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  • handguns in cargo

    I know of a guy moving up and is going to ship his long guns to himself, his wife is flying up it is legal to have handguns in a locked weapons box on the plane? how many, multiples?
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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  • #2
    Handguns in checked baggage

    I don't know of any limit on number but check with the carrier or carriers. She will also need to get extra insurance to cover the guns- the standard baggage insurance doesn't cover very much.

    Originally posted by ironartist View Post
    I know of a guy moving up and is going to ship his long guns to himself, his wife is flying up it is legal to have handguns in a locked weapons box on the plane? how many, multiples?
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    • #3
      There's no limit, you just need to have them unloaded in a lockable hard case. Flying with guns is usually very easy and hassle free, but every now and then you'll get someone from either TSA or the airline who's a huge pain in the ass.

      http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtrav...rial_1666.shtm

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      • #4
        each airline seems to have its own rules of carriage, as to the number. Bag weight is also a limiter. Military members on orders have different limits as well. Check the airline web site for info, print off and take with you. You may have to educate the agent.

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        • #5
          Yes TSA is different than the airlines. Once Delta would only allow two guns in a case. I have routinely carried two long guns and two hand guns in a single case on AK Airlines. But check what they say. I have also taken two gun hard side gun cases and had one case with two long guns and two pistols and the second with two long guns. Then I duct taped the two cases together after packing with knives and other stuff to make them right at 50lbs on Alaska Airlines. Then didn't have any issues with it but it was in Alaska travel.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by AKFishOn View Post
            Then I duct taped the two cases together after packing with knives and other stuff to make them right at 50lbs on Alaska Airlines. Then didn't have any issues with it but it was in Alaska travel.
            I did that trick last time I flew back from Arizona. My Dad had died and I had 7 rifles and 6 handguns on the trip back, they wanted a extra bag fee of $150 each after the 4th so I said “dang I should have tied them together!” The ticket lady agreed that would work and my brother that was dropping me off went and got a couple rolls of tape from his truck! It would have been about $1000 in bag fees but after liberal amounts of tape it was just under $200 in fees!

            The time before that I checked 2 bags, a pelican with several guns and a 160 pound blacksmith anvil for just a $45 heavy bag fee. I was a bit embarrassed about the anvil watching the baggage guys bust their butts in 110 degrees loading it then again when it sounded like it broke the turn table in Anchorage . . . but hay, it just $45!
            Andy
            On the web= C-lazy-F.co
            Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
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            Phoenix Arizona

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            • #7
              Originally posted by F-Trooper05 View Post
              There's no limit, you just need to have them unloaded in a lockable hard case. Flying with guns is usually very easy and hassle free, but every now and then you'll get someone from either TSA or the airline who's a huge pain in the ass.

              http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtrav...rial_1666.shtm
              Totally correct. Things that can help smooth the process...
              - Printout of TSA page
              - Printout of the airline's checked baggage firearms policy (in case the person working the counter doesn't know it)
              - Ensure any ammo is packed securely, preferably in original manufacturer's box or one of those MTM hard plastic containers. No more than 11 lbs of ammo is generally the rule.
              - Locks -- have good locks for it that securely hold the case totally shut, with not even a few mm of "wiggle" room or opening possible. I would use locks that only YOU have the key or combo for, not TSA locks, per the governing statute: "The firearm must be carried in a hard-sided container. The container must be locked and only the passenger may retain the key or combination. "
              - Markings --Ensure there are no obvious markings on the outside that indicate there's a firearm inside... Don't let them slap anything that marks the case as obviously having a firearm inside either. The orange tag that they give you goes on the inside, not the outside.
              - First impressions: Be polite and confident. Call the guns "unloaded firearms" (that's what the agent is used to hearing, and that's what their tags say). If you can pack them with the slides back so that you don't have to handle them to show that they're unloaded then that is probably smart too.
              - Check itinerary; if there are any connections through "hostile territory" where you might get stranded for something like weather or a missed connection (for example, a NY or NJ airport) then do your research and have a plan. It might not be a bad idea to have a copy of the FOPA, and if you do end up stranded, BEFORE taking possession of the luggage ask the airline and/or police for assistance.

              Generally it is not a big deal though.

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              • #8
                Ammo varies from 4lbs to 50 lbs, depends on the airlines...

