Redhawk or GP 100 as backwoods gun. Ammo price considerations...

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I stand corrected. For some reason when I read the question, and the word 45, I automatically just think of the 1911 model semi auto. And the typical ammo that they shoot. I wasn't even thinking about the 45 revolver and the loads they can shoot. Just a brain fart I guess.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by ADfields View Post
      You can buy full power 45 Colt loads from companies like Cor-Bon or Buffalo Bore, you donít need to be a reloader for the 45 to be a better choice than the 44.
      Yes, but that stuff is too expensive for me to shoot any more often than to simply familiarize myself with it's characteristics. Like in my 1911, a couple hundred rounds of Hydra-shoks and now it's all hardball at the range. The Hydra-shoks get loaded in the magazine for carry though.

      Comment


      • #18
        thanks for the clarification

        Originally posted by chobbs View Post
        I stand corrected. For some reason when I read the question, and the word 45, I automatically just think of the 1911 model semi auto. And the typical ammo that they shoot. I wasn't even thinking about the 45 revolver and the loads they can shoot. Just a brain fart I guess.

        Thanks for clearing that up, that makes more sense.
        All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by RGL01 View Post
          Yes, but that stuff is too expensive for me to shoot any more often than to simply familiarize myself with it's characteristics. Like in my 1911, a couple hundred rounds of Hydra-shoks and now it's all hardball at the range. The Hydra-shoks get loaded in the magazine for carry though.
          Yes we all feel the pinch of the ammo price, but like I said before I don’t see a problem with practicing with a cheap load and pack a good one. You say that is what you do now in the 1911 and I feel its completely reasonable for bear defense also, actually even more so. The change in where you hit will not matter a bit at the ranges we are talking and you will never know there was a difference in recoil when under the stress of a bear attack.
          Andy
          On the web= C-lazy-F.co
          Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
          Call/Text 602-315-2406
          Phoenix Arizona

          Comment


          • #20
            Here's related question. Any reason not to carry CCI Blazer 240gr JHP ammo in the field? The non-brass (I don't know what it's made of) cased ammo is always referred to as training ammo. But isn't that only relevant to future reloading?
            http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct...tNumber=287702


            Also looking over the various loadings for .44Magnum v .45Colt what I see is that .44Magnum is always .44Magnum, while .45Colt comes in regular and "Ethyl" so to speak. One point where I disagree with you Andy is that my point with .45ACP is that whatever I fire, hardball or Hydra-shocks, I want it to feel the same. I want to "train as I fight" so to speak. 230gr hardball and 230gr Hydra-shoks have velocities within ~50 or so fps of each other. That makes me lean to either getting the Redhawk in .44magnum, or getting the Redhawk in .45Colt + some basic reloading tools! Well, first it's time to sell my Springfield Armory GI 1911, then it will be on to the fun part!

            Comment


            • #21
              I'm surprised nobody jumped in here and recommended the 454 Casull. You can shoot more inexpensive 45 Colt cartridges for practice then put the 454 rounds in there for go time. I don't understand the need to load or obtain hopped up 45 Colt rounds when lots of good Casull cartidges are readliy available off the shelf. I own both 44s and 454s and can attest to what most of you already know, the Casull makes some serious energy. It's what I pack when I am in areas where there is a good probability of an encounter with a brownie and a rifle or shotgun is too cumbersome. I can also tell you first hand that being charged by a large grizzly at close range is an intimidating experience. I would not want to be under-gunned or worried about the price of ammo to the point of being unfamiliar with my carry weapon. Good luck.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by RGL01 View Post
                Any reason not to carry CCI Blazer 240gr JHP ammo in the field? The non-brass (I don't know what it's made of) cased ammo is always referred to as training ammo. But isn't that only relevant to future reloading?
                One reason that I can think of: with large animals, you want bullets that can penetrate and break bones. Hollowpoints are fine for hunting or for 2-legged animals, but not ideal if you're worried about a bear charge. Non-expanding bullets that retain their mass are usually the first choice with field ammo. Most of this type of ammo is hardcast lead, but some are made from expensive stuff like bronze. The most common bear ammo I know about are made by Corbon, Garrett Cartridge, Grizzly Cartridge, Buffalo Bore, and Double Tap. Most of them cost a pretty penny, but Double Tap is the cheapest. (I have no idea what Double Tap's reputation is like.)

