives have changed many times as things have evolved. Seems like Barnes is always tweeking and improving, and I've found it pays to double check any time I'm not working from the same lot number.
                ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
                I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
                The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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                • #9
                  I have discussed with the Barnes' technicians why they have both a 165 and a 168 gr. 30 cal. They explained that the ogive for the 168 is based on extensive testing by the army, and tho it did not produce the highest BC it was shown to be a very accurate configuration, which based on my experience has certainly been the case.
                  "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shphtr View Post
                    I have discussed with the Barnes' technicians why they have both a 165 and a 168 gr. 30 cal. They explained that the ogive for the 168 is based on extensive testing by the army, and tho it did not produce the highest BC it was shown to be a very accurate configuration, which based on my experience has certainly been the case.
                    Interesting . . . Thanks for sharing.
                    I think about hunting when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day. And I think about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm doing it. ~credit to Carl Yastrzemski~

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                    • #11
                      From the Barnes web page:Is the 168-grain .30-caliber TSX the same as the 165-grain TSX? Is it really a match-grade hunting bullet?
                      These bullets have different ogive geometries. The 165-grain TSX incorporates a shorter tangent ogive in the nose profile. Itís designed for cartridges with short magazines such as the .300 WSM and .300 Win Mag. The 168-grain TSX BT has a secant ogive which lengthens the nose profile and has shown superb accuracy downrange. It offers the best of both worlds because itís also a premium hunting bullet offering exceptional terminal performance. It is best suited for cartridges such as the .308 Winchester, .30-06 and .300 Weatherby.


                      "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hodgeman View Post
                        From the Barnes web page:Is the 168-grain .30-caliber TSX the same as the 165-grain TSX? Is it really a match-grade hunting bullet?
                        These bullets have different ogive geometries. The 165-grain TSX incorporates a shorter tangent ogive in the nose profile. Itís designed for cartridges with short magazines such as the .300 WSM and .300 Win Mag. The 168-grain TSX BT has a secant ogive which lengthens the nose profile and has shown superb accuracy downrange. It offers the best of both worlds because itís also a premium hunting bullet offering exceptional terminal performance. It is best suited for cartridges such as the .308 Winchester, .30-06 and .300 Weatherby.


                        Barnes does a good job with there FAQ. I sent them an Email the other day and they answered my questions fast too. Gotta love good customer service
                        Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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                        • #13
                          Loaded up some 168 grain TTSX rounds for the 30-06. Winchester cases, WLR primers, 59 grains H 4350 with the bullet seated to give COAL, measured with a Hornady bullet comparator to 2.610. The key is to measure and seat every round to achieve the exact same COAL. What a pain. I need to look at some Redding dies I think.

                          These grouped less then 3/4" at 100yds @ a smokin 3040fps. I had a hard time getting a standard deviation
                          since my buddy was shooting his .220 Swift next to me and it would set the chrony off.

                          Great load except it gets the barrel pretty hot in a hurry. I can get three shots before the barrel gets too hot to maintain the group. It actually will have a flyer after the first three rounds then group again.

                          The rifle is a Tikka T3 super light so I was suprised with the velocity but the thin barrel explains the heating issue. It's a hunting rifle so I am not as concerned with the three shot limitation. Even after it consistently groups to the left 2"'s. Now to ask a caribou what he thinks of the new load.
                          Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by alaskabliss View Post
                            The rifle is a Tikka T3 super light so I was suprised with the velocity
                            Just curious. What does being a Tikka T3 have anything to do with velocity achievement with bullets?


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                            If you think you're free, there's no escape possible.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Hoyt-Hunter View Post
                              Just curious. What does being a Tikka T3 have anything to do with velocity achievement with bullets?


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                              After a look at the Tikka web page the lighter t3 the shorter the barrel. From 20 to 24 3/8 inches.
                              Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
                              Unknown author

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