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New Ruger LCR FORGED revolver frame

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  • New Ruger LCR FORGED revolver frame

    I was glancing at the Ruger ad for their new LCR revolver in the latest American Rifleman magazine and was amazed to see that Ruger is proudly describing the frame of the LCR as a "forging" that is "lightweight and durable."

    Could it be that Ruger is finally openly admitting that forging are superior for ligher weight and less bulky guns that are still durable? They could have used an investment casting like they do on there other revolvers - but instead they chose a forging like S&W has used for well over a century.

    Interesting to say the least.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  • #2
    Could it be that Ruger is finally openly admitting that forging are superior for ligher weight and less bulky guns that are still durable? They could have used an investment casting like they do on there other revolvers - but instead they chose a forging like S&W has used for well over a century.
    I think that they are designing a gun for a specific application and that forging is particularly suited to this application.

    Smith & Worthless may have been using forgings for over a century, but they still can't take the heat that a Ruger can.
    Now what ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Durability etc.

      In engineering and design there are always tradeoffs.

      I'm sure this LCR won't be as durable as a full sized Ruger or Colt in steel but it was designed to fit a purpose and within limitation of weight and bulk. A frame designed with a forging instead of a casting best met that design criteria. Ain investment casting would have been heavier and bulkier than the forging they chose but Ruger wanted to design a lightweight compact revolver.

      Just because it isn't as durable as a full sized carbon or stainless steel frame doesn't make it worthless any more than a S&W that won't take the pounding of a heavier bulkier Ruger.

      Originally posted by stevelyn View Post
      I think that they are designing a gun for a specific application and that forging is particularly suited to this application.

      Smith & Worthless may have been using forgings for over a century, but they still can't take the heat that a Ruger can.
      Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
      ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

      Comment


      • #4
        Forging has not proved to be stronger or more durable than investment casting. It is easier to design something smaller by forging process. The day Ruger quits investment casting for their big revolvers and does what S&W does is the day I do not buy them anymore. S&W is over prices for what you get and as said before they can not nor ever will take the pressures that the Ruger can. So Ruger is admitting nothing of the sort. The only thing that is interesting is speculation and we know what that creates.
        A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
        THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
        THE HEART OF A CHILD
        THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

        Comment


        • #5
          forgings or casting

          Forgings show their advantage where weight and bulk are an issue - like in the LCR frame and in aircraft landing gear. Investment casting are in almost all cases heavier and bulkier than an equivalent forged part.

          Investment castings do have one big advantage: they are cheaper to manufacture. Forging dies are expensive and the extra machining requires add cost to the finished product. In this case Ruger decided to "bit the bullet" and go with a more expensive forging so they could make a gun to compete with S&W's lightweight compact revolver line. The majority of buyers never shoot their carry guns more than a few times so duriability just isn't an issue.

          A significant number of shooters do appreciate workmanship and machined forged parts. These shooters keep the prices of pre-64 Winchester Mdl 70s high and keep companies like S&W, Kimber, CZ, Sako, and the custom rifle manufacturters in business. Others don't care and are happy with their Rugers. There is no right or wrong - it is a free market and we are blessed to be be able to choose.

          As to S&W not being able to take the pressure: what pistol does Ruger make that operates at a higher pressure than the .460 S&W? Like it or lump it- S&W got smart and grabbed the high end of the revolver market with the X Frame.

          Originally posted by beartooth View Post
          Forging has not proved to be stronger or more durable than investment casting. It is easier to design something smaller by forging process. The day Ruger quits investment casting for their big revolvers and does what S&W does is the day I do not buy them anymore. S&W is over prices for what you get and as said before they can not nor ever will take the pressures that the Ruger can. So Ruger is admitting nothing of the sort. The only thing that is interesting is speculation and we know what that creates.
          Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
          ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

          Comment


          • #6
            I would be careful what you put in a S&W 44mag Some special production loads would break it's little weak back. Hey, if you own a S&W 44 mag. I have a few loads I could send you (HO!!! I forgot, wear face protection just in case, and oh yeah, if the bullet sticks out the end of your chamber you might not want to pull the trigger, of course don't let me stop you, I am sure you know best).
            A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
            THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
            THE HEART OF A CHILD
            THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey, tvfinak, here is a link for you, thought you might like to spend some time on this link, I am sure you would be welcomed and your knowledge would be appreciated. Give it a shot, I think you will have a lot of fun. I don't know about everyone else but I think you would.

              http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewforum.php?f=3
              A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
              THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
              THE HEART OF A CHILD
              THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

              Comment


              • #8
                Forgings started out as castings, so whats the point?
                Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

                Comment


                • #9
                  what happens later

                  It is the hot forging of the metal into the die that aligns the grain of the metal in the right direction and removes any porosity or voids that make the difference!

                  Forging was discovered pretty early in the iron age and has been appreciated for a very long time for its ability to produce stronger and more compact parts than castings.

                  That is the point!


                  Originally posted by Paul H View Post
                  Forgings started out as castings, so whats the point?
                  Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
                  ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Has anyone seen one of these for sale in southcentral? What was the price?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Factory Loads

                      The .44 magnum load was develped around the S&W N frame- later the Model 29. The Mdl. 29 is amply strong for any standard .44 magnum factory loads. I've owned a bunch of them and examined many many more over the years and never found on that had been "shot loose".

                      Of course it is possible to grossly abuse and damage anything. When I wanted more power than the .44 Mag I jumped up to the .500 X frame rather than try and push the .44 mag platform.

                      I've got some .460 S&W loads you can try in your .454 Ruger and see it hold together and some 8mm mauser loads I've shot in a 7.7 Jap military rifle that you could try in your Ruger Hawkeye but what is the point?



                      Originally posted by beartooth View Post
                      I would be careful what you put in a S&W 44mag Some special production loads would break it's little weak back. Hey, if you own a S&W 44 mag. I have a few loads I could send you (HO!!! I forgot, wear face protection just in case, and oh yeah, if the bullet sticks out the end of your chamber you might not want to pull the trigger, of course don't let me stop you, I am sure you know best).
                      Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
                      ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tvfinak View Post
                        The .44 magnum load was develped around the S&W N frame- later the Model 29. The Mdl. 29 is amply strong for any standard .44 magnum factory loads. I've owned a bunch of them and examined many many more over the years and never found on that had been "shot loose".

                        Of course it is possible to grossly abuse and damage anything. When I wanted more power than the .44 Mag I jumped up to the .500 X frame rather than try and push the .44 mag platform.

                        I've got some .460 S&W loads you can try in your .454 Ruger and see it hold together and some 8mm mauser loads I've shot in a 7.7 Jap military rifle that you could try in your Ruger Hawkeye but what is the point?
                        Hey, don't forget to go have fun
                        http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewforum.php?f=3 :rolleyes:
                        A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
                        THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
                        THE HEART OF A CHILD
                        THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul H View Post
                          Forgings started out as castings, so whats the point?
                          Marketing hype and a reason for people to proclaim one better than the other even though decades of production show both work just fine?

                          I've got a Smith 29 I bought in the 70's as well as a Blackhawk bought in the early 80's. Both have thousands of rounds through them and still work fine.

                          To me the difference is zero.

                          Comment

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