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                • #9
                  I have done this many times and its no hassle. The fire arm needs to be unloaded with action open, no ammo in same gun case, firearm needs to be in a lockable hard case. When you enter the airport go to your airline counter and disclose your firearm, they will ask you to open the case and place a signed disclosure form inside. Lock it back up and then take it to TSA. All done.
                  Originally posted by ironartist View Post
                  I know of a guy moving up and is going to ship his long guns to himself, his wife is flying up it is legal to have handguns in a locked weapons box on the plane? how many, multiples?
                  May God Bless The USA!
                  If you don't study and understand history, your doomed to repeat it!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ironartist View Post
                    I know of a guy moving up and is going to ship his long guns to himself, his wife is flying up it is legal to have handguns in a locked weapons box on the plane? how many, multiples?
                    Here is AA rules of Carriage, check the ailine in question, as rules do vary with carrier. Good idea to bring a copy with you. TSA told me last time (Aug 2010) no TSA locks on gun cases

                    Transporting Firearms

                    Firearms Definition

                    The term "firearm" describes any weapon that will or is designed to or may be readily converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive, or the frame or receiver of any such weapon. This includes:
                    • Sporting rifles, shotguns, and handguns
                    • Handguns of authorized law enforcement officers while traveling on official duty
                    • Starter pistols, compressed air or BB guns, and flare pistols
                    • Antique firearms
                    Handguns must be unloaded and packed in a hard-sided container locked with a key or lock combination only in the traveler's possession. The locked hard-sided case can be placed in a soft-sided case.
                    Rifles, shotguns, and other firearms must be unloaded and carried in a locked hard-sided container where only the customer retains the key. We also recommend that the bolt be removed and the slide locked open. All parts of the firearm must be packed in the same container as the firearm itself.
                    Please Note: Some firearm cases have multiple areas for locks. Each area designed for locks must have a lock in place.
                    Alaska Airlines does not allow customers under age 18 to carry on or check a firearm.
                    Firearms / Shooting Equipment

                    The following items may be included in your normal baggage allowance. Excess charges will apply for additional pieces of baggage. All items must be suitably packaged for transport.
                    • Shooting Equipment
                      1. One rifle case with rifles, scopes, one shooting mat, noise suppressors and small tools, or
                      2. One shotgun case with shotguns, or
                      3. One pistol case with pistols, noise suppressors, one pistol telescope and small pistol tools
                    • Ammunition—up to 50 lbs.(domestic) and 11 lbs. (international - where permitted) may be checked, if securely packed in the original manufacturer's package or in a container designed for ammunition and of sufficient strength to protect it from accidental crushing or discharge (i.e. wood, fiber, plastic, or metal). The projectile must be no larger than 11/16" in diameter, the size of a dime. Ammunition may be checked with or separately from the firearm. Spent ammunition shells will be accepted in checked baggage provided they meet the same acceptance procedures as live ammunition (e.g. packed in a crush-proof case).
                    Firearm Declaration

                    Identify all bags containing firearms when you check in. Firearms must be unloaded. You will be asked to read and sign a special tag for each bag/container holding a firearm(s). This serves as your declaration that each weapon is unloaded and both weapons and ammunition are properly packaged. It is your responsibility to obtain all the necessary permits for any firearm checked between the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
                    International Transport

                    Canada - Handguns cannot be transported to or through Canada. Non-restricted hunting rifles or competition firearms do not require specialized documentation. Please call 800-731-4000 for additional information on firearms to or from Canada. A U.S. Customs declaration issued before departing the U.S. is required before bringing your firearms back to the United States. We cannot accept rifles, shotguns and other firearms between the United States and Canada without the required documentation.
                    Mexico - Handguns cannot be transported to or through Mexico. Before any firearm can be accepted for travel to Mexico, a consulate issued permit is required. Contact the Mexican consulate nearest you for additional information on firearms to or from Mexico. A U.S. Customs declaration issued before departing the U.S. is required before bringing your firearms back to the United States. We cannot accept rifles or shotguns and other firearms between the United States and Mexico without the required documentation.

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                    • #11
                      The airlines is the easy part. The high variation between TSA and airport facilities is going to be the problem. I have traveled with guns out of Seattle, Portland, and Reno. Seattle and Portland were easy, since the airports have installed good x-ray systems for TSA to use for baggage inspection. At the time Portland was easier than Anchorage or Fairbanks.

                      Reno was a hole nuther kettle of fish. TSA has no access to an x-ray machine and every bag is opened and inspected. The TSA had to send a guy out to the counter, walk me and the bag back to a room behind the counter open up the gun case and fondle the weapon. He could not determine if the gun was unloaded (broken down semi-auto gauge), but could not let me touch the weapon and I had to talk him through the steps to check the chamber and bolt system. The only thing I was allowed to do was unlock and relock the case.

                      I recommend that your friend take a trip to the airport of departure and see what their system is. If they are leaving from a small regional airport that connects to a larger class airport like Seattle then they will have little issue once the small commuter plane checks the bag.

                      Keep in mind that small gun (camera, computer etc) cases grow legs quickly when around airplanes. I pack all my pistols in a hard case inside my luggage so that there is less of an issue with them growing legs.

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