                Other than that, I see nothing wrong with Blazer's aluminum-cased ammo for people who don't reload. I think their .44 spl would be great for plinking & general defense.

                If you end up choosing a beefy .44 magnum (say, Ruger or Dan Wesson) then you have the option of loading it up with some .44 mag+p. The ones I know about are made by Buffalo Bore, Garrett, and Grizzly. As far as I know they won't fit in a Smith.

                Personally, I carry a .357 mag if I know I can get away with it. There are a few places in the SE I know of that have a few blackbear but no browns. There's nothing quite as elegant as a long-barreled .357 revolver.
                Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Here's my conclusion after performing my ammo searches. One can find many more brands of affordable (less than $40 per 50rds) .44 Magnum loads. I'm seeing good 240 grain semi-JHP at ~1200fps from the big US makers.

                  On the other hand .45 Colt seems to be limited to underpowered cowboy action loads.

                  Both calibers are offered by Buffalo Bore, Grizzly, etc. with heavy, hard hitting rounds.

                  Although I like what those heavy loads look like in .45 Colt, the lack of good selection in this caliber for a non-handloader like me has made up my mind.

                  Once I sell my SA 1911, it's going to be a .44 Magnum 4" Redhawk for me. Yahooooo!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    You won't be sorry

                    Originally posted by RGL01
                    Once I sell my SA 1911, it's going to be a .44 Magnum 4" Redhawk for me. Yahooooo!
                    I predict you will have no regrets. I suggest looking hard at the 5.5" barrel, to take better advantage of the cartridge for only a little more size. Just my taste. I have a 5.5", but usually carry my 7.5"

                    I also predict you will eventually get other caliber.

                    Not that I think you will change your mind. I just think you would eventually get both.

                    Congratulations.

                    Lost Sheep

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Lost Sheep View Post
                      I predict you will have no regrets. I suggest looking hard at the 5.5" barrel, to take better advantage of the cartridge for only a little more size. Just my taste. I have a 5.5", but usually carry my 7.5"

                      I also predict you will eventually get other caliber.

                      Not that I think you will change your mind. I just think you would eventually get both.

                      Congratulations.

                      Lost Sheep
                      Thanks, and I agree. I think I'll get a .45 Colt in time. Will definitely look at a 5.5" barrel version before reaching a conclusion. As long as it is comfortable to carry then I'd prefer the longer barrel. Also, still have my Colt Stainless 1991, so I'm not going to be without a good 1911.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I had my right wrist fused so it's great for shooting around corners, but am learning to shoot handguns lefty style. For that reason I've been considering a GP100 as well, as I always carried a .44 mag before, but want to get some good accuracy before I bite off too much gun.

                        It seems to reason Buffalo Bore 180gr hard casts would offer really good penetration in the smaller bore .357. Anyone ever do any side by side tests with that and the .44 mag with similar bullet construction? I know 320 hard casts out of the ol' Super Blackhawk would go about a foot deep into the end of a birch log at close range.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I carry a GP 100 for black bear issues. Here in Michigan they can get up to 634 pounds. I have seen one shot with a 357 and it went clean through. The end product was a dead bear. The bear however did not turn and try to eat the person shooting. I would want something bigger if I was in AK. I have 180 LBT's for mine.

                          Ron
                          "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

                          Edwin Hubble

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by akaviator View Post
                            It seems to reason Buffalo Bore 180gr hard casts would offer really good penetration in the smaller bore .357. Anyone ever do any side by side tests with that and the .44 mag with similar bullet construction?
                            I'd be curious what people say. I've had my eye on that particular ammo, that and Double Tap's 200 gr .357 hardcasts. I don't even know if 200 grainer's will fit in a Smith...? I assume so.
                            Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Wolfeye View Post
                              I'd be curious what people say. I've had my eye on that particular ammo, that and Double Tap's 200 gr .357 hardcasts. I don't even know if 200 grainer's will fit in a Smith...? I assume so.

                              I have had some bad luck with Double Tap. Inconsistent power loads. Instead I loaded up some 180 LBT's with 14 grains of H110. I am told that the Double Tap stuff is the same load. Bud light can at 20 yards, no problem. If you can or have someone near you load up a batch.

                              Ron
                              "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

                              Edwin Hubble

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Double Tap ammunition looks fairly affordable in .45 Colt. Anyone know anything about this brand?

                                http://www.midwayusa.com/browse/Brow...ring=653***691***

                                Comment

                                Footer Adsense

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X